2020 Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recent Events

2021 Distinguished Lecture

April 9, 2021

Walking the Walk on AI Ethics: How to Align Tech Companies’ AI Ethics Commitments with Civil and Human Rights Ideals
Distinguished Lecturer: Deirdre Mulligan
Commentator: Nuala O’Connor

A recording of the Zoom Webinar is available on YouTube. The video is supported with closed captioning for accessibility.

The Program on Data and Governance is honored to host Deirdre Mulligan and Nuala O’Connor for its 5th annual Distinguished Lecture.


About the Event

After a flood of stories about the biased, and at times discriminatory, outputs of AI systems, technology companies have sought to frame themselves as sensitive to diversity, equity and inclusion and as creators of responsible and just AI. But are they?

Berkeley Professor Deirdre Mulligan will explore how companies talk about diversity and inclusion in AI ethics work, and assess what those statements suggest about the relationship between AI ethics initiatives and civil rights ideals. She will show that, while companies do discuss diversity and inclusion in ways that are digestible for engineers and tractable in data science work, their commitments tend to drift away from the civil and human rights principles on which they are based. Companies need to put AI ethics more directly in conversation with, and in the service of, civil rights and human rights ideals.

Nuala O’Connor, Chief Counsel for Digital Citizenship at Walmart, will comment on the lecture.

Distinguished Lecturer: Deirdre Mulligan

Deirdre K. Mulligan is a Professor in the School of Information at UC Berkeley, a Faculty Director of the Berkeley Center for Law & Technology, and a co-organizer of the Algorithmic Fairness & Opacity Working Group. Her research explores legal and technical means of protecting values such as privacy, freedom of expression, and fairness in emerging technical systems. Her book, Privacy on the Ground: Driving Corporate Behavior in the United States and Europe, a study of privacy practices in large corporations in five countries, conducted with UC Berkeley Law Prof. Kenneth Bamberger was published by MIT Press.

Commentator: Nuala O’Connor

Photo of Nuala O'ConnorNuala O’Connor is the Senior Vice President and Chief Counsel, Digital Citizenship at Walmart. Before joining Walmart, she served as the President and CEO of the Center for Democracy and Technology. In the private sector, Nuala served as both Vice President of Compliance and Customer Trust and Associate General Counsel for Privacy and Data Protection at Amazon, was the Chief Privacy Leader at General Electric, and held both privacy leadership and legal counsel roles at DoubleClick. In the public sector, Nuala served as the first Chief Privacy Officer at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS).


Law & Policy for the Quantum Age

February 12, 2021

This event is a part of the 2020-2021 Program on Data and Governance’s Data Points Lecture Series, sponsored by Porter Wright Morris & Arthur LLP.

Friday, February 12

 

RECORDING of the Zoom Webinar.

Video is supported with closed captioning for accessibility.


About the Event

Quantum technologies have provided capabilities that seem strange, are powerful, and at times, frightening. These capabilities are so different from our conventional intuition that they seem to ride the fine border between science fiction and fantasy—yet some quantum technologies can be commercially purchased today, and more are just around the corner.

Quantum technologies can pose profound policy issues, from industrial policy, to openness norms, to everyday privacy. For example, quantum sensing arrays might someday be trained to recognize weapons or sniff the molecules of contraband, even if concealed, or detect guns in private homes by measuring electromagnetic or gravitational fields through roofs. Some quantum algorithms would speed up the process of cracking the encryption that protects our everyday transactions and communications.  Developments in quantum simulation will have tremendous benefits for chemistry and the environment, but these same techniques could be used to engineer more powerful biological, chemical, synthetic, conventional, and even genetic weapons.

Berkeley Professor Chris Hoofnagle, who has a forthcoming book on The Quantum Age with Simson Garfinkel (Cambridge Univ. Press 2021), will describe the state of the science in quantum technologies and consider the consequences of and policy approaches for the quantum age.

Speaker: Chris Hoofnagle

Chris Jay Hoofnagle is Professor of Law in Residence at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law, where he teaches courses on the regulation of technology. He is affiliated faculty with the Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing and an adjunct professor in the School of Information.

Hoofnagle is author of Federal Trade Commission Privacy Law and Policy (Cambridge Univ. Press 2016) and a faculty director of the Berkeley Center for Law & Technology.

An elected member of the American Law Institute, Hoofnagle is of counsel to Gunderson Dettmer LLP, and serves on boards for 4iQ and Palantir Technologies.


Roles for Computing in Social Justice

November 16, 2020

This event is a part of the 2020-2021 Program on Data and Governance’s Data Points Lecture Series, sponsored by Porter Wright Morris & Arthur LLP.

RECORDING of the Zoom Webinar.

Video is supported with closed captioning for accessibility.


About the Event

Recent scholarship in AI ethics warns that computing work has treated problematic features of the status quo as fixed, failing to address and even exacerbate deep patterns of injustice and inequality. Acknowledging these critiques, Rediet Abebe and her co-authors ask: what roles, if any, can computing play to support and advance fundamental social change? In her talk, Professor Abebe will articulate four such roles — computing as a diagnosticformalizerrebuttal, and synecdoche — through an analysis that considers the opportunities as well as the significant risks inherent in such work. She will then discuss how these insights may be used to support advocacy work aimed at fostering more equitable and just systems.

Featured Speaker: Rediet Abebe

RedietAbebeimage

Rediet Abebe

Rediet Abebe is a Junior Fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows and an incoming Assistant Professor of computer science at the University of California, Berkeley. Abebe holds a Ph.D. in computer science from Cornell University and graduate degrees in mathematics from Harvard University and the University of Cambridge. Her research is in artificial intelligence and algorithms, with a focus on equity and justice concerns. Abebe is a co-founder and co-organizer of the multi-institutional, interdisciplinary research initiative Mechanism Design for Social Good (MD4SG). Her dissertation received the 2020 ACM SIGKDD Dissertation Award and an honorable mention for the ACM SIGEcom Dissertation Award for offering the foundations of this emerging research area. Abebe’s work has informed policy and practice at the National Institute of Health (NIH) and the Ethiopian Ministry of Education. She has been honored in the MIT Technology Reviews’ 35 Innovators Under 35 list as a pioneer and the Bloomberg 50 list as a one to watch. Her work has been featured in BBC, ELLE, Forbes, and Shondaland and presented at venues including the National Academy of Sciences, United Nations, and Museum of Modern Art. Abebe also co-founded Black in AI, a non-profit organization tackling representation and equity issues in AI. Her research is influenced by her upbringing in her hometown of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

 


Understanding Racial Bias in Algorithms

September 25, 2020

This event kicks off the 2020-2021 Program on Data and Governance’s Data Points Lecture Series, sponsored by Porter Wright Morris & Arthur LLP.

RECORDING of the Zoom Webinar.

Video is supported with closed captioning for accessibility.


About the Event

In the digital society, algorithms can be a major source of implicit bias and structural racism. Racial, gender, and other types of harmful bias can be baked into the algorithms that companies use to decide who gets jobs, loans, or insurance, and that government uses to determine who gets paroled or who is placed on the no-fly list. Identifying and preventing the racial bias in these algorithms is one of the key civil rights challenges of our era.

In this event, a panel of Ohio State professors and researchers will help us to understand racial bias in algorithms – what it is, how it happens, what harms result, and how we can work to eliminate it.

MODERATOR:
Dennis Hirsch | Professor of Law, Moritz College of Law, and Director, Program on Data and Governance

PANELISTS:
Tanya Berger-Wolf | Faculty Director, Translational Data Analytics Institute; Professor, Computer Science and Engineering; Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology; and Electrical and Computer Engineering
Kelly Capatosto | Senior Data and Policy Specialist, Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity
Sean Hill | Assistant Professor, Moritz College of Law
Christopher Stewart | Associate Professor, Computer Science and Engineering


Your Phone Could Help Fight the Pandemic – But What Would That Mean For Your Privacy?

May 21, 2020

This event concludes the 2019-2020 Program on Data and Governance’s Data Points Lecture Series, sponsored by Porter Wright Morris & Arthur LLP.

RECORDING of the Zoom webinar.
Video is supported with closed captioning for accessibility.


About the Event

Public health authorities are looking to use cell phone data to track both the spread of the COVID-19 virus and people’s social distancing practices. These and other technological responses promise important public health benefits. But they can also seriously endanger our privacy. What is the right balance between public health and privacy, and how can we achieve it?

Join us as a panel of experts discusses how technology is being used to battle COVID-19, the privacy threats that this creates, and how society can best safeguard our privacy – and our health – during the pandemic.

HOST:
Dennis Hirsch | Professor of Law, Moritz College of Law, and Director, Program on Data and Governance

MODERATOR:
Bryan Choi | Assistant Professor, Moritz College of Law and Computer Science & Engineering at The Ohio State University

SPEAKERS:
Stacey Gray | Senior Counsel at the Future of Privacy Forum
Jennifer Lee | Technology & Liberty Program Manager at the ACLU of Washington
Brian Ray | Professor of Law and Director of the Center for Cybersecurity and Privacy Protection at the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law
Michelle Richardson | Director of the Privacy & Data Project at the Center for Democracy & Technology