Sidebar        Kristi Wilcox Arth ’11

Kristi Wilcox Arth ’11 is an associate at the Bradley law firm in Nashville, Tennessee, where she represents clients in business, government, education, and entertainment. “Our firm handles a lot of really high-level matters and high-stakes litigation and deals. Those things are always very important to clients, and to know they trust us with something that is make-or-break for their business is nice,” she said. “I really enjoy developing client relationships where they know they can call me, and I’m available to listen, respond and help them through litigation, which can be taxing not only mentally, but also emotionally for clients. I really enjoy that aspect of the work.”

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With legal expertise and arts policy savvy, Kristi Wilcox Arth ’11 harmonizes her skills to pursue a career in Nashville’s ever-growing business and creative sectors.

As an associate at Bradley, Arth practices in litigation, intellectual property, trademark, and copyright law after earning both her M.A. and J.D. at The Ohio State University.

The Alabama native found herself looking at attending Ohio State for its top-notch Arts Policy and Administration master’s program, but without a dedicated career path in the arts policy field, the flexibility to devise her own unique education plan at Ohio State made all the difference.

 “Ohio State really let me craft my educational package so I ended up being one of the first people, if not the first, to do the joint J.D. and M.A. in Arts Policy,” Arth said.

Arth represents clients in business, government, education, and entertainment handling large-scale litigation, from disputes between shareholders of record labels to negligence cases for school boards and everything in between. Working with clients of all stripes has been a rewarding experience for Arth.

“Our firm handles a lot of really high-level matters and high-stakes litigation and deals. Those things are always very important to clients, and to know they trust us with something that is make-or-break for their business is nice,” Arth said. “I really enjoy developing client relationships where they know they can call me, and I’m available to listen, respond and help them through litigation, which can be taxing not only mentally, but also emotionally for clients. I really enjoy that aspect of the work.”

Art is more than a career interest for Arth, but also a way for her to give back to the community. Arth serves on the board of directors for Southern Word, a spoken word nonprofit organization in Nashville. Southern Word “serves underprivileged youth by helping them develop literacy, public speaking, and identity skills through the art form of poetry,” Arth said.

Studying in Columbus was the perfect backdrop to complement Arth’s academic pursuits, allowing her to explore her freedom and passions.

“Columbus has such a young vibe with Ohio State at the heart of it, and it has a lot of really cool restaurants and a very vibrant arts scene, which I was able to participate in through my master’s program in arts policy,” she said.

Professors Deborah Jones Merritt and Edward Lee both impacted Arth’s career at Moritz and beyond. Professor Merritt taught Arth the valuable lessons of deliberate practice and playing into her own strengths in order to be successful, and Professor Lee has continued to serve as a mentor to Arth.

“Moritz gave me a professional skill set that allowed me to come into my own,” said Arth, who cites her trial advocacy class as the one course that prepared her most for her current position as an associate attorney at a large, full-service law firm.

Arth advises that current law students stay true to themselves when deciding on a career path. “Be prepared to work hard, and be really honest with yourself about your own strengths and weaknesses,” she said. “At first, I wasn’t sure how I would do as a litigator because I’m not your bulldog, bang on the table kind of person, but when I was able to acknowledge my own strengths and skill sets, I was able to be an effective litigator by not trying to be somebody I’m not.”