CHAPTER 9 – INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS

9.01. Two Programs of Instruction for the J.D. Program.

There shall be in the J.D. program of the College of Law only two programs of instruction: (1) the regular program of three academic years with graduation in June; (2) the accelerated program – six consecutive semesters which include two summer half-semester sessions – with graduation in December.

Source: Faculty minutes, May 22, 1952 and September 3, 2003.

9.02. Calendar and Class Schedules; Procedure for Adoption.

At an appropriate time each year, the Dean or the Dean’s designee shall promulgate a proposed calendar, class schedule, and examination schedule for the next academic year. Copies of these items shall be distributed to members of the faculty, members of the Student Bar Association, Administration Committee, student class officers, and student members of faculty committees. Copies shall also be posted on the College of Law main floor closed bulletin board for general perusal by students. The Dean or the Dean’s designee shall receive comments and suggestions for at least two weeks, and shall then promulgate a revised version of the calendar and class schedule. The Dean or the Dean’s designee shall have the authority to then promulgate final class schedules. The calendar shall be submitted for approval of the Administration Committee or an ad hoc committee appointed by the Dean.

Source: Faculty minutes, April 5, 1967, minutes, November 1, 1972, May 22, 1974, June 11, 1975, and November 28, 1984.

9.03. Class Scheduling.

A. 8:00 a.m. Classes. There shall be no classes scheduled during the 8:00 to 8:50 a.m. hour except when a faculty member agrees that his or her class be scheduled during that time. Generally, the 8:00 to 8:50 a.m. hour will be utilized by adjunct professors.

B. Saturday Classes. There shall be no classes scheduled on Saturdays except when a faculty member requests that his or her class or seminar be scheduled on such day.

C. Open Hours. The time 12:10-2:15 p.m. on Thursdays will be kept open for regular and special faculty meetings and for faculty committee meetings. To the extent practicable, an effort should be made to keep one or two noon hours free from regular classes, in order to allow the scheduling of make-up classes and special events.

Source: Faculty minutes, April 28, 1971, March 17, 1999, and January 13, 2011.

9.04. Principles Concerning Courses and Course Requirements, Number in Classes.

In general, no section of a second- or third-year course in the J.D. program should have an enrollment exceeding 75; no section of a first-year course should have an enrollment exceeding 100.

Source: Faculty minutes, May 25, 1967, March 17, 1999, and September 3, 2003.

9.05. Small Section Program in the J.D. Program.

A. Consistent with faculty availability and other needs, the College of Law will endeavor to offer a sufficient number of sections of first-year courses in the J.D. program so that each firstyear student will be enrolled in one small section during the fall semester, in addition to the courses in Legal Analysis and Writing.

B. The small section course offered in addition to those in Legal Analysis and Writing shall include significant enriching experiences, at least one of which shall be a midterm examination that contributes to the student’s final grade and offers some type of feedback before the semester ends. The choice of examination and feedback format remains in the discretion of the instructor.

Source: Faculty minutes, March 15, 1989, January 27, 1999, March 17, 1999, September 3, 2003, and February 3, 2011.

9.06. Assignment Preference for J. D. Students in Over- subscribed Courses.

Where more students than can be accommodated have registered, at the pre-announced registration time, for a particular course or section of a course, third-year students in the J.D. program shall have preference over second-year students in the J.D. program and accelerators shall have preference over non-accelerators, except that in Evidence, Business Associations, and Federal Income Taxation second-year students shall have preference over third-year students who have had a previous opportunity to enroll in the course. Subject to faculty approval, the Academic Affairs Committee may adopt further rules governing assignment preferences. Those rules shall be announced to the students before preregistration begins.

Source: Faculty minutes, March 2, 1977, December 6, 1996, February 12, 1997, and September 3, 2003.

9.07. Student Employment.

The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs shall be responsible for maintaining records of student employment. Students shall identify where and to what extent they expect to be employed during the academic year.

Source: Faculty minutes, May 25, 1977, and March 17, 1999.

9.08. Class Attendance.

A faculty member may establish a rule of attendance by announcement no later than the first week of the semester. Continued enrollment may be conditioned upon compliance with the rule of the faculty member and the final grade adjusted for noncompliance with the rule. Whether or not a faculty member has established a rule of attendance, continued enrollment is conditioned upon and the final grade may be adjusted for failure to comply with the rules and regulations of the University and of bar-admitting authorities or with the standards of accrediting organizations.

Source: Faculty minutes, March 11, 1981.

9.09. Grading of Students’ Work.

Grading of student work shall be by the use of both letter grades and numerical grades. Letter grades are assigned credit points and are used in calculating standing in the University for purposes of graduation and dismissal. Numerical grades shall be used in calculating standing in class for making awards and granting honors.

Source: Faculty minutes, October 1, 1959.

9.10. Letter and Numerical Grades.

Letter grades, numerical grade ranges for letter grades, and credit points earned shall be as follows:

A          93-100           4.0 credit points per credit hour.

A-         90-92            3.7 credit points per credit hour.

B+        87-89            3.3 credit points per credit hour.

B          83-86            3.0 credit points per credit hour.

B-        80-82            2.7 credit points per credit hour.

C+       77-79             2.3 credit points per credit hour.

C          70-76            2.0 credit points per credit hour.

D          65-69            1.0 credit points per credit hour.

E                                 60-64 no credit points.

I                                  Incomplete work.

P                                 Progress in multiple semester courses.

R                                 Audit.

S                                 Satisfactory.

U                                 Unsatisfactory.

K                                 Transfer credit from other law schools for which the student received a C or higher grade.

Source: Faculty minutes, October 1, 1959, March 11, 1970, May 3, 1995, and February 15, 2006.

9.11. Disclosure of Class Rank Information for the J.D. Program.

After the conclusion of each academic year, the Dean or his or her designee shall issue a grade distribution statement for each class in the J.D. program (first-year, second-year cumulative, and third-year cumulative). These statements shall be similar in form to the model for grade distribution for the Class of 1989, which was as follows:

CLASS OF 1989
GRADE DISTRIBUTION

APPROXIMATE AVERAGE                     PERCENT OF CLASS
95-96                                                   5%*
93-94                                                   10%
92-93                                                   20%
91                                                         35%
89-90                                                   50%
77                  MINIMUM AVERAGE
NEEDED FOR GOOD STANDING

* THOSE PERSONS IN THE TOP 5% OF THE CLASS ARE RANKED
INDIVIDUALLY.

THIS DISTRIBUTION IS MADE AVAILABLE PRIMARILY TO ENABLE
STUDENTS TO DETERMINE THEIR APPROXIMATE CLASS STANDING.
EMPLOYERS ARE CAUTIONED TO USE THIS INFORMATION
JUDICIOUSLY. AS THE CHART SHOWS, MINOR DIFFERENCES IN
ACADEMIC AVERAGES CAN HAVE VERY SIGNIFICANT EFFECTS UPON
CLASS STANDING. ALL OF OUR STUDENTS HAVE SURVIVED A
COMPETITIVE AND CAREFUL ADMISSIONS PROCESS AND
GENERALLY ARE SUPERBLY QUALIFIED FOR THE PRACTICE OF LAW.

The appropriate third-year cumulative grade distribution statement shall be made a part of a student’s transcript.

The precise class ranks of students who rank in the upper five percent of their classes shall be communicated to the students in question. The precise class ranks of students who rank in the upper five percent of their class cumulatively for their three years of law school shall be recorded on their transcripts. Class rank information shall not otherwise be disclosed to students except insofar as is necessary in connection with Law Journal selection, election to Coif, and the awarding of other honors based on class rank.

Source: Faculty minutes, October 26, 1988, March 17, 1999, and September 3, 2003.

9.12. Class Ranking of Students in J.D. Program, Limitation.

A. Except as provided in subsection B, class ranking, if calculated, shall not be recorded in students’ records and shall not be communicated to anyone, including the students so ranked. Rankings will be available only for determination of eligibility for election to the Order of the Coif and other special honors based on ranking. The highest numerical average may be disclosed and students shall be placed on a percentile scale prepared in a similar manner to that utilized in reporting LSAT standings. The College shall issue a statement explaining grading procedures and the grade average distribution.

B. The class rank of students in the top 5% of the class shall be reported in student records and shall be made available on the same basis as other information in the student’s records.

C. In calculating class ranking, grade point average will not be computed beyond the first decimal place. In case of ties, rank will be established by rounding downward, that is, if several students are tied at the bottom of a category, all will be included in that category.

Source: Faculty minutes, March 4, 1970, October 18, 1978, November 1, 1978, and September 3, 2003.

9.13. Ranking of Irregular Students in the J.D. Program.

Class ranking of students in the J.D. program shall be computed on the basis of all grades received, regardless of interruption, except that if the grading scale is changed during the period of interruption, the grades received prior to the change of scale shall be converted to the new scale.

Source: Faculty minutes, May 26, 1971 and September 3, 2003.

9.14. What Grades Show.

An A or A- in a course indicates high distinction within the class; a B+, B, or B- indicates distinction within the class; a C+ or C indicates that the student has demonstrated professional competence; a D is sufficient for course credit. An S takes the place of and is equivalent to one of the above grades in recording passing work. An E or a U represents failing work in the course.

Source: Through 1971-72 Bulletins as amended by faculty for inclusion in 1973-74 Bulletin, and Faculty minutes February 15, 2006.

9.15. Point-hour Average, How Computed.

The point-hour ratio of a student shall be computed by dividing the sum of the applicable number of credit hours in which the marks, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, D, or E have been given into the sum of the credit points assigned for such hours, with appropriate grade substitutions as may be provided in Rules 9.30 and 9.31. Credit hours and marks earned at a foreign institution under Faculty Rule 9.46 shall not be calculated for the purposes of this rule.

Source: Faculty minutes, October 1, 1959, April 14, 1973, April 14, 1993, March 17, 1999 and February 15, 2006.

9.16. Weighted Numerical Average, How Determined.

The weighted numerical average shall be calculated in such a way that grades in first-year courses carry fifty percent as much weight per credit hour as advanced courses. First-year courses shall be those courses taken by most students in the first year of the J.D. program even though a particular student may take the course at some time later than the first year.

Source: Faculty minutes, February 23, 1977 and September 3, 2003.

9.17. Relative Class Standing, How Determined.

All questions which depend on relative standing in the class, including the awarding of honors, shall be determined by the weighted numerical average of the students.

Source: Faculty minutes, July 16, 1953.

9.18. Incomplete E Grade in Determining Class Standing.

An E Incomplete shall be treated as 61 points for purposes of determining class standing.

Source: Executive Committee Minutes, July 26, 1961.

9.19. Late Enrollment.

A student may not enroll:

A. In any course other than a seminar, clinical practicum, or Trial Practice after the third meeting of that course, or
B. In any seminar, clinical practicum, or in Trial Practice after the first meeting of that seminar or course,

without the permission of the instructor concerned and of the Dean or his or her designee.

Source: Faculty minutes, April 25, 1970, February 25, 1970, and March 17, 1999.

9.20. First-Year Load-Lightening; Excuse from Full-Time Attendance; Academic Affairs Committee.

A. The Academic Affairs Committee shall be empowered to except from full-time attendance, for good cause shown, a student in the J.D. program who has otherwise been accepted for full-time study. A part-time student shall be considered as one-half student for purposes of 54 limitations on admission. For students in the J.D. program, attendance on a part-time basis shall require enrollment for a minimum of 6 hours per semester.

B. Any first-year law student in the J.D. program may petition the Academic Affairs Committee for authority to lighten his or her load during the first year in the College. Such petitions shall be acted upon by the Academic Affairs Committee.

C. Applications for relief under division B may be granted when the Academic Affairs Committee finds that the applicant: (1) has primary personal or economic responsibility for a child or other dependent; (2) has experienced individual difficulties external to the College of Law which have materially disrupted learning opportunities; or (3) has experienced academic difficulty and indicates that his or her progress in the College will be materially improved by granting the requested relief.

D. Applications for relief will normally be denied unless made within 6 weeks after the beginning of the course or courses involved or within 10 days after the occurrence of the facts constituting the grounds for the application.

E. Applications requesting waiver of the limitations expressed in divisions C and D of this rule will be granted upon demonstration of extraordinary circumstances.

Source: Faculty minutes, December 1, 1971, December 31, 1972, November 17, 1976, April 26, 1978, March 17, 1999, and September 3, 2003.

9.21. Taking Postponed or Dropped First-Year Courses in the J.D. Program.

A course postponed under Rule 9.20 or dropped under Rule 9.22 must be taken by the student who postponed taking it or who dropped it, the next time such course is offered.

Source: Faculty minutes, December 1, 1971, December 31, 1972, November 17, 1976, March 17, 1999, and September 3, 2003.

9.22. Withdrawal From Courses and Seminars.

The following shall govern withdrawal by students from courses and seminars in the College of Law:

A. First-year Students in the J.D. Program. The faculty committee charged under Rule 9.20 with the responsibility for considering applications of first-year students in the J.D. program to lighten their loads may allow a first-year student to drop any course at any time before the final examination.

B. Seminars, Clinic, Closed Courses, and Professional Skills Courses. A student may not withdraw from any seminar, closed course, clinic, or professional skills course after the first full week of class without the permission of the instructor concerned and the Dean or his or her designee. A faculty member may further limit the time for withdrawal from a seminar, clinic, or professional skills course with the prior approval of the Academic Affairs Committee. Notice of such further limitation shall be communicated to the students in the preregistration materials.

C. Other Second-year and Third-year Courses in the J.D. Program. A student may withdraw, without prejudice, from any second- or third-year course in the J.D. program, including multiple semester courses other than those set out in sub-paragraph B above, by notifying the Associate Dean or his or her designee prior to the commencement of the seventh week of the term in which the course is commenced. After the commencement of the seventh week of the term in which the course is commenced, a student may withdraw from the course only with the permission of the instructor concerned and the Associate Dean or his or her designee. The Associate Dean or his or her designee shall not grant permission for withdrawal after the final day of regularly scheduled classes for that term. A student who withdraws from any second- or thirdyear course will be given low priority for enrollment in the same course in a subsequent term.

D. Failure to Complete Course Without Withdrawal. A student who is not officially withdrawn from a course or seminar and fails to complete the same will receive a grade of E.

E. Waiver of Withdrawal Rule. Except for those cases in which faculty or Academic Affairs Committee permission is specified, the Dean or his or her designee in the College of Law, for good cause shown, may waive any or all of the provisions of this rule.

Source: Faculty minutes, February 25, 1970, December 1, 1971, April 2, 1997, March 17, 1999, September 3, 2003, and March 1, 2012.

9.23. Withdrawal from College Noted.

Withdrawal from the College of Law shall be noted on a student’s official permanent record.

Source: Faculty minutes, April 2, 1997.

9.24. General Rule When Study Interrupted for Military Service.

It shall be the policy of the College of Law that every effort be made to salvage as much enrollment time as possible in cases involving study interruption for military service.

Source: Faculty minutes, November 12, 1969.

9.25. Readmission When First-Year Interrupted for Military Service.

A. A student who has successfully completed a first-year course prior to the interruption of his or her studies need not repeat it after readmission. With the approval of the Academic Affairs Committee, the student in the J.D. program may register for second-year courses in order to bring his or her schedule up to the required minimum number of hours.

B. A student who has completed one and one-half semesters of academic work in the first year of the J.D. program may, with the approval of the Academic Affairs Committee, be permitted to register for one or more of the courses which were interrupted, at the point of interruption or at some earlier point, in lieu of registering at the beginning of such course. In deciding whether to grant approval pursuant to this rule, the Academic Affairs Committee may consider any factors it deems relevant, including the student’s undergraduate record and LSAT score, length of time away from law school, the student’s grades in completed courses, and a change in the content of an interrupted course.

Source: Faculty minutes, February 25, 1970, March 17, 1999, and September 3, 2003.

9.26. Seminars: Requirement to Graduate from the J.D. Program.

The requirement for completion of seminar offerings shall be that at least two hours of seminar offerings shall have been completed during the second or the third year. Students are encouraged to take more than one of such offerings. Each third-year student in the J.D. program shall have priority over all second-year students in the J.D. program in enrolling in seminars. Where applications for a seminar exceed maximum enrollment, a third-year student in the J.D. program who has had one or more seminars as a second-year student shall not, because of that fact, be discriminated against in allocating openings in the seminar. Nothing in this rule affects the prerequisites, if any, that have been or may be established for a seminar.

Source: Faculty minutes, December 16, 1970, March 17, 1999, and September 3, 2003. See Rule 5-07.

9.27. Maximum Course Load for Students in the J.D. Program.

A second- or third-year student in the J.D. program may never register in J.D. coursework in excess of 17 semester hours.

A second- or third-year student in the J.D. program may register in J.D. coursework totaling 17 semester hours in one semester if at least one of the semester hours is being awarded for work on journals or moot court pursuant to Rules 10.04 and 11.01. If none of the semester hours is being awarded for journals or moot court, however, then the student may register in J.D. coursework totaling 17 semester hours only with the consent of the Dean or his or her designee.

Source: Faculty minutes, November 20, 1974, March 17, 1999, September 3, 2003 and October 4, 2012.

9.28. Independent Study Credit.

Students may undertake independent study projects under the supervision of a faculty member with the approval of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. The credit assigned to that project should be appropriate for the magnitude of the project and the quality of the work. Students may earn toward their J.D. degree no more than a total of four credit hours for 57 independent study projects unless, upon a student’s petition, the Academic Affairs Committee approves a higher number of total hours for that student.

Source: Faculty minutes, November 1, 1951, March 17, 1999, and May 5, 1999.

9.29. Repetition of Courses.

A. A student who has received a mark of E or U in a required course at this University may repeat the course for credit only as provided in University Rule 3335-7-27(A). A student who has received a mark of E or U in any other course at this University may repeat the course for credit if permission to do so has been granted by the Academic Affairs Committee and the Dean.

B. An undergraduate or professional student who has received a mark of D in a course at this University may repeat the course for credit only upon recommendation of the Academic Affairs Committee and with the approval of the Dean of his or her College.

C. An undergraduate or professional student who has received a mark of A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C or S in a course taken at this University or elsewhere may repeat the course only as an auditor, upon receipt of permission by the Dean of the College.

D. A student who has audited a course may subsequently repeat the course for credit with the permission of the Academic Affairs Committee of the College.

E. The credit hours for a repeated course shall in no case be counted more than once in meeting graduation requirements.

Source: Rule 37.09, Rules for the University Faculty, November, 1969; Faculty minutes, April 4, 1973, March 17, 1999 and February 15, 2006.

9.30. Repetition of First-year Courses in the J.D. Program, Authorization, Grade on Repetition.

A J.D. or M.S.L. student who, at the direction of, or with the permission of, the Academic Affairs Committee and the Dean or his or her designee, repeats a first-year course in the J.D. program in which the student has received a grade of D or E shall have the grade received on repetition of the course counted toward his or her accumulative point-hour average and credit hours toward graduation. The grade received the first time the course was taken shall remain on the student’s permanent record, but shall not count toward the student’s accumulative point-hour average or credit hours toward graduation.

Source: Faculty minutes, April 4, 1973, March 17, 1999, and September 3, 2003.

9.31. Repetition of Second- or Third-year Courses in the J.D. Program, Authorization, Grade on Repetition.

A J.D. or M.S.L. student who, at the direction of, or with the permission of, the Academic Affairs Committee and the Dean or his or her designee, repeats a second- or third-year course in the J.D. program shall have the grade received on his or her repetition of the course and the grade 58 received the first time the course was taken averaged for purposes of determining the student’s accumulative point-hour average.

Source: Faculty minutes, April 4, 1973, March 17, 1999, and September 3, 2003.

9.32. Retention of Course Papers by Students.

Students shall not be permitted to retain the original copy of papers submitted by them to meet course requirements. Source: Faculty minutes, March 2, 1966. 9.33. Class Recording Prohibited. No student of the College of Law shall, in any course offered by the College of Law, record in class, by any means other than handwriting or use of the computer, the content, either verbatim or in substance, of all or any part of any lecture, discussion, or demonstration, without first obtaining the approval of the instructor concerned. A computer may not be used if the instructor so informs the student.

Source: Faculty minutes, May 17, 1962, and February 17, 1993.

9.34. Sale of Class Notes Prohibited.

No student of the College of Law shall, with reference to any course offered by the College of Law, convey, for value, to any other person, whether or not a student of the College of Law, or to any organization or association, whether or not affiliated with the College of Law, any record, whether made by handwriting or by any other method or device, of the content, either verbatim, or in substance, or in outline form, of all or any part of any lecture, discussion, or demonstration, without first obtaining the approval of the instructor concerned.

Source: Faculty minutes, May 17, 1962.

9.35. Aiding or Procuring Violation of Rules 9.33 and 9.34.

No student of the College of Law shall knowingly aid or procure any other person, whether or not a student of the College of Law, or any organization or association, whether or not affiliated with the College of Law, to engage in conduct violative of Rules 9.33 and 9-34.

Source: Faculty minutes, May 17, 1962, and March 17, 1999.

9.36. Organization Violation of Rules 9-33, 9-34, and 9-35 Prohibited.

No organization or association affiliated with the College of Law shall engage in any conduct prohibited by Rules 9-33, 9-34, and 9-35.

Source: Faculty minutes, May 17, 1962, and March 17, 1999.

9.37. All-day Scheduling.

The College of Law shall adopt as a deliberate policy a schedule which will include an allday class curriculum, on all five weekdays.

Source: Faculty minutes, May 20, 1932, and March 17, 1999.

9.38. Classes to Meet Before and After Holidays.

Classes shall meet immediately before and after holidays at the regularly scheduled time.

Source: Faculty minutes, July 3, 1946, and March 17, 1999.

9.39. Review of First-year Grades in the J.D. Program.

The Dean or Associate Dean for Academic Affairs shall review all proposed grades to be given by first-year instructors in first-year courses in the J.D. program to ensure substantial compliance with the College’s grading profile and if, in the opinion of the Dean or Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, a meeting of first-year instructors is necessary, such a meeting shall be held prior to the posting of any grades for first-year students.

Source: Faculty minutes, November 7, 1963, March 17, 1999, and September 3, 2003.

9.40. Substantial Compliance with First-Year Profile by Visiting and Adjunct Professors.

The Dean shall not assign a visiting faculty member or an adjunct faculty member to teach a course in the first-year of the J.D. curriculum unless the Dean has previously described to such faculty member the College first-year grading profile and secured the agreement of the faculty member to seek to achieve substantial compliance with that profile in the grading of the course.

Source: Faculty meeting, September 5, 1984 and September 3, 2003.

9.41. Classroom Blackboard Notices Prohibited.

Classroom blackboards will not be used to post notices, advertisements, or announcements. Source: Faculty minutes, January 10, 1979. 9.42. Summer Sessions of College. The College of Law shall conduct a summer session each year on as broad a basis as student demand and fiscal circumstances allow.

Source: Faculty minutes, November 7, 1919, and March 17, 1999.

9.43. Credit for Summer Sessions at Other Colleges.

Students of the College of Law may take courses in a summer school program of a college of law accredited by both the American Bar Association and The Association of American Law Schools with the approval of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. Work completed at a level of D or above in approved courses shall be accepted as credit toward the J.D. by the College. A student receiving a grade of C or better shall receive a grade of “satisfactory” (K) on the records of the College and University for the work completed. A student receiving a grade of D shall receive a grade of D on the records of the College and University and the grade of D shall be computed in the student’s cumulative grade point average. Credit for work completed at a C level or above in summer school or at the summer term of a foreign institution with high academic standards shall be received only upon compliance with the process established in Faculty Rule 9.46.

Source: Faculty minutes, May 29, 1907, April 26, 1978, October 18, 1978, April 14, 1993, May 3, 1995, and March 17, 1999.

9.44. Permission for Transiency Credit Other Than During Summer Sessions.

A student of the College of Law may request permission to take courses as a transient student at another law school accredited or provisionally accredited by the American Bar Association. Permission for a single semester of transiency may be obtained from the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. Permission for a period of transiency study to exceed a single semester must be obtained from the Academic Affairs Committee. The transfer of credit from such other law school shall be subject to preliminary approval by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs to ascertain that credit is not provided for undue overlap with courses already taken at The Ohio State University College of Law. Work completed at a level of D or above in approved courses shall be accepted as credit toward the J.D. degree. A student receiving a grade of C or better shall receive a grade of “satisfactory” (K) on the records of the College and University for the work completed. A student receiving a grade of D shall receive a grade of D on the records of the College and University and the grade of D shall be computed in the student’s cumulative grade point average. For transiency credit from a foreign institution with high academic standards, the petition shall be approved only upon compliance with the process established in Faculty Rule 9.46.

Source: Faculty minutes, April 26, 1978, October 18, 1978, April 14, 1993, May 3, 1995, March 17, 1999, and November 15, 2000.

9.45. Process for Approving Credit for Legal Education at a Foreign Institution with High Academic Standards.

The general educational objective in allowing students to study abroad for academic credit is to enrich the students’ legal education by adding a rigorous and rewarding international experience. To ensure that the experience merits credit and to establish the appropriate level of that credit, the Academic Affairs Committee upon petition by a student of the College, who has completed in good standing at least the first year of full-time study, may approve up to 29 semester hours credit for legal education at a foreign institution with high academic standards. This credit limit does not apply to a program of foreign study that has received specific approval from the faculty. The petition shall contain:

(A) A written agreement by a faculty member of this College with the student’s specific educational objectives and coursework and acceptance by that faculty member of responsibility for (I) supervising the student, including a requirement for an adequate amount of written student work for that supervision, and (II) monitoring the academic program at the foreign institution;

(B) A statement from the Dean or a faculty member that the foreign institution has faculty members with academic credentials equivalent to the members of this College’s faculty;

(C) A statement describing both the general academic program at the foreign institution and the specific courses for which credit is being sought, including the methodology of those courses, which must meet the same academic standards as those of the College, and indicating that the foreign institution is government-sanctioned or otherwise accredited by an appropriate entity;

(D) A statement of specific educational objectives, accompanied by assurances from the foreign institution that those objectives can be accomplished and designation by the foreign institution of a resident faculty member who will serve as an on-site supervisor of the student;

(E) For each course, a statement indicating (I) the anticipated hours of direct faculty instruction; (II) descriptions of and time estimates for assigned reading; (III) descriptions of and time estimates for other out-of-class work; and (IV) hours allotted to a final examination or other final assessment.

(F) A statement that the coursework at the foreign institution is in English or that the student is sufficiently fluent in the foreign language to understand the coursework; and

(G) A statement of the residency and class attendance requirements of the foreign institution, and a commitment from the student to comply with either those requirements or the requirements of this College, whichever are greater.

Upon review of the petition the Committee shall determine whether to grant the petition and, if so, for how many semester hours credit. The Committee may set the number of semester hours by considering the number of hours the equivalent amount of coursework, using comparable methodology, would be awarded at the College. In no case will the Committee allow more credit hours than permitted by Rule 9.52. Credit shall be further conditioned on compliance with the requirements of the American Bar Association.

Source: Faculty minutes, April 14, 1993, March 17, 1999, May 5, 1999, October 5, 2017, and March 1, 2018.

9.46. Credit, Non-curricular Courses.

To provide opportunities for interdisciplinary training:

A. Graduate students not otherwise enrolled in the College of Law shall be permitted, with the consent of the instructor concerned, to take a course or a seminar in the College of Law:

(1) Law faculty members permitting graduate students to enroll in their College of Law courses may, in their discretion, grade such students on any of the following bases:

(a) Grade–law school standards; or

(b) Grade–graduate school standards, on a scale equivalent to that in Rule 3.09(e).

(2) Law faculty members are encouraged, but not required, to offer each graduate student a choice between the two bases set out in sub-section (1) above. In any event, each attending graduate student shall be informed of the grading standard applicable to him or her before the student is permitted to enroll in the course.

(3) Graduate school grading standards shall be determined by the concerned law faculty member by consulting with the chairman of the graduate department in which the student to which such standards are to be applied is enrolled. If a graduate student is to be graded according to graduate school standards in a law course, such course shall not constitute credit towards a law degree should the student later enroll in law school. An appropriate notation of the applicable grading standard shall be made on the student’s transcript, and the student shall be informed that law courses graded under graduate school standards will not count as credit toward a law degree.

(4) Teachers of College of Law courses who are willing to open enrollment in their courses, pursuant to Faculty Rule 9.46(A), to graduate students from other departments, shall inform the committee charged with responsibility for Interdisciplinary Programs, which will obtain approval of such courses for graduate credit from the graduate school and the Council on Academic Affairs.

B. Law students shall be permitted to enroll in courses and seminars offered outside the College up to a total of five semester hours credit provided:

(1) The student desiring to take such a course or seminar presents a petition so to enroll to a law faculty member. Where practicable, the faculty member to whom the petition is presented shall be familiar with the area in question.

(2) The petition shall contain adequate data concerning the course or seminar, including reading lists and other requirements of the course, to demonstrate why the course is useful and relevant to the student’s professional interests, to establish that there is no unacceptable overlap with offerings available in the College of Law, and to demonstrate that the requested credit hours comply with Faculty Rule 9.52.

(3) The law faculty member certifies in writing that the course or seminar will be useful and relevant to the student’s professional interests, that there is no unacceptable overlap with offerings available in the College of Law, and that the requested credit hours 63 comply with Faculty Rule 9.52.

(4) The petition is approved by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

(5) Courses and seminars so approved shall count toward fulfillment of the College’s hour requirement for graduation if: (a) the faculty member who approved the course or seminar under paragraph 3 above, reviews the student’s participation in such course or seminar at least once each term and determines that in its actual operation it is achieving its educational objective and that the credit allowed is consistent with Rule 9.52; and (b) the student receives a passing grade in the course or seminar. However, grades earned in such courses or seminars shall not be included in computing the student’s cumulative point-hour grade in the College of Law.

(6) Approved petitions and statements required pursuant to paragraph (5) above, shall be maintained in the College of Law files of the petitioning students. Copies of approved and disapproved petitions and statements required pursuant to paragraph (5) above shall be maintained by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

Source: Faculty minutes, April 30, 1969, April 5, 1972, June 6, 1973, March 17, 1999, September 3, 2003, September 6, 2012, and October 5, 2017.

9.47. Professional Responsibility, Orientation.

Approximately one hour of the orientation program for first-year students in the J.D. program shall be devoted to instruction by a faculty member in problems of professional responsibility.

Source: Faculty minutes, May 9, 1973 and September 3, 2003.

9.48. Grades — When Due.

Final grades in all courses shall be submitted promptly after the completion of the course. Faculty members should make every effort to submit final grades within 21 days of the scheduled date for the final examination or scheduled date of submission for final student work. In all courses, final grades shall be submitted within 35 days of the scheduled date for the final examination or scheduled date of submission for final student work, unless exceptional circumstances have been discussed with the Dean and require extension.

Source: Faculty minutes, October 6, 1993.

9.49. Co-Curricular Activity.

A. A co-curricular activity is an activity other than a course or independent study for which academic credit may be earned.

B. First-year students in the J.D. program are ineligible to engage in or compete for selection to a co-curricular activity prior to the completion of their second semester examinations; however, they may attend informational meetings regarding such co-curricular activity during 64 their first year.

Source: Faculty minutes, September 24, 1997 and September 3, 2003.

9.50. Grade of Incomplete.

When a grade of “I” is awarded, the faculty member shall set a date certain by which the work must be completed and communicate that date to the student and to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. The date certain shall be no later than the end of the examination period of the semester following the semester in which the course was offered. If the work remains incomplete after the scheduled date, the professor will then replace the grade of “I” with a grade of “A” through “E” (in a pass-fail course, “S” or “U”).

Source: Faculty minutes, May 5, 1999.

9.51. Enrollment in Clinical Practicum.

Students may enroll in more than one clinical practicum during a single semester only in exceptional circumstances and with the prior approval of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. The Associate Dean or the Dean’s designee will make the determination in consultation with the instructors of each clinical practicum in which the student seeks to be enrolled.

Source: Faculty minutes, April 4, 2007.

9.52. Policy for Determining Credit Hours Awarded for Academic Work.

A. The College of Law adheres to ABA Standards in determining the number of credit hours awarded for coursework. ABA Standard 310(b) provides:

A “credit hour” is an amount of work that reasonably approximates:

(1) not less than one hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and two hours of out-of-class student work per week for fifteen weeks, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time; or

(2) at least an equivalent amount of work as required in subparagraph (1) of this definition for other academic activities as established by the institution, including simulation, field placement, clinical, co-curricular, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours.

B. ABA Interpretation 310-1clarifies that:

(1) the fifteen-week period may include one week of exam period;

(2) fifty minutes suffices for one “hour” of classroom or direct faculty instruction; and

(3) sixty minutes are required to constitute an “hour” of out-of-class student work.

C. In accordance with Standard 310, the College of Law awards one unit of credit for an amount of academic work that reasonably approximates:

(1) at least 750 minutes of classroom or direct faculty instruction (including examinations) plus 1800 minutes of out-of-class student work, for a total time of 42.5 hours per credit; or

(2) at least 45 hours of academic work completed outside the classroom without direct faculty instruction; or

(3) any other combination of direct faculty instruction and out-of-class work that satisfies the guidelines articulated in sections A and B above.

These requirements apply to academic work that extends over any period of time, including semester-long courses, short courses, and summer session courses. They also apply to distance education courses.

D. Any new course proposal must include a paragraph describing the anticipated workload and offering a reasonable estimate of the hours that students will devote to the course. As appropriate to the course, this description should include:

(1) anticipated hours of direct faculty instruction;

(2) descriptions of and time estimates for assigned reading;

(3) descriptions of and time estimates for other out-of-class work; and

(4) hours allotted to a final examination or other final assessment.

The Academic Affairs Committee and faculty will consider this information when reviewing the proposed course. The Committee will recommend, and the faculty will determine, the appropriate credit hours for the proposed course.

Source: Faculty minutes, October 5, 2017.

9.53. Periodic Review of Credit Hours Awarded in Established Courses.

A. When an instructor teaches an established course, the instructor will provide the following information for the planned course:

(1) anticipated hours of direct faculty instruction;

(2) descriptions of and time estimates for assigned reading;

(3) descriptions of and time estimates for other out-of-class work; and

(4) hours allotted to a final examination or other final assessment. The instructor will also attest that the planned course offering complies with the College of Law guidelines articulated in Faculty Rule 9.52.

B. The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will review the information provided under subsection A and, if the Associate Dean believes that work done in a course does not match the credit hours awarded, will work with the instructor to adjust the credit hours or workload. Any change in credit hours for an established course must be reviewed by the Academic Affairs Committee and approved by the faculty.

C. To inform estimates made by instructors under subsection A, as well as the review conducted by the Associate Dean under subsection B:

(1) The Associate Dean or their designee will periodically prepare reports aggregating workload data from course information submitted by instructors. The Associate Dean will share those aggregate reports with instructors to promote understanding and discussion of academic workloads at the College of Law.

(2) Each academic year, the Academic Affairs Committee will solicit student input on the overall academic workload at the College of Law. The committee may solicit that input from student representatives on the committee, surveys, focus groups, or any other means it finds appropriate.

(3) The Academic Affairs Committee will sponsor, as appropriate, an annual faculty-wide discussion about academic workloads. These discussions may include review of aggregate data from the Standard 310 forms, presentations by experts, or other materials designed to inform faculty pedagogy.

Source: Faculty minutes, October 5, 2017.

9.54. Documentation of Hours.

If a student seeks academic credit for an independent study project (Faculty Rule 9.28), an externship (Faculty Rule 5.03.B), work in the lawyering skills program (Faculty Rule 10.04), or work on a College of Law journal (Faculty Rule 11.01), the student must keep a regular timesheet recording the amount of time spent and nature of the activity. The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will assure that faculty supervisors/advisors and students have developed regular timekeeping practices for these activities. To receive academic credit, students must submit their timesheets to the activity’s faculty supervisor or advisor at the end of the semester. The faculty supervisor or advisor will certify to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs that the credits sought comply with Faculty Rule 9.52. Students, however, may not receive more credit for these activities than the amounts specified in Faculty Rules 9.28, 5.03.B, 10.04, and 11.01.

Source: Faculty minutes, October 5, 2017.

 

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