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Previous Summer Externships

Below is a listing of recent summer externships. 

  • Alexa Askari — Federal Election Commission, Office of Commissioner Weintraub
  • Jacob Carruthers — Legal Aid of Ohio
  • Shea Daley — U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, Judge Millett
  • Ryland Doerr — Bankruptcy Judge Hoffman (SD Ohio)
  • Natalie Engel — U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, Office of Chief Counsel
  • Claire Halffield — RepresentWomen
  • Ashlyn Hancock — Franklin County Prosecutor
  • Isabelle Karamuco — U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of General Counsel, Regulatory Affairs Law Division
  • Shayla Kendricks — Frost Brown Todd LLC
  • A.J. Koch — U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, Staff to Majority Counsel
  • Kevin Kolar — Clause 40 Foundation
  • Laura Loya — U.S. Senate Banking Commitee, Staff to the Minority Counsel
  • Tiraj Lucas — U.S. Representative Tim Ryan (OH 13th District)
  • Izzy Marcelletti — U.S. Department of Energy, Office of General Counsel
  • Joey Oteng — Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press
  • Raj Patel — Federal Communications Commission, Office of the General Counsel
  • Rachel Riestenberg — U.S. Department of Justice, Criminal Division, Money Laundering and Asset Recovery
  • Bailey Sanders — U.S. Department of Justice
  • Allie Stevens — Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission
  • William Tomlinson — U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, Staff to Majority Counsel
  • Celeste Acevedo — U.S. Senate Finance Committee, Staff to the Minority Counsel
  • Bret Baker — Federal Communications Commission, Office of Chairman Ajit Pai
  • Caitie Cosby — U.S. Department of Energy, Office of General Counsel
  • Chase Dean — Federal Election Commission, Office of General Counsel
  • Rachel Gurley — U.S. Department of Justice, Criminal Division, Narcotic and Dangerous Drug Section
  • Lane Hagar — Public Citizen
  • Maddie Hill — Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law
  • Zach Howard — U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Office of General Counsel
  • Andrea Howell — U.S. Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee, Staff to Majority Counsel
  • Morgan Huff — U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of General Counsel, Regulatory Affairs Law Division
  • Austin Lines — U.S. Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee, Staff to Majority Counsel
  • Brian Mashny — U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of General Counsel, Legal Counsel Division
  • Richard McCutcheon — U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Privacy Office
  • Anders Miller — U.S. Representative Bobby Scott (VA 3rd District)
  • Sophia Mills — Campaign Legal Center
  • Clare Murphy — U.S. Department of Justice, Servicemembers & Veterans Initiative
  • James Pfeiffer — Amara Legal Center
  • Aaron Pincus — U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Railroad Administration, Office of Chief Counsel
  • Megan Porter — Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law
  • Allie Roberts — Federal Trade Commission, Office of Policy Planning
  • Adriana Sandoval-Sosa — U.S. Representative Tim Ryan (OH 13th District)
  • Jim Schirmer — U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of General Counsel, Intelligence Law Division
  • Brittney Welch — U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, Office of Chief Counsel
  • Hannah Wirt — U.S. Department of Justice, Criminal Division, Office of Enforcement Operations
  • Jared Andre — U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, Judge Walton
  • Alexis Apparicio — Office of Representative Tim Ryan (D-OH 13th District)
  • Frank Bumb — U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, Staff to Majority Counsel
  • Anna Crisp — U.S. Department of Agriculture, Office of General Counsel
  • Thomas Donadio — U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of General Counsel
  • Emily Douglass — U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, Judge O’Malley
  • Ruben Garza — U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of General Counsel
  • Matt Gordon — Federal Trade Commission, Division of Financial Practices
  • Carsten Hoyt — U.S. Department of Justice, Commercial Litigation Branch
  • Riley Kane — U.S. Department of Interior, Office of the Solicitor
  • Matt Krsacok — U.S. Department of Justice, Criminal Division, Office of Policy and Legislation
  • Zach Leciejewski — Federal Communications Commission, Enforcement Bureau
  • Amanda Maxfield — U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, Judge O’Malley
  • Justin McCuen — Federal Communications Commission, Office of Chairman Ajit Pai
  • Brandon Miller — U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Privacy Office
  • Clairanne Porter — Drug Enforcement Administration
  • Jacob Schermer — Federal Election Commission, Office of Commissioner Weintraub
  • Katy Scruppi — U.S. Senate Banking Commitee, Staff to the Minority Counsel
  • Emily Shandruk — Transporation Security Administration, Office of the Chief Counsel
  • Tony Shang — U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Privacy Office
  • Brittany Stevenson — U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Immigration Litigation
  • Micaela Taylor — U.S. Department of Justice, Criminal Division, Office of Enforcement Operations
  • Jessica Van Ranken — U.S. Department of Education, Office of General Counsel
  • James White — U.S. Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee, Staff to Majority Counsel
  • Mark Widerschein — U.S. Department of Energy, Office of General Counsel

Frequently Asked Questions

Yes. The Moritz Financial Aid Office will work with you on this.

Residency is handled the same for this program as for the Oxford Summer Program. Students count their time in an approved program of the Moritz College of Law as time for residency in the State of Ohio.

The basic approach for the program is that students receive academic credit, not a salary, for the summer. The unpaid nature of most externships makes it much easier for students to get interesting, substantive positions for the summer.

 

Students in the externship class receive three credits for a mix of academic work (a class presentation and paper) and externship work. As permitted by accreditation standards, the number of hours of class meeting for this three-credit course is much lower due to the externship hours worked. In a few cases, students get paid internships and often, then do an independent study paper for credit. In conformance with American Bar Association standards, students can receive up to $100 per week from their employer, considered a reimbursement for expenses, without that being considered as paid work. In compliance with ABA rules, students also are permitted to receive funding from other sources, such as for public interest fellowships, while receiving credit.

If you find a job or externship in D.C. based on your efforts, without applying to the program first, you may still wish to participate in the program in either of two ways. First, you can contact Professor Walker, explain that you have found a position in D.C., and say you would like to enroll in the program. The likely answer will be yes. Second, you may wish to enroll in one or two of the courses without joining the full program. If so, it will be treated like signing up for any other Moritz course in the summer.

Backing out once accepted into the program is strongly discouraged. We invest our time and institutional reputation in finding internships for students. Employers likewise make an investment in Moritz as they work with us to place students. Backing out squanders these investments, and in some cases has resulted in DC employers no longer considering Moritz students for internships or employment.

 

To address this problem, students who enroll in the program must pay a $300 good faith deposit, which will be applied to the summer tuition.  A student who withdraws from the program in violation of the program rules will forfeit the initial $300 deposit. This fee reflects the time and expense for the College in individually placing the student in an externship and in not having that time available to assist other students in placement.  In a small number of instances in past years, students have withdrawn from the program due to health or other significant reasons. The administration has waived the loss of deposit in such cases.

 

This approach reflects a good-faith understanding when a student enrolls in the program. Moritz will work hard to place the student in a substantive externship, with good work experience. In return, students understand that they are asking Moritz to go through time and expense on their behalf to find that externship, and should not seek or accept employment for the summer elsewhere.

Each student will have to decide how to spend the first summer after law school. Some students come to the program in their second summer. Many students in the program have found it an excellent investment as part of their law school experience. Here are some things students have emphasized:

  • Quality of the externships. Students work in federal agencies and nonprofit groups that are national leaders in their fields. By working with leaders in their fields, Moritz students learn by doing policy and law practice. Check out the Externships page for a year-by-year list of prior placements since 2003.
  • An insider’s understanding of Washington, D.C. Students get an insider’s view of government at the federal level through the externship, the student seminar papers about different jobs, guest speakers, and discussion with Professor Walker of their experience in Washington in all three branches of the federal government and private practice.  Check out the Summer Experience page for more information on The Ethics in Washington Lawyering course and other summer events.
  • Put yourself on the national stage. A summer working in Washington, D.C., underscores to prospective employers your seriousness about working and living in the nation’s capital.  More broadly, working in D.C. is a national legal experience that many future employers nationwide value.
  • Develop professional mentors and references. In addition to obtaining a solid reference from your employer, due to the small class size, substantial writing experience in the seminar, and one-on-one mentorship with Professor Walker during the placement process and summer, you have the opportunity to develop an additional professional reference from the Moritz faculty before the start of your second year of law school.  There are also ample opportunities during the summer to network and develop relationships with our Moritz alumni in DC.
  • Develop expertise in a field. Most externships are in a specific field, such as health care, high-tech, or international trade. Your externship thus provides a chance to become more knowledgeable in that field, and to signal that expertise to future employers.