Briefing Room

Media News

Peter Shane

How the House Judiciary Committee Should Do Its Job in the Days Ahead

“The implications for Trump are twofold: First, should Congress find that presidential corruption has so undermined the legitimacy of the incumbent as to warrant impeachment, the non-criminality of his corruption would not be a constitutional defense,” Shane writes. “Second, should Congress deem the president guilty of criminal obstruction of justice, it would likewise be irrelevant that the Department of Justice had decided not to bring charges.”

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Ruth Colker

The Time Crunch on Standardized Tests Is Unnecessary

“Whether you can tell me the answer quickly has nothing to do with whether you, in fact, know the content,” Colker said. “And there are some people who, for whatever reason, are pretty quick at things. They don’t necessarily have more depth of knowledge, and depth of knowledge [is] what we should care about for admissions purposes.”

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Ric Simmons

Without full Mueller report, Trump obstruction questions leave legal experts wondering

“The Department of Justice must decide whether or not to prosecute a person for a federal crime, and for a case and potential defendant who is this high-profile, the decision had to be made at the highest level,” Simmons said.

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Daniel Tokaji

The Fight Over Partisan Gerrymandering Is Moving Beyond The Supreme Court

“In general, ideologically conservative judges aren’t sympathetic to the idea that courts should get involved—they think it’s a political question,” Tokaji said.

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Ruth Colker

The College Admissions Scandal and the Trouble With Strictly Timed Standardized Tests

“Stringently timed, high-stake tests have an adverse impact against racial minorities, women, those with low socio-economic status, non-native speakers of English, older applicants, and people with disabilities,” Colker writes. “Of course, that adverse impact is further exacerbated when the ultra-wealthy cheat to inflate their children’s scores.”

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Efthimios Parasidis

The Oregon tetanus case caused many to want justice. But do vaccines reach child neglect bar?

“We are all individuals living in a community and we have the freedom to choose badly,” Parasidis said. “Is it the state’s role to say you have made a bad choice?”

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Peter Shane

Why Americans should hope the Mueller report is not definitive

“The asterisk is that these investigations have very different purposes and very different constitutional roots,” Shane said.

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Douglas Berman

For Weed Arrests in Baltimore, It’s Catch-and-Release Season

“For the prosecutors that work for Mosby, this may be a way to empower them, or at least free them up to work on other matters that they think are much more important,” Berman said. “It may be exactly the flip for the police force. The rank-and-file police may think it’s important to be able to do further investigation based on some suspicion of marijuana activity.”

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Daniel Tokaji

Columbus’ rarely used ethnic-intimidation charge to face constitutional challenge

“After reading the ethnic intimidation statute in conjunction with the disorderly conduct section … I’m troubled,” Tokaji said.

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Micah Berman

Clearing the air about e-cigarettes, vaping, nicotine and health

“It seems to be that nicotine exposure in kids is linked to development in mood disorders, attention disorders, other drug-seeking behaviors,” Berman said.

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Micah Berman

Flavored vapes draw FDA ire, with some exceptions

“There’s a lot more that the FDA could do, and I think the exception for menthol is problematic,” Berman said. 

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Douglas Berman

Manafort will probably serve only 6.5 years

Owing to changes in the First Step Act, it is possible that Paul Manafort’s 7½ -year sentence could be reduced by 378 days, he said. 

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