CHAPTER 5 – GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

5.01. Residence Requirement for the J.D. Degree.

A. In order to graduate with a J.D. degree, a student must complete six semesters or the equivalent in full-time residence in the College of Law, extending over a period of not less than ninety weeks.

B. A student in the J.D. program taking ten semester hours or more of work in courses scheduled in the College of Law in any one semester, excluding a summer session, shall be considered to have been in residence for one full semester. A single summer session cannot be considered the equivalent of a full-time semester, regardless of the number of hours taken during that session. Study abroad may count for the residence requirement if the student receives permission from the Academic Affairs Committee.

C. If a student takes fewer than ten semester hours of work in courses scheduled in the College of Law during any semester or summer session, each hour shall count as one tenth of a full semester for purposes of determining whether the full semester requirements for graduation are met. However, no more than three sessions (semester or summer session) may be aggregated during a student’s law school career for purposes of meeting the full semester requirements for graduation, and students seeking to aggregate semesters or sessions of fewer than 10 hours to more than one full semester must secure the approval of the Academic Affairs Committee.

Source: Faculty minutes, March 27, 1974, November 3, 1993, March 17, 1999, and September 3, 2003.

5.02. Residence Requirement, Transfer Students into the J.D. Program.

For transfer students admitted with advanced standing to the J.D. program, the residence requirement will be reduced proportionately. However, a student must complete their last four semesters in residence at the College, unless the student receives permission from the Academic Affairs Committee to waive this requirement.

Source: Rules contained in College of Law catalog since 1958-59, amended faculty minutes, March 17, 1999 and September 3, 2003.

5.03. Curriculum Requirements for the J.D. Program.

A. In order to graduate with a J.D. degree, a student must obtain a passing grade in not fewer than 88 credit hours of courses, including all required courses. 70 of these credits must be awarded in courses which qualify for credit under Rule 304(b) of the ABA Standards and Rules of Procedure for Approval of Law Schools. For students in dual degree programs, only 67 of these credits must be earned in such courses.

B. Students may apply up to eight non-graded externship credits toward the minimum number of credits required for graduation.

Source: Faculty minutes, November 2, 1966, May 31, 1972, December 6, 1978, March 13, 1992, December 6, 1996, March 17, 1999, September 3, 2003, February 2, 2012, and March 1, 2012.

5.04. Required Courses for the J.D. Program.

The following courses are required for the J.D. degree:

A. LAW I and LAW II

B. Torts

C. Civil Procedure I

D. Criminal Law

E. Property

F. Contracts I

G. Legislation & Regulation

H. Constitutional Law;

I. Either Appellate Advocacy or Transactional Practice; and

J. A course that the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs has designated as meeting the professional responsibility requirement.

In addition, in order to graduate with a J.D. degree, a student must fulfill the experiential and simulation courses requirement described in Rule 5.05 and the seminar requirement described in Rule 5.06. Students who begin their first JD year at the Moritz College of Law after July 2018 must complete two credits of work in the Legal Practice and Perspectives Program.

Source: Faculty minutes, January 24, 1963, April 10, 1974, November 10, 1974, September 3, 2003, March 1, 2012, and November 2, 2017.

5.05 Experiential and Simulation Courses Requirement.

In order to graduate with a J.D. degree, a student must earn a total of six credits from designated experiential and simulation course work.

A. The required first year course of Legal Analysis and Writing II counts towards this requirement.

B. The required second year course of Appellate Advocacy or Transactional Practice counts towards this requirement.

C. A student must earn the remainder of the required experiential or simulation course credits from a list of courses designated by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs shall designate a course as an experiential or simulation course if it meets the experiential or simulation course definition under applicable ABA requirements. The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or any faculty member may refer questions concerning whether a course should be designated as an experiential course to the Academic Affairs Committee.

D. If a J.D. candidate completed their first year of law school at another institution, the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or their designee shall review the courses taken by the student and determine how many credits from those courses satisfy the requirements of this rule.

Source: Faculty minutes, March 1, 1995, March 17, 1999, September 3, 2003, March 7, 2013, and January 14, 2016.

5.06. Seminar and Writing/Skills Requirements.

A. In order to graduate with a J.D. degree, a student must obtain a passing grade in a seminar for at least two hours of credit.

B. The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will designate a course a seminar only if the course involves a rigorous writing experience with formative feedback and substantial small-group discussion. The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or any faculty member may refer questions concerning whether a course may qualify as a seminar to the Academic Affairs Committee.

C. A student may not use the same course to satisfy both the Seminar requirement of this rule and the Experiential and Simulated Courses requirement under Rule 5.05 or the Professional Responsibility Instruction requirement under Rule 5.04.

Source: Faculty minutes, May 14, 1969, December 16, 1970, May 31, 1972, June 1, 1983, February 27, 1985, April 17, 1985, March 17, 1999, April 18, 2001, September 3, 2003, and January 14, 2016. See also Rule 9.27.

5.07. Minimum Cumulative Average for the J.D. Degree.

A student is eligible to graduate with a J.D. degree only if the student has completed their first and second year course work with a cumulative average of not less than 2.0, and, in addition, has completed their third-year course work with cumulative average of not less than 2.0 in the third year.

Source: Faculty minutes, November 2, 1966, March 17, 1999, and September 3, 2003.

5.08. Ineligibility Upon Failing Courses.

A student may not graduate with a J.D. degree if they have failed more than two courses in any one year or if they have failed more than three courses during the student’s entire work in the College of Law. For purposes of this rule, a failure is a “E” in a graded course or a “U” in an ungraded course, independent study, or co-curricular activity.

Source: Faculty minutes, November 2, 1966, March 17, 1999, and September 3, 2003.

5.09. Graduation only in June and December.

The College of Law shall graduate students only in June and December of each year.

Source: Faculty minutes, January 8, 1953.

5.10. Ranking of Students Completing Requirements in Summer Session.

All students completing the requirements for graduation during summer of any year shall, for ranking purposes, be considered a member of the class to be graduated the ensuing December and June.

Source: Faculty minutes, April 21, 1939, May 26, 1971, and March 17, 1999.

5.11. Maximum Period of Enrollment for J.D. Degree.

A. A student must complete the requirements for the J.D. degree within a maximum of seven semesters of enrollment. This requirement does not apply to a student enrolled in a dual degree program.

B. A student must complete the requirements for the J.D. program within a maximum of five calendar years from the date of first matriculation in the College of Law.

C. The Academic Affairs Committee can grant an exception to (A) or (B) if good cause is shown.

Source: Faculty minutes, April 12, 1978, March 17, 1999, and September 3, 2003.

 

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