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Tyler Parker Receives MVP Award from National Black Law Student Association

News Type Students
News Topic
Editor Emma Kapp
students

3L Tyler Parker recently won the MVP Award from the National Black Law Student Association (NBLSA). Parker, who currently serves as NBLSA’s National Director of Pre-Law Affairs, said it felt surreal to be recognized. 

“I am proud of my work to raise the percentage of Black lawyers in the United States,” she said. “My only hope is that I have inspired one more person to apply to law school despite their fears, insecurities, or doubts.” 

NBLSA is the largest student-run 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation in the country. Parker first got involved in her second year of law school, when she served as the Regional Director of Career and Professional Development, and the Regional Director of Pre-Law Affairs for the Midwest Region of NBLSA. In those roles, Parker served students in fifteen states, including all Ohio law schools. Those experiences inspired her to apply for her current position, and she was appointed in May 2023. 

Over the past 10 months, Parker has taken on a number of responsibilities, including selecting recipients of NBLSA’s pre-law scholarship program, overseeing six regional pre-law directors, and planning national events like NBLSA’s National Pre-Law Symposium. Her favorite task, though, is meeting with pre-law students from across the country. 

“During my pre-law office hours, I helped students solve problems and answered general law school application questions,” said Parker. “Many students shared their eagerness and excitement about becoming attorneys, which ultimately inspired me. Each meeting reignited my passion for pursuing the practice of law.” 

After she graduates this spring, Parker will work as an associate at Taft Stettinius & Hollister in the Columbus, Ohio office. She will also continue leading her nonprofit, Black Women in Law, which she launched this year to elevate the reach, access, and impact of Black women in the legal profession. The lessons she’s learned in law school will stay with her as she continues to inspire others and grow as a leader in law. 

“I’ve learned about the importance of social advocacy and the need for lawyers dedicated to advancing diversity within the profession,” she shared. “My lifelong goal is to diversify the legal profession, particularly for Black women. Because of my experiences, I plan to become a fierce social advocate.”

News Type Students
News Topic
Editor Emma Kapp

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