2020 Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recent Events

Roles for Computing in Social Justice

November 16, 2020

This event is a part of the 2020-2021 Program on Data and Governance’s Data Points Lecture Series, sponsored by Porter Wright Morris & Arthur LLP.

RECORDING of the Zoom Webinar.

Video is supported with closed captioning for accessibility.


About the Event

Recent scholarship in AI ethics warns that computing work has treated problematic features of the status quo as fixed, failing to address and even exacerbate deep patterns of injustice and inequality. Acknowledging these critiques, Rediet Abebe and her co-authors ask: what roles, if any, can computing play to support and advance fundamental social change? In her talk, Professor Abebe will articulate four such roles — computing as a diagnosticformalizerrebuttal, and synecdoche — through an analysis that considers the opportunities as well as the significant risks inherent in such work. She will then discuss how these insights may be used to support advocacy work aimed at fostering more equitable and just systems.

Featured Speaker: Rediet Abebe

RedietAbebeimage

Rediet Abebe

Rediet Abebe is a Junior Fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows and an incoming Assistant Professor of computer science at the University of California, Berkeley. Abebe holds a Ph.D. in computer science from Cornell University and graduate degrees in mathematics from Harvard University and the University of Cambridge. Her research is in artificial intelligence and algorithms, with a focus on equity and justice concerns. Abebe is a co-founder and co-organizer of the multi-institutional, interdisciplinary research initiative Mechanism Design for Social Good (MD4SG). Her dissertation received the 2020 ACM SIGKDD Dissertation Award and an honorable mention for the ACM SIGEcom Dissertation Award for offering the foundations of this emerging research area. Abebe’s work has informed policy and practice at the National Institute of Health (NIH) and the Ethiopian Ministry of Education. She has been honored in the MIT Technology Reviews’ 35 Innovators Under 35 list as a pioneer and the Bloomberg 50 list as a one to watch. Her work has been featured in BBC, ELLE, Forbes, and Shondaland and presented at venues including the National Academy of Sciences, United Nations, and Museum of Modern Art. Abebe also co-founded Black in AI, a non-profit organization tackling representation and equity issues in AI. Her research is influenced by her upbringing in her hometown of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

 


Understanding Racial Bias in Algorithms

September 25, 2020

This event kicks off the 2020-2021 Program on Data and Governance’s Data Points Lecture Series, sponsored by Porter Wright Morris & Arthur LLP.

RECORDING of the Zoom Webinar.

Video is supported with closed captioning for accessibility.


About the Event

In the digital society, algorithms can be a major source of implicit bias and structural racism. Racial, gender, and other types of harmful bias can be baked into the algorithms that companies use to decide who gets jobs, loans, or insurance, and that government uses to determine who gets paroled or who is placed on the no-fly list. Identifying and preventing the racial bias in these algorithms is one of the key civil rights challenges of our era.

In this event, a panel of Ohio State professors and researchers will help us to understand racial bias in algorithms – what it is, how it happens, what harms result, and how we can work to eliminate it.

MODERATOR:
Dennis Hirsch | Professor of Law, Moritz College of Law, and Director, Program on Data and Governance

PANELISTS:
Tanya Berger-Wolf | Faculty Director, Translational Data Analytics Institute; Professor, Computer Science and Engineering; Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology; and Electrical and Computer Engineering
Kelly Capatosto | Senior Data and Policy Specialist, Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity
Sean Hill | Assistant Professor, Moritz College of Law
Christopher Stewart | Associate Professor, Computer Science and Engineering


Your Phone Could Help Fight the Pandemic – But What Would That Mean For Your Privacy?

May 21, 2020

This event concludes the 2019-2020 Program on Data and Governance’s Data Points Lecture Series, sponsored by Porter Wright Morris & Arthur LLP.

RECORDING of the Zoom webinar.
Video is supported with closed captioning for accessibility.


About the Event

Public health authorities are looking to use cell phone data to track both the spread of the COVID-19 virus and people’s social distancing practices. These and other technological responses promise important public health benefits. But they can also seriously endanger our privacy. What is the right balance between public health and privacy, and how can we achieve it?

Join us as a panel of experts discusses how technology is being used to battle COVID-19, the privacy threats that this creates, and how society can best safeguard our privacy – and our health – during the pandemic.

HOST:
Dennis Hirsch | Professor of Law, Moritz College of Law, and Director, Program on Data and Governance

MODERATOR:
Bryan Choi | Assistant Professor, Moritz College of Law and Computer Science & Engineering at The Ohio State University

SPEAKERS:
Stacey Gray | Senior Counsel at the Future of Privacy Forum
Jennifer Lee | Technology & Liberty Program Manager at the ACLU of Washington
Brian Ray | Professor of Law and Director of the Center for Cybersecurity and Privacy Protection at the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law
Michelle Richardson | Director of the Privacy & Data Project at the Center for Democracy & Technology


Elections in the Era of Technological Threats and Opportunities

January 17, 2020

This symposium is co-organized by The Ohio State Technology Law Journal (OSTLJ) , the Program on Data and Governance, Election Law @ Moritz, and the Center for Interdisciplinary Law and Policy Studies.

In 2016, American technology was used to sabotage American elections in ways that shocked the nation and the world. At the same time, that same technology has been celebrated for facilitating unprecedented political organization and participation. As lawmakers, election officials, and lawyers work to protect elections across the globe, they will need a detailed understanding of the technologies at stake. What are the technological threats and opportunities for election governance in the interconnected digital environment of the 21st century? How should those threats and opportunities be affected by law, regulation, and policy?

On January 17, 2020, the Ohio State Technology Law Journal will host its annual symposium to tackle this new reality. Three panels of experts in law, computer science, political science, and journalism will address a range of topics including: proposals to improve and monitor ballot technology; state and federal reforms to secure the accuracy of the voting process; content moderation of political speech on social media sites; regulation of campaign finance, including foreign sources; and online intimidation of voters.

Learn More

 


Exam Break: US Senate Commerce Hearing Watch Party

December 4, 2019

The Moritz community is invited to this exam break in Saxbe, where PDG faculty, staff, and students will be watching and discussing the live stream of the US Senate Commerce Committee’s hearing on comprehensive federal data privacy legislation.