Briefing Room

Media News

Edward Foley

Trump is open to accepting dirt on his opponents from foreign governments. Is that against the law?

Professor Edward Foley was recently quoted in an article by CBS News titled, “Trump is open to accepting dirt on his opponents from foreign governments. Is that against the law?”

“That’s a question you know ultimately I don’t think that can really be addressed by law. It’s a question of the personal ethics of the candidate,” Foley said. “What kind of a candidate wants to accept help from a foreign government that is trying to influence the outcome of a U.S. election?”

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A judge rules against one stem-cell clinic. There are hundreds of them

Assistant Professor Patricia Zettler was recently quoted in an article by The New York Times titled,  “A Judge Rules Against One Stem-Cell Clinic. There Are Hundreds of Them.”

Zettler called the court ruling “a preliminary but important victory for the F.D.A. and the public health.”

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Peter Shane

Liberals begin lining up young judges for a post-Trump surge

Professor Peter Shane was recently quoted in an article in The New York Times titled, “Liberals Begin Lining Up Young Judges for a Post-Trump Surge.”

“It would be nice to see more people who have experience outside the three big pots (sitting judges, prosecutors and senior law partners),” he said 

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Daniel Tokaji

Redistricting guru’s hard drives could mean legal, political woes for GOP

Professor Daniel Tokaji was recently interviewed by NPR in an article titled, “Redistricting Guru’s Hard Drives Could Mean Legal, Political Woes For GOP.” 

“It was not really, as they claimed, to get better enforcement of the Voting Rights Act so that Latinos could be fairly represented,” said Tokaji. “In fact, there was a deliberate plan, and that plan includes the dilution of Latino votes and the enhancement of Republican voting strength.”

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Dennis Hirsch

Is Apple really a privacy-first company?

Professor Dennis Hirsch was quoted in an article by Salon titled, “Is Apple really a privacy-first company?” 

“I think this is a welcome development where companies are starting to appreciate they can compete with each other with privacy.”

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Attorney General Dave Yost, six predecessors push to end Ohio’s statute of limitations on rape

Professor Emeritus and former dean Nancy Hardin Rogers was quoted in a recent Columbus Dispatch article titled, “Attorney General Dave Yost, six predecessors push to end Ohio’s statute of limitations on rape.”

“They are beginning to understand the suffering that continues as the victim,” she said. “And with that public understanding of these things, I think it will be feasible — and in other states we have seen that it was feasible — to change the statute of limitations for rape.”

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Joshua Dressler

Can the president be prosecuted? Vox asked 16 legal experts

Professor emeritus Joshua Dressler was recently quoted in a Vox article that featured multiple legal experts discussing whether or not President Trump can be prosecuted. 

“The answer to the question is and will remain unknown unless and until the DOJ interpretation of the Constitution (namely, that a sitting president cannot be indicted) is tested in the courts.”

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Ric Simmons

Mueller says charging Trump would’ve been unconstitutional. These scholars beg to differ

Professor Ric Simmons was recently quoted in a Vice News article titled, “Mueller says charging Trump would’ve been unconstitutional. These scholars beg to differ.”

“There’s nothing in the Constitution that says directly that a president can’t be indicted. I think Mueller’s hands were tied. But there’s another question: Is the memo correct? I think it’s not.”

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Christopher Walker

Census plaintiffs alert Supreme Court to 11th hour new evidence

Professor Christopher Walker was quoted in a recent article on Law.com titled, “Census plaintiffs alert Supreme Court to 11th hour new evidence.” 

“At the end of the day, they’re reviewing an administrative record and don’t usually look outside the record. A lot of the argument seems to be hinging around what’s not in the record and this may be additional fuel for this.”

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foley

What if the 2020 election is disputed?

Professor Edward Foley co-authored an article in The Hill titled, “What if 2020 election is disputed?”

“Congress, being ever more partisan, stands institutionally incapable of resolving an election contest in a way that supporters of the losing party will view as legitimate.”

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Peter Shane

Government A-OK: Ohio’s system of checks and balances avoids many federal pitfalls

“The public has much less tolerance for political grandstanding and much greater insistence on problem solving at the state level,” Shane said. 

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Daniel Tokaji

National abortion controversy centers on Ohio

“For abortion opponents, the calculation that the costs of the strategy they’re pursuing right now are pretty low,” Tokaji said. “They may well be right about that.”

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