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Guides

 

 

Simulations

The Springton University SimulationSprington University was designed to simulate division on campus.  Designed and tested in 2020 at the Moritz College of Law, DCP intends to use Springton University with campus and university leaders at upcoming events.  The general facts are available hereThe following documents are available upon request (they contain confidential information) to DCP Deputy Director Bill Froehlich (froehlich.28@osu.edu):

 

  • Facilitator Instructions for working with community leaders
  • Facilitator Instructions for working with students
  • Facilitator Instructions for working online
  • The complete simulation, including all confidential roles, “injects” and a corresponding PowerPoint

 

Short Hypothetical Situations

College and university leaders’ decisions and actions can be pivotal during this period of polarization in our public national life and increasing campus conflicts and divisive incidents. With much at stake, preparation is vital to making wise choices in the immediate aftermath of a divisive incident or conflict. Wayne Maines, Vice President, Safety and Operations, Austin Community College, explained that he uses examples of campus conflict or crisis from another institution to engage everyone in the regular cabinet meeting in a 10-minute “what if ” scenario where they are asked to talk about how they would respond if confronted with similar facts. The practice of regularly talking about how they would respond has helped clarify roles, identify areas of need, and improve crisis preparedness.

The Divided Community Project has created several short hypothetical fact patterns that anyone can use.

Community Leaders Checklist

 

Community leaders who are trusted by their communities have the opportunity to become sources of accurate information, reminders of what is at stake, and agents of helping the communities within the larger community understand each other.  Playing this role may be crucial during polarized times, especially when the public receives conflicting information from public officials and social media sources, and fears/anger run high on issues regarding race and equity, covid19, and rumors about election fraud. This is a checklist of considerations relating to speaking out to the general public during tense and divisive times.

 

Guides

 

Case Studies

Rochester’s Community Response Team

  • Study 1 illustrates the work of the Rochester Community Response Team, an effort launched through the work of a local dispute resolution center and a local newspaper, which began developing plans for a collective community response to civil unrest.

Orlando Speaks

  • Study 2 describes Orlando Speaks, a new approach to police-community dialogue developed through a partnership between the City of Orlando, the Orlando Police Department, and Valencia College Peace and Justice Institute.

Strengthening Communities Project

  • Study 3 discusses the Peninsula Conflict Resolution Center’s Strengthening Communities Project, convened by a non-profit dispute resolution center in San Mateo County, California.

Columbus Community Trust

  • Study 4 highlights the work of the volunteer Columbus Community Trust, convened with support from the Columbus Bar Association and the John Mercer Langston Bar Association, with support from the local U.S. Attorney’s office.

Unity in the Community-San Leandro

  • Study 5 describes Unity in the Community-San Leandro, a group of San Leandro (California) volunteers who convened in response to a series of local hate incidents.

 

Cards

Designed as an easy reference point for community leaders:

 

Simulations

The Midland Simulation.  Used with hundreds of civic leaders and students across the country, the simulation focuses leaders on strategies for broad-based community planning efforts, while giving students the chance to enhance leadership skills during a crisis.  Here are the simulation’s Midland General Facts.

The following documents are available upon request (they contain confidential information) to DCP Deputy Director Bill Froehlich (froehlich.28@osu.edu):

  • Facilitator Instructions for working with community leaders
  • Facilitator Instructions for working with students
  • The complete simulation, including all confidential roles, “injects” and a corresponding PowerPoint

In this video, Columbus Mayor Andrew Ginther describes his experience with the simulation.

The New Lake Simulation. Modeled after MidlandNew Lake has been used with a law student at the Moritz College of Law.  Here are the simulation’s general facts.

The following documents are available upon request (they contain confidential information) to DCP Deputy Director Bill Froehlich (froehlich.28@osu.edu):

  • Facilitator Instructions
  • The complete simulation, including all confidential roles, and a PowerPoint to use with the simulation
 
Academy Facilitation Guide

A guide for hosting a three-day training “Academy” for community leaders.  This guide includes links to documents, surveys and materials used at DCP’s Academy Initiative events.

 

The following guides are currently available in PDF Format.  In Summer 2020, these resources will be available online as step-by-step guides for use in communities, on campus, and in the classroom.  The step-by-step guides will include text and video snippets.

For community leaders and dispute resolution professors:

For campus leaders and dispute resolution professors:

 
Case Studies

Rochester’s Community Response Team

  • Study 1 illustrates the work of the Rochester Community Response Team, an effort launched through the work of a local dispute resolution center and a local newspaper, which began developing plans for a collective community response to civil unrest.

Orlando Speaks

  • Study 2 describes Orlando Speaks, a new approach to police-community dialogue developed through a partnership between the City of Orlando, the Orlando Police Department, and Valencia College Peace and Justice Institute.

Strengthening Communities Project

  • Study 3 discusses the Peninsula Conflict Resolution Center’s Strengthening Communities Project, convened by a non-profit dispute resolution center in San Mateo County, California.

Columbus Community Trust

  • Study 4 highlights the work of the volunteer Columbus Community Trust, convened with support from the Columbus Bar Association and the John Mercer Langston Bar Association, with support from the local U.S. Attorney’s office.

Unity in the Community-San Leandro

  • Study 5 describes Unity in the Community-San Leandro, a group of San Leandro (California) volunteers who convened in response to a series of local hate incidents.

 

Simulations

The Midland Simulation.  Used with hundreds of civic leaders and students across the country, the simulation focuses leaders on strategies for broad-based community planning efforts, while giving students the chance to enhance leadership skills during a crisis.  Here are the simulation’s Midland General Facts.

The following documents are available upon request (they contain confidential information) to DCP Deputy Director Bill Froehlich (froehlich.28@osu.edu):

  • Facilitator Instructions for working with community leaders
  • Facilitator Instructions for working with students
  • The complete simulation, including all confidential roles, “injects” and a corresponding PowerPoint

In this video, Columbus Mayor Andrew Ginther describes his experience with the simulation.

The New Lake Simulation. Modeled after MidlandNew Lake has been used with a law student at the Moritz College of Law.  Here are the simulation’s general facts.

The following documents are available upon request (they contain confidential information) to DCP Deputy Director Bill Froehlich (froehlich.28@osu.edu):

  • Facilitator Instructions
  • The complete simulation, including all confidential roles, and a PowerPoint to use with the simulation

 

The Springton University SimulationSprington University was designed to simulate division on campus.  Designed and tested in 2020 at the Moritz College of Law, DCP intends to use Springton University with campus and university leaders at upcoming events.  The general facts are available hereThe following documents are available upon request (they contain confidential information) to DCP Deputy Director Bill Froehlich (froehlich.28@osu.edu):

 

  • Facilitator Instructions for working with community leaders
  • Facilitator Instructions for working with students
  • Facilitator Instructions for working online
  • The complete simulation, including all confidential roles, “injects” and a corresponding PowerPoint

 

Video Series

The following video clips were developed to pair with concepts identified in DCP’s Key Considerations and Planning in Advance of Community Unrest.  Thanks to Thomas Battles, Susan Carpenter, Michael Lewis, Becky Monroe, Linda Seely, and Andrew Thomas for their work on this project and research assistants Salvia Jannat, Jason Ketchum, Julia Sivertson, and Kassie Stewart.

 

Short Tools for Post-Election Conversations

Thanks to Sara Childers, Kathleen Hallihan, Mark Sullivan, and Richard Martin for their suggestions.

A shortlist of ideas for post-election conversations 

This card offers ideas for post-election conversations with someone who voted differently than you did – ideas that promote mutual understanding.

PRESENTATION: Unpacking the Presidential Election – Can We Talk? 

This presentation further illustrates ideas for post-election conversations.  Nine interdisciplinary leaders from the Ohio State community quickly highlight one productive way to engaged in a difficult conversation.  Designed for Ohio State students, the principles discussed in this video will resonate broadly with many communities.

DCP Campus Leaders Post-Election Checklist

University leaders have an opportunity post-election to become trusted sources of accurate information, to remind students, faculty, staff, the “Buckeye Nation,” and the central Ohio community about common values, and to bridge differences to build understanding. The public tends to trust their integrity and non-partisan approach.  This card offers a checklist of considerations for campus leaders. 

Links to Additional Ohio State Resources

Publications by those teaching at Ohio State University

 Joseph B. Stulberg, and Lela Love, The Middle Voice (3rd ed. 2020).

 Mark SullivanTHRIVE: When Trouble Visits! Being Your Best In Tough Times (2020).

Steven Goldberg, Frank E.A. Sander, Sarah R. Cole, and Nancy H. RogersDispute Resolution: Negotiation, Mediation, Arbitration and Other Processes (7th ed. 2020).

Ellen Deason, Edward Brunet & Charles B. Craver, Alternative Dispute Resolution: The Advocate’s Perspective (5th ed. 2016).

Ohio State University courses:

 Implicit bias training online:  OSU Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity, https://kirwaninstitute.osu.edu/implicit-bias-training

Free webinar on “How to Have Difficult Conversations about Race,” from OSU Adjunct Professor Kwame Christian, https://americannegotiationinstitute.com

Crucial Conversations, BUSMHR #7236, OSU Fisher College of Business

Purpose: To cultivate tools and practices to constructively engage differing others and associated conversations when:

  • Stakes are high
  • Opinions vary
  • Emotions run strong

Version Offered: Course and Workshop Format

  • 15 Week, 3 credit graduate level (see syllabus attached)
  • 4 hour, 8 hour, 16 hour certificate and non-certificate version through the Fisher Executive Education and the MHR Dept.; Licensed and Certified Faculty
  • Mark Sullivan (Graduate and Executive Level)
  • Sarah Mangia (Undergraduate Level)

Legal Negotiations, OSU Moritz College of Law for law students or with permission

 Easy-to-read manuals:

 Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton, and Sheila Heen, Difficult Conversations (1999).

Roger Fisher, William Ury, and Bruce Patton, Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (2nd ed. 1991).

Patterson, R. McMillan, J. Grenny and A. Switzler, Crucial Conversations (2012).

Caleb Benson, Emotional Intelligence: Improving Mindset, Stress, Anger Management, Relationships, and Social Intelligence (EI 2.0, Book 1)

Maggie Herzig & Laura Chasin, Fostering Dialogue Across Divides: A Nuts and Bolts Guide From the Public Conversations Project (Public Conversations Project 2006).

Reporting harassment and discrimination at The Ohio State University

Creating an environment free from harassment, discrimination, and sexual misconduct

The Ohio State University is committed to building and maintaining a community to reflect diversity and to improve opportunities for all. All Buckeyes have the right to be free from harassment, discrimination, and sexual misconduct. Ohio State does not discriminate on the basis of age, ancestry, color, disability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity or expression, genetic information, HIV/AIDS status, military status, national origin, pregnancy (childbirth, false pregnancy, termination of pregnancy, or recovery therefrom), race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, or protected veteran status, or any other bases under the law, in its activities, academic programs, admission, and employment. Members of the university community also have the right to be free from all forms of sexual misconduct: sexual harassment, sexual assault, relationship violence, stalking, and sexual exploitation.

To report harassment, discrimination, sexual misconduct, or retaliation and/or seek confidential and non-confidential resources and supportive measures, contact the Office of Institutional Equity:
1. Online – reporting form at equity.osu.edu,
2. Call – 614-247-5838 or TTY 614-688-8605,
3. Or Email – equity@osu.edu

The university is committed to stopping sexual misconduct, preventing its recurrence, eliminating any hostile environment, and remedying its discriminatory effects. All university employees have reporting responsibilities to the Office of Institutional Equity to ensure the university can take appropriate action:

  • All university employees, except those exempted by legal privilege of confidentiality or expressly identified as a confidential reporter, have an obligation to report incidents of sexual assault immediately.
  • The following employees have an obligation to report all other forms of sexual misconduct as soon as practicable but at most within five workdays of becoming aware of such information: 1. Any human resource professional (HRP); 2. Anyone who supervises faculty, staff, students, or volunteers; 3. Chair/director; and 4. Faculty member.

For counseling resources at The Ohio State University:

Buckeye PAL (Peer Access Line)

Student Life Student Wellness Center offers a new university initiative, the Buckeye Peer Access Line (PAL). The PAL is a non-emergency talk line that provides a space for students to engage in brief phone conversations to gain support and learn about campus resources. Student volunteers are available to provide peer-to-peer assistance that promotes and enhances student development and wellbeing.

Students can contact the PAL at 614-514-3333 about a variety of topics; including but not limited to the following:

  • Adjusting to college and university life
  • Balancing stress management
  • Managing platonic, romantic and family relationships
  • Feeling pressure to succeed
  • Navigating personal and social identities

Buckeye PAL operates weekdays from 8 p.m. to midnight when classes are in session during fall and spring semesters. Call 614-514-3333 or visit go.osu.edu/buckeyepal.

A short list of ideas for post-election conversations

This card offers ideas for post-election conversations between individuals who might have voted for different parties or candidates – ideas which promote mutual understanding.

In addition, the card offers a list of simple resources for difficult post-election conversations.

PRESENTATION: Unpacking the Presidential Election – Can We Talk? 

This presentation further illustrates ideas for post-election conversations.  Nine interdisciplinary leaders from the Ohio State community quickly highlight one productive way to engaged in a difficult conversation.  Designed for Ohio State students, the principles discussed in this video will resonate broadly with many communities.

DCP Campus Leaders Post-Election Checklist

University leaders have an opportunity post-election to become trusted sources of accurate information, to remind students, faculty, staff, and their community about common values, and to bridge differences to build understanding. The public tends to trust their integrity and non-partisan approach.  This card offers a checklist of considerations for campus leaders.

Easy-to-read manuals and online resources:

Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton, and Sheila Heen, Difficult Conversations (1999).

Roger Fisher, William Ury, and Bruce Patton, Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (2nd ed. 1991).

Patterson, R. McMillan, J. Grenny and A. Switzler, Crucial Conversations (2012).

Mark Sullivan, THRIVE; When Trouble Visits! Being Your Best in Tough Times (2020).

Caleb Benson, Emotional Intelligence: Improving Mindset, Stress, Anger Management, Relationships, and Social Intelligence (EI 2.0, Book 1)

Maggie Herzig & Laura Chasin, Fostering Dialogue Across Divides: A Nuts and Bolts Guide From the Public Conversations Project (Public Conversations Project 2006).

Free webinar on “How to Have Difficult Conversations about Race,” from OSU Adjunct Professor Kwame Christian, https://americannegotiationinstitute.com

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