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Moritz Law  /  Registrar  /  First-Day Assignments (Autumn 2013)

First-Day Assignments

The following assignments have been submitted by professors. Please check back if your assignments are not listed as faculty members are continuosly updating this list.

 

Autumn 2013 Semester Courses and Assignments

6050 - US Legal System and Legal Traditions (Caust-Ellenbogen)

Welcome,

All of you should sign up for the TWEN for this course.  On TWEN, you will find the syllabus for this course.  In addition, I will be posting "handouts" that will be used to supplement some assignments, as well as other materials.  I will also be using TWEN to communicate with the class from time to time.

For the first class, place read pp. 117-36, which provides some background about American legal education.  We will not be covering this in class; it is just intended to provide you with some background information about law school.  We will cover pp. 92-116 during our first class.  This material presents the basic structure of the court systems in the United States.

The syllabus contains the remaining assignments for the semester, which we will be covering roughly one assignment (line) per class session.

I look forward to getting to know all of you and exploring the materials, together.

6101 - LLM Legal Writing (Lee)

 

Welcome to LLM Legal Analysis And Writing!

Before our first class, please do the following:


1. Read Chapters 1, 2, and 6 of the McGregor text. (You may skip the exercises for now.)

2. Register for this course on TWEN. The password for this course on TWEN is “synthesis.”

3. Access the “LLM Legal Analysis And Writing Questionnaire” under Course Materials on the TWEN course site. Complete the questionnaire online, and click “Submit” at the end of the form when you are done. Please submit your completed questionnaire by 8 p.m. on Tuesday, August 20, 2013.

4. Play and review the short online tutorial, “Case Law Research Tutorial: Part 1: Structure of the Court System & Introduction to the Concept of Precedent”. The link to the tutorial can be found under Course Materials on the TWEN course site.

Thank you very much, and I look forward to seeing all of you soon!

6103 - Law 1 (Lee)

 

Welcome to LAW 1!

Before our first class, please do the following:

1. Read Chapter 1, Sections I-IV, pp. 3-27, of the Shapo text.

2. Register for this course on TWEN. The password for this course on TWEN is “roadmap”.

3. Access the “LAW 1 Questionnaire” under Course Materials on the TWEN course site. Complete the questionnaire online, and click “Submit” at the end of the form when you are done. Please submit your completed questionnaire by 8 p.m. on Tuesday, August 20, 2013.

4. Create a Google account if you do not have one. To sign up for a free Google account, go to accounts.google.com. If you have a Gmail address, you already have a Google account and you do not need to do anything more.

Thank you very much, and I look forward to seeing all of you soon!

 

6103 - Law 1 (Kelly)

 

(1) Register for this class on TWEN (LAWI (Fall2013)- Kelly) and review the syllabus.

(2) Do the homework for the first class listed in the syllabus:

     a. Beazely/Smith Text: read Intro pgs 1-3, & Chs 1, 2 (skip the exercise),  3 (part C, pgs. 14-19).

     b.Complete the Dewey Dilemma (located in “Course Materials”) and bring it to class.

6103 - Law 1 (Smith)

Please read the brief introduction that I will send to you by e-mail on or before August 14.

6103 - Law 1 (Mattson)

Welcome to LAW 1! Please sign up for the course on TWEN (the Westlaw course management module) and read the syllabus. Complete the assignment listed for the first day of class. You will receive your Westlaw, Lexis, and Bloomberg passwords at orientation, so you should be able to enroll in the course on TWEN once you have received your password. The registration password for the course is George Harrison.

6103 - Law 1 (Ralph)

Welcome to LAW I! For the first class, please complete the following:

1. Sign up for the course website. Here are instructions:

  • Sign in to www.lexisnexis.com/lawschool with the ID you receive at orientation.
  • Select the “Web Courses” link on the right side of the page; from the Web Courses Home Page, select the “Courses” tab.
  • Find the course for this class in the “Course Search” tab: either “Legal Analysis & Writing I (Ralph; Thursdays Fall 2013)” or “Legal Analysis & Writing I (Ralph; Fridays Fall 2013)”
  • Select “Enroll.” The access code for both Thursday and Friday is: amicuscuriae

2. Review the course syllabus and the assignments for the first few weeks of class. The syllabus is posted on the course website under “Syllabus” and copies are also available in envelopes outside my door, 333 Drinko. Note: If you pick up the syllabus, make sure to get the syllabus for the correct class day!

3. Read Chapters 1-3 in Christine Coughlin, et al., A Lawyer Writes: A Practical Guide to Legal Analysis (2d ed. 2013) (ISBN 9781611633979).

4. Read Chapter 1 in Amy E. Sloan, Basic Legal Research: Tools and Strategies (5th ed. 2012) (ISBN 9781454808473). Note: Several copies of the Sloan book are available on reserve in the Moritz Law Library; ask at the reference desk or main desk for help finding the book/the reserve section.

5. Prepare the “Law and Literature” assignment. The assignment is posted on the course website under “Course Materials” / “First Day Assignments,” and copies are also available outside my door, 333 Drinko. You should read all the materials and be ready to discuss all the questions in the assignment.

6. Answer the LAW I Introductory Questionnaire. The LAW I Introductory Questionnaire is posted on the course website under “Course Materials” / “First Day Assignments.” Bring a typed, paper copy of your response to the LAW I Introductory Questionnaire to the first day of class.

6103 - Law 1 (Ralph)

 

Welcome to LAW I! For the first class, please complete the following:

1. Sign up for the course website. Here are instructions:

  • Sign in to www.lexisnexis.com/lawschool with the ID you receive at orientation.
  • Select the “Web Courses” link on the right side of the page; from the Web Courses Home Page, select the “Courses” tab.
  • Find the course for this class in the “Course Search” tab: either “Legal Analysis & Writing I (Ralph; Thursdays Fall 2013)” or “Legal Analysis & Writing I (Ralph; Fridays Fall 2013)”
  • Select “Enroll.” The access code for both Thursday and Friday is: amicuscuriae

2. Review the course syllabus and the assignments for the first few weeks of class. The syllabus is posted on the course website under “Syllabus” and copies are also available in envelopes outside my door, 333 Drinko. Note: If you pick up the syllabus, make sure to get the syllabus for the correct class day!

3. Read Chapters 1-3 in Christine Coughlin, et al., A Lawyer Writes: A Practical Guide to Legal Analysis (2d ed. 2013) (ISBN 9781611633979).

4. Read Chapter 1 in Amy E. Sloan, Basic Legal Research: Tools and Strategies (5th ed. 2012) (ISBN 9781454808473). Note: Several copies of the Sloan book are available on reserve in the Moritz Law Library; ask at the reference desk or main desk for help finding the book/the reserve section.

5. Prepare the “Law and Literature” assignment. The assignment is posted on the course website under “Course Materials” / “First Day Assignments,” and copies are also available outside my door, 333 Drinko. You should read all the materials and be ready to discuss all the questions in the assignment.

6. Answer the LAW I Introductory Questionnaire. The LAW I Introductory Questionnaire is posted on the course website under “Course Materials” / “First Day Assignments.” Bring a typed, paper copy of your response to the LAW I Introductory Questionnaire to the first day of class.

6103 - Law 1 (Sherowski/)

Welcome to LAW I! Here's what you need to do to get ready for the first day of class on August 22:

1. Read chapters 1 & 2 in Just Memos (relax - they're short chapters)

2. Sign up for the course on TWEN 

3. Listen to the Prologue of Episode 473: "Loopholes" on This American Life (a link is available on the TWEN page under "Web Links"). The prologue is about 10 minutes long.

4.  Download and print a copy of the syllabus from the TWEN page. Bring the copy to class.

That's it -- see you on the 22d!

 

6103 - Law 1 (Johnson)

For the first class, please read Edwards, pages 3 - 17 (to III. The Common Law Process). Be prepared to do exercises 1-2 (p. 11) and 2-1 (p.17) in class.

Use your Westlaw password to access http://lawschool.westlaw.com. Select TWEN at the top of the page and register for this course. I have scheduled mandatory tours of the Moritz Law Library for Thursday, August 22nd at 2:30 p.m., and Friday, August 23rd at 9:00 a.m. The tours will last about 45 minutes. You will find your tour group and time under "Course Materials" on the TWEN page for this section of LAW1. 

6103 - Law 1 (Azyndar)

Please sign up for the course on TWEN (access via Westlaw) and read the syllabus. Complete assignment listed for the first day.  You will receive Westlaw registration information during orientation.

6103 - Law 1 (Enns)

Welcome! I will send you the first few chapters of the Beazley/Smith text by Wednesday, August 14, as an email attachment. The email will indicate which chapters you should read for Monday's first class.

6109 - Torts (Northern)

Our first assignment is Chapter 1:  Introduction and Overview, pp. 1 -22

Prepare to discuss Weaver v. Ward,  Brown v. Kendall, and Spano v. Perini Corp.; points for discussion on pp. 11, 16, and 21-22

6109 - Torts (Carlarne)

Read casebook, pp. 1-16

6109 - Torts (Chamallas)

For the first day of class, please read pages 1-18 in the Franklin, Rabin and Green casebook.

6115 - Civil Procedure 1 (Greenbaum)

Civil Procedure I - A. Greenbaum - First Week Assignments

Class1

Introduction to Civil Procedure     Casebook 1-26; Supplement Item 1

Classes 1-4

Traditional Bases of Territorial Jurisdction    Casebook 75-86; Supplement items 2-5

 

6115 - Civil Procedure 1 (Deason)

A reading assignment for the first day of class and a syllabus will be available during your orientation from the shelves opposite the copy center.  In addition, please sign up on TWEN (The West Education Network) for Deason's Civil Procedure course. 

6115 - Civil Procedure 1 (Wilson)

For our first class, Monday, Aug. 19, 2013, please read the Preface (pp. xxv-xxvii) and pp. 1-12 in the Casebook (Yeazell, 8th ed.).  In addition, please locate and read pp. ix & xiii-xv; Fed. R. Civ. P. 12(b); 28 U.S.C. sections 41, 133, 1331, 1332, 1333, and 1337; and U.S. Constitution Art. III in your 2013 Rules Supplement.  Please do not be late for our 8:50 a.m. class.  Be ready to start before 8:50.

6115 - Civil Procedure 1 (Caust-Ellenbogen)

Class,

Welcome to Civil Procedure.  This is a wonderful, yet often mysterious subject.  I will be your guide as we discover the intricacies of this subject.  As you first assignment (which will take us the first few classes), I want you to read pp. 1-27 in the casebook for general background.  We will not review these materials in detail during class.  During class, we will be covering Fuentes v. Shevin, which I have made available in the "course materials" section of the TWEN for this course.  This means that you must first sign onto Westlaw and enroll in the TWEN for this course.  (We will be using TWEN throughout the course to communicate and to provide you with various supplemental materials.)  Although there is a brief discussion of Fuentes in your Casebook, I would like you to read the more complete discussion of the case that I have posted on TWEN.

In reading Fuentes, I want you to pay attention to what the underlying dispute between Mrs. Fuentes and Firsestone is, and how the parties have chosen to resolve this dispute.  Ask yourself how you might have proceeded if you were in their shoes.  Then reread the case, focusing on what the issue in the case is and how the Supreme Court resolved the issue.  Ask yourself how and why the initial dispute morphed into this one (and who, exactly is Shevin?).  Finally, consider the different views of the majority and dissenting opinions in the case.  What accounts for the differing views?  How wide is the gulf between their views?  After Fuentes, under what circumstances could a seizure take place without affording the affected person a pre-seizure hearing?

My hope is that, by the time we finish our discussion of Fuentes, you will get a sense of what Civil Procedure is about.  And, as is often the case with law, and law school, you will be left with many more questions than answers.

I have now added the syllabus for this course.  It is available on TWEN.

I look forward to a great semester with all of you.

6127 - Criminal Law (Herman)

(a)  Please read the problem case (photocopied materials, first item), fill out the answer sheet that follows, sign it, bring it to class, and turn it in to me.

(b)  Answer the questionnaire (photocopied materials, second item), do not sign it, bring it to class, and turn it in to me.  There is a duplicate questionnaire for your retention and use.

(c)  Read Casebook pages xxxi-xxxii and pages 1-12.

(d)  Look at the chart of the criminal law system (photocipied materials, third item) and read the related Note on the Stages of the Criminal Process (photocopied materials, fourth item).

WELCOME TO THE LEGAL PROFESSION, TO THE MORITZ COLLEGE OF LAW, AND TO THE CRIMINAL LAW COURSE!

6127 - Criminal Law (Dressler)

1.  For the first class, please read pages 1-9 (up to Part D. on page 9) of the Dressler-Garvey casebook.

2.  Optional reading: Read Section 1.01 and Chapter 3 of the treatise, UNDERSTANDING CRIMINAL LAW.

3.  During Orientation you will be provided with a WestLaw password.  Once you have it, you should go online to the The West Educational Network (TWEN) and register yourself for Criminal Law.   (Be careful, I am teaching two sections, so be sure you register for YOUR section.)  REGISTRATION ON TWEN IS REQUIRED.  Once you are registered, you will see two handouts: (a) Syllabus (providing you with the assignments for the entire semester); and (b) Class Information Sheet (which provides important information about the class).

6127 - Criminal Law (Dressler)

 1. For the first class, please read pages 1-9 (up to Part D. on page 9) of the Dressler-Garvey casebook.

2. Optional reading: Read Section 1.01 and Chapter 3 of the treatise, UNDERSTANDING CRIMINAL LAW.

3. During Orientation you will be provided with a WestLaw password. Once you have it, you should go online to the The West Educational Network (TWEN) and register yourself for Criminal Law. (Be careful, I am teaching two sections, so be sure you register for YOUR section.) REGISTRATION ON TWEN IS REQUIRED. Once you are registered, you will see two handouts: (a) Syllabus (providing you with the assignments for the entire semester); and (b) Class Information Sheet (which provides important information about the class).

6127 - Criminal Law (Federle)

  For class on Monday, August 19, please read Dressler and Garvey, pp. 29-48, and be prepared to discuss.

  For class on Tuesday, August 20, please read Dressler and Garvey, pp. 49-71, and be prepared to discuss.

   For class on Wednesday, August 21, please read Dressler and Garvey, pp. 92-105, and be prepared to discuss.

6127 - Criminal Law (Berman)

In preparation for our first class on Monday, August 19, you should:

1. Obtain a copy of Kaplan, Weisberg and Binder, Criminal Law (7th ed. 2012)

2. Obtain a copy of the course description and the course syllabus (part 1), which are available in box outside the copy center and on the course website.

3. Read the text's Introduction quickly and pages 21-27, 31-34, and 573-79 closely. Because the next set of readings provide theoretical background, can be read quickly, and should enhance your appreciation of our initial discussions, I encourage you also to SKIM pages 34‑77 in the text as soon as possible.

7003 - Appellate Advocacy (Beazley)

Please read chapters 1-3 in A Practical Guide to Appellate Advocacy.

7003 - Appellate Advocacy (Beazley)

Please read chapters 1-3 in A Practical Guide to Appellate Advocacy.

7003 - Appellate Advocacy (Beazley)

Please read chapters 1-3 in A Practical Guide to Appellate Advocacy.

7103 - Issues in Arbitration (Cole)

Please read in the duplicated materials pp. 1-6, 67-85 and Appendix A, The Federal Arbitration Act, sections 1-4 before class.  Also, over the course of the first two days, be prepared to discuss problems 7.1-7.5.

7106 - Legal Negotiations and Settlements (Stulberg)

1.  Read all selections in Chapter 15 - Wiggins/Lowry, Negotiation and Settlement Advocacy - especially pages 565-576.  M-Z (last names) on call.

2.  Read assigned role play for negotiation simulation Rocky & Star.  Materials available for pickup from Room 326, beginning Wednesday, August 14.  (Reading assignment is 2 typewritten pages). 

3.  All students must sign onto course TWEN page.  Access available beginning Monday, August 12.  Course syllabus is posted to website.

7112 - Dispute Resolution Processes: Theory & Practice (Stulberg)

1.   For first two days of class, read pages 1-8 (Goldberg) from Cousepak.

2.  Beginning August 14, course TWEN-site active.

     a.   All students should register on course TWEN site - www.lawschool.westlaw.com

     b.   Syllabus posted to TWEN site.

7200 - Business Associations (Davidoff)

Class 1: Introduction
 
OKT:  1-14

 

Class 2: Agency
 
OKT: 14-39
 
Class 3: Agency, Partnership: Fiduciary Duties and Governance  
 OKT 39-56 (skip section 2.b at pp. 55-56 concerning the limited liability company)
 
Class 4
OKT:  56-68 (review Problems 2-1 & 2-2)
 
OKT = O'Kelley, Thompson, Corporations and Other Business Associations (6th Edition) 
 
Please also sign up for the course on TWEN

7200 - Business Associations (Oesterle)

Please refer to the TWEN site for the 1st Day assignment.

7206 - Insurance Law (Anstaett)

For the first day please read pages 1 to 21 (through note 5), What is Insurance?  If you have the newer edition of the book, it is the first chapter stopping at the notes on Automobile Insurance.

7209 - Accounting & Finance for Lawyers (Oesterle)

Please refer to the TWEN site for the 1st Day assignment.

7210 - Business Bankruptcy (Hoffman Jr.)

For the first class on Wednesday, August 21, please read the following: (1) Elizabeth Warren and Jay Lawrence Westbrook, The Law of Debtors and Creditors: Text, Cases, and Problems (Wolters Kluwer, 6th edition 2009), pp. 101–111 (Introduction to Bankruptcy), 361–370 (Chapter 7 Liquidation), 387–406 (Chapter 11 Reorganization/Introduction to Business Bankruptcy); and (2) Bankruptcy Code §§ 103, 109(a), (b) and (d), 301 and 303(a) (located in Bankruptcy Code, Rules and Official Forms (West 2012 Law School Edition)).

For those students who have not taken the debtor-creditor class, I also would recommend that you skim pp. 5–21, 29–42 and 71–77 of Bankruptcy Basics, a publication of the Administrative Office of the United States Courts.

For those students who have taken a bankruptcy course, reviewing Bankruptcy Basics will provide a good refresher.

7214 - Contracts II (Garvin)

Welcome back! For our first class, please prepare pages 184-193 of your casebook and pages 12-13 of your contract drafting book, along with the corresponding pages of the photocopied materials available by around August 8 in the boxes opposite the Copy Center (and available now on the course TWEN site, which you should join). In addition, please skim pages 1-7 of the contract drafting book. For our second class, please prepare pages 234-247 of your casebook and the corresponding pages of the photocopied materials. Bring these materials to class, along with the Selections book.

7221 - Corporate Finance (Rose)

Pages 1-16.

7230 - Intl Business Transactions (Chow)

For the first class, read pp. 1-12 in the Chow and Schoenbaum casebook and be prepared to discuss Problems 1-1, 1-2, 1-3, and 1-4.

7233 - Capital Markets (Davidoff)

The Architecture of our Capital Markets.  What are the forces driving the structure of capital markets in the United States and in other nations?

 Please read The End by Michael Lewis (a copy has been uploaded to course materials for this course on TWEN). 

Steven M. Davidoff, Paradigm Shift: Securities Regulation in the New Millennium, 2 Brook. J. Corp. Fin. & Com. L. 339 (read intro. and Part I) (2008) (NB.  Please pull from Hein on-line so you can review the charts)

7300 - Commercial Paper (Verdun)

Read Chapter 1 - Negotiability and carefully review all referenced statutes.  Be prepared to discuss and solve all problems in class.

7310 - Transactional Lawyering (Starker)

 There are three assignments for the first day: (1) Read Chapters 1 & 2 of Working with Contracts; (2) sign up for the Transactional Lawyering course on TWEN and read the syllabus, which will be posted on or about August 12th; (3) go to us.practicallaw.com/about/lawstudent and sign up for a free student account. I look forward to meeting all of you!

7312 - Debtor & Creditor (Johnson)

Your assignment for the first day is to read Chapter 1 and do all the problems contained therein. 

7406 - Criminal Procedure: Investigation (Simmons)

For the first day of class, you must be registered on the course website on TWEN.  You must also read the Study Guide and the first three chapters of the textbook.  A copy of the syllabus is available in the mailboxes across the hall from the copy center.

7503 - Advanced Constitutional Law: The First Amendment (Tokaji)

For our first class, please read the text of the First Amendment (p. xxxv) and pp. 3-17 in our primary casebook, Stone et al., The First Amendment (4th ed. 2012) (“FA”), as well as pp. 2-12 in our supplement Global Issues in Freedom of Speech ("GI").
 
You should also read this discussion of the First Amendment issues surrounding world-famous leaker Edward Snowden.   Should the First Amendment be understood to protect Snowden's alleged actions?  Would it violate the First Amendment if he were prosecuted under 18 U.S.C. 798?  If  Snowden leaked classified information to a newspaper, which then published the classified information, would it violate the First Amendment if that newspaper (or its reporters) were prosecuted?  (Assume the classified information falls within the scope of 798(a)(3).)
 
Would the level of constitutional protection be different in England or Canada?
 
You should register for this course on TWEN.
 

7603 - Family Law (Spindelman)

 

Welcome to Family Law! For our first class, please read pp. 1-13 and 49-59 in Judith Areen, Marc Spindelman & Philomila Tsoukala, Family Law: Cases and Materials (6th ed. 2012). Also, please sign up on the TWEN site for the course. Look forward to seeing you soon!

7610 - Sexual Orientation & The Law (Colker)

Please read pages 30-51 of Hunter & Eskridge casebook. The syllabus is available on TWEN. 

7712 - International Law (Quigley)

Janis & Noyes, International Law: Cases and Materials (4th ed. 2011), pp. 1 to 3 and pp. 28 to 43.

7803 - Trademark (Wilson)

First reading assignment:
pages 3-17 and §§1, 2, 3, 32, 43, 45 of the Lanham Act

7806 - Privacy (Hirsch)

Read and be prepared to discuss pp. 1-40 In the Solove & Schwartz casebook.

8000 - Trial Practice (Marbley)

First Class Assignment:

I.          Introduction to Course                                                

A.                Methodology

B.                Necessity for Preparation and Participation
                                                                                               
C.                Discussion: Theory of the Case and Its Importance

D.        
       Techniques of Direct Examination

E.        
       Techniques of Cross-Examination

F.        
       Assignments for Class 2

1.                        Problem 1:  As conduct direct examination of Officer Bier.  Bs conduct cross-examination of Officer Bier.

2.                        Students should also be prepared to discuss theory of the case as it relates to the assigned problem.

3.                        Reading: Lubet, Chapters 1, 2, 4, 5 and 9

8008 - Appellate Advocacy IV (Sutton/Smith)

None

8109 - Employment Discrimination Law (Hébert)

Syllabus and Duplicated Materials available in handout boxes

Aug. 19 Duplicated Materials 1-13

Aug. 20 Duplicated Materials 14-38

Aug. 21 CB 1-16

Aug. 22 CB 16-39

8189.02 - Civil Law Clinic (Akbar/Cooke)

No first-day assignments.

8189.03 - Criminal Prosecution Clinic (Merritt/Krivoshey)

Please pick up the materials from the Moritz Copy Center and register for the TWEN site; both will be available in August. You will find the first assignment on the syllabus, included in both the materials and on the TWEN site. We look forward to seeing you in class!

8189.04 - Justice for Children Clinic (Jordan)

 

Read Part 1 of the National Juvenile Defense Standards, found at http://www.njdc.info/pdf/NationalJuvenileDefenseStandards2013.pdf

8189.05 - Legislation Clinic (Huefner/Enns)

Please pick up course materials, consisting of a three-ring binder of readings (the “Clinic Binder”), and read Tab 1 and the materials in the front pocket of the binder. Also, please read Chapters 1 and 2 of the Legislative Service Commission’s Guidebook for Ohio Legislators, found here: http://www.lsc.state.oh.us/guidebook/default.htm .

 

We look forward to seeing you on Monday, August 19, at 3:55 in room 455.

 

8189.07 - Mediation Clinic (Cole/Archerd)

Please read pp. 120-29 before our first class meeting.

8200 - Evidence (Simmons)

Foreword, Study Guide, Chapters 1 & 3.

All students must register on the course's TWEN page by the first day of class. 

A copy of the syllabus is available in the mailboxes across from the copy center.

 

8203 - Civil Procedure 2 (Fairman)

For Monday, August 19, 2013, please read the Preface and pages 279-87 in the casebook, Stephen Yeazell, Civil Procedure (8th ed. 2012).

8210 - Constitutional Litigation (Walker)

Reading for first day is from the new edition (3d) of the casebook, pages 413-427 (Peculiar Structure of Constitutional Litigation, the Eleventh Amendment, and Ex Parte Young; main case is Edelman v. Jordan).

Reading for the rest of the week is from the case book, pages 1-15, 31-41 (Suits Against Officers: The Emergence of 42 USC 1983; main cases are Monroe v. Pape; Hafer v. Melo).

Be sure to register on TWEN and download the syllabus from there.

8212 - Pretrial Litigation (Lazear)

In-class assignment: introduce selves and describe litigation background, if any. Class will be divided into several law firms. Each law firm should have at least one copy of textbook.

8303 - Immigration Law (Bloomfield)

Class I assignment: Source materials and introductory matters will be discussed. We will go over general items and a bit of history on the subject matter. There will also be a general discussion concerning the various federal agencies that impact upon the practice of Immigration and Nationality law including the State Department, the Department of Labor, the Justice Department and most importantly Homeland Security.

Permission to work within 8 CFR 274a.12 will be discussed and the student should be prepared to respond as to the categories of permission.

The following pages are assigned for reading for the first week from the required text:

1-24
113-123
132-140
155-159
171-173
177-182
195-197
xv-xviii (The acronyms)
Read 8 CFR 274a.12

8306 - Administrative Law (Shane)

 For our first class, please read pp. 1-39 of the Mashaw, Merrill and Shane text.  Please note also that our class will operate with a “no laptop” – or, more accurately, “no computing device” – policy. That is, unless students are required to use an electronic note taking device as a disability accommodation, laptops, tablets, and all other electronic communication devices should be turned off while class in session.

8403 - Ethical Issues (Laughlin Jr.)

Dear Ethical Issues Students

As you probably know, the Ethical Issues of the Professions course combines students and faculty from several professional colleges and schools at Ohio State (such as Law, Medicine and Allied Medicine ) and even some colleges and schools outside of Ohio State. In order to accommodate the schedules of all these students and faculty, classes will not start until October 1st. On and after October 1 we will meet for 10 straight Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Each class will last until about 9:30 ( not later). The last class will be on December 3.

Readings for the classes be made available on the Carmen website. Use of the Carmen website will be explained at the first class. There is no assignment for the first class.. Classes will be held at 136 Atwell Hall in the medical center complex.

If you have any questions contact me by email or phone (292-2448).

8603 - Real Estate Development (Daley)

No first-day assignment.

8709 - Wills Trusts & Estates (Moore)

The assignment for the first day of class is:  Read pp. 16 – 38 in the text.

Before the first day of class, please sign up for the course on TWEN and pick up and read a copy of the syllabus, available in the boxes outside of the first-floor Copy Center.

8712 - Taxation of Business Enterprises (Samansky)

Assignments for the first week are provided below.  Pages refer to the Peroni and Bank casebook.   

  8/20:  1-11, 15-19, 50-60

  8/21:  67-82

  8/22:  82-98

8809 - Health Law (Parasidis)

 There are two handouts for the first day of class. The first is an article written by Atul Gawande in The New Yorker, "The Cost Conundrum" (June 1, 2009). The second is a report published by The Commonwealth Fund titled, "The US Health System in Perspective: A Comparison of Twelve Industrialized Nations" (July 2011). Both documents were emailed to students registered as of August 12, 2013. Hard copies are available outside Professor Parasidis's office (Room 331). If no copies remain, please email Professor Parasidis at: parasidis.1@osu.edu

8821 - Nonprofit Organizations (Jenkins)

Please read pages 2-12 of the casebook.

8824 - Lawyers and Media (Weaver)

None.

8896.08 - Sem: Law, History, & Philosophy (Fink)

Assignment for First Day

Pick up mimeographed materials.  Read the Introduction beginning on page one and look over the list of topics and prepare to make at least a tentative choice for the topic of your paper and the discussion of that topic you will present to the class.

On the first day, we will discuss the Declaration of Independence and the Gettysburg Address, which are found on pages 93-101.

The bulk of the materials are suggested articles for you to consult as an aid in preparing your topics. Different persons will find different articles helpful.  We will refer to some of these materials in class.

For the second class, I will begin with the history of the common law and equity as part of the Colonial Background, with material I have written that begins on page 247.

8896.11 - Sem: International Crim Law (Quigley)

A syllabus is being distributed in the box located in the basement of Drinko Hall. That syllabus is also posted on TWEN. Attached to the syllabus (both the hard-copy version and the TWEN version) are short excerpts from three books on international criminal law. These excerpts provide an introduction to the topic of international criminal law. They should be read for the first session of the seminar.

8896.11 - Sem: Education Law (Wilson)

For our first class, Tuesday, Aug. 20, 2013, please read pp. 1-147 in the Ravitch book and pp. 1-44; 171-180; 265-266; and 394-395 in the Nutshell.  Also, please select a general topic for your Seminar Paper.  Please email me if you have any questions.  Thanks.  --charlie wilson

8896.14 - Sem: Tax Policy (Hoffer)

Welcome to tax policy!  For our first class, read the linked article.  Note things that surprise you about it.  Also note premises or data with which you disagree.  Is the tax system described by the article just?  Why or why not, and what would you change?  Here is article: http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2012/04/how-we-pay-taxes-11-charts/255954/

 

8896.22 - Sem: Sexual Harassment (Hébert)

Duplicated Materials, including syllabus, available at Copy Center

First class: August 20th

Assignment: Duplicated Materials 1-66

8896.26 - Sem: Critical Race Theory (Verdun)

Read "White Like Me" by Tim Wise

8896.37 - Sem: Money & Politics (Tokaji)

For our first class, please read:
 
- Daniel Hays Lowenstein, On Campaign Finance Reform: The Root of All Evil Is Deeply Rooted, 18 Hofstra L. Rev. 301 (1989). You can skim Part IV ("A Reform Proposal").
- Richard Briffault, Lobbying and Campaign Finance: Separate and Together, 19 Stan. L. & Pol'y Rev. 105 (2008).
- Citizens United v. FEC (2010), in your casebook ("CB"), Lowenstein, Hasen & Tokaji, Election Law: Cases and Materials (5th ed. 2012), at pp. 738-59.
 
You should also sign up for this course on TWEN, where the above articles and all other supplemental readings will be made available.
 
Consider the following questions:
 
1. What level of constitutional protection should campaign contributions and expenditures enjoy?
2. What level of protection should lobbying enjoy?
3. What are the leading rationales for regulation of the money used for election campaigns or lobbying? How persuasive are they?
4. What is corruption?

8896.38 - Sem: Marijuana Law, Policy & Reform (Berman)

In preparation for our first class on Thursday, August 22, you should: 

    1.  Get a copy of Alex Kreit, Controlled Substances: Crime, Regulation and Policy (Carolina Academic Press 2013), and QUICKLY read pp. 3-52; 

    2.  Get a copy of the course description and course outline handout, to which a PreClass Questionnaire should be attached;

    3.  Bookmark the blog Marijuana Law, Policy & Reform, which I have started (for this class and other purposes) and appears at http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/marijuana_law/ 

    4.  Complete (without your name) the PreClass Questionnaire and submit it to one of my secretaries; AND 

    5.  Consider keeping clear the period from 2:45 to 4:30pm on Fridays Aug. 23 and Aug. 30 for optional movie-watching session to see parts of the documentary "Prohibition" and then to celebrate the 21st Amendment at a local establishment

 

8956 - Jury Instruction (Frost/Judge)

The first day reading assignment is:
 
        Robert P. Charrow & Veda R. Charrow, Making Legal Language Understandable: A Psycholinguistic Study of Jury Instructions, 79 Colum. L. Rev. 1306, 1306-11, 1341-60 (1979) (read Introduction, Section I, Section IV, and Conclusion).