Oxford Study Abroad

 

Past Academic Programs

Academic Program Archive

Courses and professors change from year-to-year. The following is an archive of the courses that have been offered, along with the professors who taught them. An asterisk (*) denotes the program director for each year.

2014 Academic Program

British Public Law (3 credits) taught by Georgia professor Lori A. Ringhand

Comparative Constitutional Law (3 credits) taught by Georgia professor Lori A. Ringhand

European Union Law (3 credits) taught by Oxford professor Cathryn Costello

Congress and Parliament in Comparative Perspective (1 credit) taught by Georgia Senator and US ambassador Wyche Fowler

Supervised Research Tutorial (3 credits)

This course is modeled on the format of the justly renowned Oxford tutorial. Each tutor will meet periodically with a small number of students. Meetings will be devoted to planning or revising the students’ individual research papers, to be completed by the end of the semester. Law students will participate in groups of 3 or 4 with their individual tutors (professors). Listed below are the six Oxford professors who are currently supervising research tutorials and their general subject areas.

2013 Academic Program

Comparative Constitutionalism: Selected Issues (3 credits)
taught by Georgia professor Joseph S. Miller

Comparative Intellectual Property Law (3 credits)
taught by Georgia professor Joseph S. Miller

European Union Law (3 credits)
taught by Oxford professor Cathryn Costello

Supervised Research Tutorial (3 credits)

This course is modeled on the format of the justly renowned Oxford tutorial. Each tutor will meet periodically with a small number of students. Meetings will be devoted to planning or revising the students’ individual research papers, to be completed by the end of the semester. Law students will participate in groups of 3 or 4 with their individual tutors (professors). Listed below are the six Oxford professors who are currently supervising research tutorials and their general subject areas.

2012 Academic Program

International Business Transactions (3 credits)
taught by Moritz professor Daniel C.K. Chow

This course focuses on the private international business transaction. We will cover the sale of goods, agency and distributorships, contract manufacturing, and foreign direct investment. Each is a step in a progression from the least involved (international sales) to the most involved (foreign direct investment) form of international business. Along the way, we will also examine issues such as the Convention on Contracts for the international Sale of Goods, letters of credit (financing), licensing of intellectual property rights, EU competition law, the issue of bribery in international business under the Foreign Corruption Practices Act, and the rise of global piracy of IP rights. Our focus will be on IBTs in three settings: the United States, the European Union, and China. We also examine in a peripheral way issues related to export controls and imports. Our focus, however, is on the private law issues in the planning and implementation of international business transactions. Our casebook is Daniel Chow & Thomas Schoenbaum, International Business Transactions (Aspen 2d 2010) and Documents Supplement.

International Trade Law (3 credits)
taught by Moritz professor Daniel C.K. Chow

This course focuses on the major institutions and laws of the multi-lateral trading system. While IBT focuses on the private law issues in international business, International Trade focuses squarely on the public law issues. The focus of this course is the World Trade Organization, its major disciplines and their implementation into U.S. domestic law. We will cover the following WTO agreements in depth: the General Agreements on Tariffs and Trade (concerning goods, mainly tariffs), the General Agreement on Trade in Services (covering services), and the Agreement on Trade Related Intellectual Property Rights or TRIPS (covering technology). Each of these disciplines sets forth the standards in each channel of trade that have now been implemented into domestic law by all members of the WTO. We also examine the Dispute Settlement Understanding. In addition, we cover some larger trade and society issues, such as trade and the environment, trade and intellectual property, trade and human rights, and the conflict over trade and development issues between developed and developing countries. In addition to our focus on the United States, we also examine trade law issues in the European Union and China. Our casebook is Daniel Chow & Thomas Schoenbaum, International Trade Law (Aspen 2008) and Documents Supplement.

European Union Law (3 credits)
taught by Oxford professor Cathryn Costello

Designed to enable student to understand EU legal system and institutions as they evolve. Experts from Brussels teach discrete parts of the course. Topics include: introduction to the history and nature of the European Union (EU); law-making and administrative institutions and processes in the EU; economic sectoral policies, including competition and state aids, transport and agriculture; the internal market, including the freedoms (movement of goods, workers, capital services); harmonization of national laws process, including company law, intellectual property, tax; external economic trade policy (common commercial policy); the impact of the Single European Act and the Treaty on European Union, including the expanded economic, commercial, social and political scope of the EU; the role of the European Economic Area.

Supervised Research Tutorial (3 credits)
taught by Oxford professor Cathryn Costello

This course is modeled on the format of the justly renowned Oxford tutorial. Each tutor will meet periodically with a small number of students. Meetings will be devoted to planning or revising the students’ individual research papers, to be completed by the end of the semester. Law students will participate in groups of 3 or 4 with their individual tutors (professors). Listed below are the six Oxford professors who are currently supervising research tutorials and their general subject areas. (View Past Tutorial Topics)

  • Professor Nicholas Bamforth: Comparative Constitutional and Human Rights Law
  • Professor Anne Davies: Comparative Labor and Employment Law and Administrative Law
  • Professor Elizabeth Fisher: Comparative Risk Regulation, Environmental Law and Regulatory Subjects
  • Professor Keith Hawkins: Comparative Criminology and Criminal Justice
  • Professor James Edelman: Contract Law, Torts, Equity, and Remedies
  • Professor Stefan Vogenauer: Comparative Private Law

2011 Academic Program

Comparative Constitutional Rights (3 credits)
taught by Georgia professor Lori A. Ringhand

All rights-protective democratic systems of government have to deal with the problem of balancing the civil rights and liberties of individuals against the power of legislative majorities to govern. This course examines how different legal systems grapple with this dilemma. It does so by considering how different constitutional texts, governmental structures and social and legal traditions shape juridical responses to common questions about rights. The course will begin with a basic introduction to the legal systems of various countries. We will then read English-language translations of cases from different legal systems that address similar issues. The readings will include hate speech cases from Germany, Israel and the United States; religious freedom cases from Turkey, France and the United Kingdom; abortion cases from Germany, France and the United States; and political speech cases from Israel and Turkey. The course will be evaluated through an open-book, in-class final examination.

British Government and the British Constitutional Tradition (3 credits)
taught by Georgia professor Lori A. Ringhand

This course is an introduction to basic concepts of British public law. The course will examine the structure of British government and British constitutionalism; the respective roles of the Crown, courts and Parliament in British governance; the unique nature and function of the United Kingdom in relation to its member countries (England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland) and the regulation within British law of political parties, political participation and interest groups. The influence of European Law within the British legal system also may be addressed. The course will be evaluated through an open-book, in-class final examination.

Legal Processes (3 credits)
taught by Oxford Professor Keith Hawkins

The purpose of this course is to give students an understanding of the law in action. Accordingly, the course will not so much teach students law as teach students about law, exploring various aspects of how legal rules operate. The substantive focus will be mostly on criminal justice and public law, although civil law will not be neglected since there are important parallels to be drawn, for example, in the handling of civil disputes and pre-trial bargaining in criminal cases. Study materials will be drawn from both U.S. and U.K. sources. The areas and questions to be covered will include: how social problems are transformed and created into potentially legal cases; how law is enforced; how cases are handled by legal bureaucracies and lawyers; how cases are disposed of, including pre-trial bargaining and settling out of court; the role of courts and adjudication; and alternative forms of handling disputes.

Supervised Research Tutorial (3 credits)

This course is modeled on the format of the justly renowned Oxford tutorial. Each tutor will meet periodically with a small number of students. Meetings will be devoted to planning or revising the students’ individual research papers, to be completed by the end of the semester. Law students will participate in groups of 3 or 4 with their individual tutors (professors). Listed below are the six Oxford professors who are currently supervising research tutorials, their general subject areas, and some of the research and writing projects prepared under their guidance in 2006 through 2009.

2010 Academic Program

Comparative Employment Discrimination Law (3 credits)
taught by Ohio State professor L. Camille H�bert*

This course explores selected topics of employment discrimination from a comparative perspective, examining the approaches taken by the United States, Canada, England and other countries. Topics to be covered will include: gender discrimination, including pregnancy discrimination and sexual harassment; sexual orientation discrimination; race discrimination; and disability discrimination.

Comparative Dispute Resolution (3 credits)
taught by Ohio State professor L. Camille H�bert*

This course will explore the methods by which disputes, particularly employment disputes, are resolved in the United States and in other countries, including England and other European countries. The course will focus on the advantages and disadvantages of litigation, forms of alternative dispute resolution, and administrative tribunals used extensively in other countries.

Legal Processes (3 credits)
taught by Oxford Professor Keith Hawkins

The purpose of this course is to give students an understanding of the law in action. Accordingly, the course will not so much teach students law as teach students about law, exploring various aspects of how legal rules operate. The substantive focus will be mostly on criminal justice and public law, although civil law will not be neglected since there are important parallels to be drawn, for example, in the handling of civil disputes and pre-trial bargaining in criminal cases. Study materials will be drawn from both U.S. and U.K. sources. The areas and questions to be covered will include: how social problems are transformed and created into potentially legal cases; how law is enforced; how cases are handled by legal bureaucracies and lawyers; how cases are disposed of, including pre-trial bargaining and settling out of court; the role of courts and adjudication; and alternative forms of handling disputes.

Supervised Research Tutorial (3 credits)

This course is modeled on the format of the justly renowned Oxford tutorial. Each tutor will meet periodically with a small number of students. Meetings will be devoted to planning or revising the students’ individual research papers, to be completed by the end of the semester. Law students will participate in groups of 3 or 4 with their individual tutors (professors). Listed below are the six Oxford professors who are currently supervising research tutorials, their general subject areas, and some of the research and writing projects prepared under their guidance in 2006 through 2009.

2009 Academic Program

International Intellectual Property (3 credits)
taught by Georgia professor Paul Heald*

This course will explore the principles and policies supporting the international protection of intellectual property rights, as well as the sources of these rights. We will focus on the international treaty arrangements for copyright, patent, and trademark protection, as well as on questions of enforcement, jurisdiction, and choice of law. The course will also examine the function of international intellectual property organizations, recent developments in the European Union, and issues relating to establishing and enforcing intellectual property rights in less developed nations. No background in science, engineering, or international law is required for this course.

International Trade Laws (3 credits)
taught by Georgia professor Paul Heald*

Study of international institutions (WTO, EU, WIPO, ICC, etc.), treaties (GATT, NAFTA, Warsaw Convention, COGSA, etc.), and statutes (CISG, Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, various implementation acts, etc.) relevant to the movement of goods, services, capital, and technology around the world.

Legal Processes (3 credits)
taught by Oxford Professor Keith Hawkins

The purpose of this course is to give students an understanding of the law in action. Accordingly, the course will not so much teach students law as teach students about law, exploring various aspects of how legal rules operate. The substantive focus will be mostly on criminal justice and public law, although civil law will not be neglected since there are important parallels to be drawn, for example, in the handling of civil disputes and pre-trial bargaining in criminal cases. Study materials will be drawn from both U.S. and U.K. sources. The areas and questions to be covered will include: how social problems are transformed and created into potentially legal cases; how law is enforced; how cases are handled by legal bureaucracies and lawyers; how cases are disposed of, including pre-trial bargaining and settling out of court; the role of courts and adjudication; and alternative forms of handling disputes.

In addition to the two 75-minute class meetings per week, there will be a visit to the Oxford Crown Court or to the Magistrates’ Courts in the city (possibly to both). The Magistrates’ Courts are important because all criminal cases (as well as some others) that arise in the Oxford area are brought in that judicial forum.

Supervised Research Tutorial (3 credits)

This course is modeled on the format of the justly renowned Oxford tutorial. Each tutor will meet periodically with a small number of students. Meetings will be devoted to planning or revising the students’ individual research papers, to be completed by the end of the semester. Law students will participate in groups of 3 or 4 with their individual tutors (professors). Listed below are the six Oxford professors who are currently supervising research tutorials, their general subject areas, and some of the research and writing projects prepared under their guidance in 2006 and 2007.

2008 Academic Program

International Arbitration (3 credits)
taught by Moritz professor Ellen Deason *

This course will explore arbitration as a means to resolve international and transnational disputes. We will focus primarily on commercial arbitration, but will also consider state-to-state arbitration. The course will examine arbitral procedures and the governing law, which is developing through the interaction of private contractual ordering, national law, and international treaties. Specific topics will include considerations in designing a contractual arbitration clause, arbitrability, arbitrators’ obligations and powers, enforcement of arbitral awards, and the influence of national litigation systems on the conduct of arbitration. The course will also include the function of international arbitral institutions such as the London Court of International Arbitration. No background in alternative dispute resolution is required for this course.

Comparative Law of Privacy (3 credits)
taught by Moritz professor Ellen Deason *

Privacy is a topic that cuts across many different areas of law and policy. The course will examine concepts of privacy and the legal frameworks for protecting it in a variety of contexts, including government surveillance, genetic information, employment, and consumer data. It will explore the balance between privacy and other rights and interests, such as freedom of expression and security. The course will provide an opportunity to compare the approaches of several different legal systems, and also to observe the relationship between the development of law and the rapidly changing world of information technology. Along with the law of selected nations, we will also consider the influence of transnational agreements such as the European Convention on Human Rights.

Legal Processes (3 credits)
taught by Oxford Professor Keith Hawkins

The purpose of this course is to give students an understanding of the law in action. Accordingly, the course will not so much teach students law as teach students about law, exploring various aspects of how legal rules operate. The substantive focus will be mostly on criminal justice and public law, although civil law will not be neglected since there are important parallels to be drawn, for example, in the handling of civil disputes and pre-trial bargaining in criminal cases. Study materials will be drawn from both U.S. and U.K. sources. The areas and questions to be covered will include: how social problems are transformed and created into potentially legal cases; how law is enforced; how cases are handled by legal bureaucracies and lawyers; how cases are disposed of, including pre-trial bargaining and settling out of court; the role of courts and adjudication; and alternative forms of handling disputes.

There will be two 75-minute class meetings per week. In addition, there will be a visit to the Oxford Crown Court or to the Magistrates’ Courts in the city (possibly to both). The Magistrates’ Courts are important because all criminal cases (as well as some others) that arise in the Oxford area are brought in that judicial forum.

Supervised Research Tutorial (3 credits)

This course is modeled on the format of the justly renowned Oxford tutorial. Each tutor will meet periodically with small numbers of students. Meetings will be devoted to planning or revising the students’ individual research papers, to be completed by the end of the semester. Law students will participate in groups of 3 or 4 with their individual tutors (professors). Options for subject areas and professors for the research tutorial are as follows:

2007

International Intellectual Property (3 credits)
taught by UGA Professor David Shipley
*

This course will explore the principles and policies supporting the international protection of intellectual property rights as well as the sources of those rights. We will focus on the international treaty arrangements for copyright, patent and trademark protection as well as on questions of enforcement, jurisdiction and choice of law. The course will also examine the function of international intellectual property organizations, recent developments in the European Union, and issues relating to establishing and enforcing intellectual property rights in less developed nations. No background in science, engineering,international law or intellectual property is required for this course.

Comparative Administrative Law (3 credits)
taught by UGA Professor David Shipley
*

This course will focus on the law controlling administrative agencies and their actions in the United States and the European Union. Along with constitutional and statutory restraints we will consider judicially formulated policies for the administrative process, and how the established national administrative practices in European countries like Germany, Italy, France and England have come to coexist with EU requirements. Control over administrative discretion and enforced accountability are themes along with the development of administrative law in national ( U.S. ) and supernational (EU) settings.

Legal Processes (3 credits)
taught by Oxford Professor Keith Hawkins

The purpose of this course is to give students an understanding of the law in action. Accordingly, the course will not so much teach students law as teach students about law, exploring various aspects of how legal rules operate. The substantive focus will be mostly on criminal justice and public law, although civil law will not be neglected since there are important parallels to be drawn, for example, in the handling of civil disputes and pre-trial bargaining in criminal cases. Study materials will be drawn from both U.S. and U.K. sources. The areas and questions to be covered will include: how social problems are transformed and created into potentially legal cases; how law is enforced; how cases are handled by legal bureaucracies and lawyers; how cases are disposed of, including pre-trial bargaining and settling out of court; the role of courts and adjudication; and alternative forms of handling disputes.

There will be two 75-minute class meetings per week. In addition, there will be a visit to the Oxford Crown Court or to the Magistrates’ Courts in the city (possibly to both). The Magistrates’ Courts are important because all criminal cases (as well as some others) that arise in the Oxford area are brought in that judicial forum.

Supervised Research Tutorial (3 credits)

This course is modeled on the format of the justly renowned Oxford tutorial. Each tutor will meet periodically with small numbers of students. Meetings will be devoted to planning or revising the students’ individual research papers, to be completed by the end of the semester. Law students will participate in groups of 3 or 4 with their individual tutors (professors). Options for subject areas and professors for the research tutorial are as follows:

2006

Comparative Labor and Employment Law (3 credits)
taught by Moritz Professor James J. Brudney
*

This course examined American and British workplace law from a comparative perspective, including the impact of EU law on the development of statutes and court decisions in the U.K. Doctrinal readings focused primarily on issues of status discrimination (especially, though not limited to, various aspects of gender discrimination), labor-management relations (including union organizing, collective bargaining, strikes, and economic self-help), and job termination (unfair individual dismissals and group termination events such as plant closings and mass layoffs).

Comparative Legislation (3 credits)
taught by Moritz Professor James J. Brudney
*

This course introduced students to certain problems of statutory interpretation and the separation of powers, principally as they are framed by legislatures, courts, and scholars from the U.S. and the U.K., but with additional focus on the same problems as they arise under the new government of South Africa. A sample of topics covered include the tensions between formally enacted text and purpose-related legislative context in understanding statutory meaning, the importance of maxims such as canons of construction (both linguistic and substantive) in the interpretive process, the role of courts in correcting legislative mistakes or filling statutory gaps, and differences between interpretation in a parliamentary versus a constitutional regime.

Legal Processes (3 credits)
taught by Oxford Professor Keith Hawkins

The purpose of this course was to give students an understanding of the law in action. Accordingly, the course did not so much teach students law as teach students about law, exploring various aspects of how legal rules operate. The substantive focus was mostly on criminal justice and public law, although civil law was not neglected since there were important parallels to be drawn, for example, in the handling of civil disputes and pre-trial bargaining in criminal cases. Study materials were drawn from both U.S. and U.K. sources. The areas and questions covered include: how social problems are transformed and created into potentially legal cases; how law is enforced; how cases are handled by legal bureaucracies and lawyers; how cases are disposed of, including pre-trial bargaining and settling out of court; the role of courts and adjudication; and alternative forms of handling disputes.

Supervised Research Tutorial (3 credits)

This course was modeled on the format of the justly renowned Oxford tutorial. Each tutor met periodically with small numbers of students. Meetings were devoted to planning or revising the students’ individual research papers, which were completed by the end of the semester. Law students participated in groups of 3 or 4 with their individual tutors (professors). Options for subject areas and professors for the research tutorial were as follows: