Briefing Room

Peter Shane

Peter Shane

The Historic Role of an Attorney General and the Issue of Executive Power

As the Senate Judiciary Committee begins the confirmation hearing for William Barr, Professor Peter Shane discusses the role of an attorney general and their relationship to executive power.

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Peter Shane

Trump Says He Alone Can Do It. His Attorney General Nominee Usually Agrees.

“The interpretive approach of Justice Department lawyers to the Constitution is very important because many separation-of-powers issues never wind up in court,” Shane said. “Barr’s method is not uniquely his, but it does represent a particularly aggressive school of executive power thought.”

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Peter Shane

Even if Trump Tries to Fire Mueller, He Can’t Fire the Grand Jury

“Uncertainty as to the future of the Russia investigation will surely not abate amid the president’s Twitter storms,” Shane writes.

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Peter Shane

Professor Peter Shane testifies at Kavanaugh confirmation hearing

When Professor Peter Shane, Jacob E. Davis and Jacob E. Davis II Chair in Law, was called upon by Democrats to testify at Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation hearing to the U.S. Supreme Court, the hearings were set to begin in just 12 days. Shane had even less time to prepare his testimony: His remarks were due two days in advance, and of course, he still had to teach.

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Executive Orders on Immigration

On Monday, Feb. 6  a faculty panel discussed the President’s Executive Orders on Immigration. Dean Alan C. Michaels moderated and Professors David S. Bloomfield, Ruth Colker, Mohamed Helal, and Peter Shane presented. [Listen to Audio Recording]

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Reflections on the President’s Executive Orders on Immigration

On Monday, Feb. 6, at 4 p.m. in Saxbe Auditorium, a faculty panel discussed the President’s Executive Orders on Immigration. Dean Alan C. Michaels  moderated and Professors David S. Bloomfield, Ruth Colker, Mohamed Helal, and Peter Shane spoke. To listen […]

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Shane pens essay on U.S. v. Texas decision for The Atlantic

Professor Peter M. Shane, the Jacob E. Davis and Jacob E. Davis II Chair in Law, wrote an op-ed for The Atlantic on U.S. v. Texas, a challenge to the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) program that went before the Supreme Court.

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Shane writes op-ed for American Constitution Society blog

Peter M. Shane wrote an opinion piece for the American Constitution Society’s blog on U.S. District Court Judge Andrew Hanen and the legality of deferred action.

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Shane writes op-ed for Bloomberg BNA

Peter M. Shane, the Jacob E. Davis and Jacob E. Davis II Chair in Law and an internationally recognized scholar in administrative law, wrote an article for Bloomberg BNA about congressional attacks on FCC-White House links and net neutrality.

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Shane writes for Slate

Professor Peter M. Shane, one of the country’s foremost experts in presidential powers, wrote a commentary on the Bergdahl-Guantanamo prisoner swap. Ironically, a Bush-era memo would give the President legal cover, but Shane argues he doesn’t need it.

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Shane writes about recess appointments in The Atlantic

Professor Peter M. Shane, a nationally recognized expert in separation of powers law, wrote a column in The Atlantic on the Supreme Court case Noel Canning v. NLRB. Shane wrote: “There is nothing liberty-protecting in the capacity of the Senate to undermine public administration by stonewalling the nominations of perfectly qualified government officers.”

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NSA surveillance program focus of ‘draft symposium’

A journal led by faculty and students at Moritz has launched an online “working draft symposium” on the surveillance programs of the National Security Agency. “NSA Surveillance: Issues of Security, Privacy, and Civil Liberty” is only the second symposium in the wake of recent revelations on NSA’s bulk collection of data about Americans’ telephone and Internet communications.

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