Debates Over Patentable Subject Matter, with Lisa Larrimore Ouellette

September 18, 2014 | 12:10 pm - 1:30 pm

Lisa Larrimore OuelletteLisa Larrimore Ouellette will address the debate over patentable subject matter by focusing on non-patent incentives for genetic research and software—looking both descriptively at what kinds of incentives the government is currently providing and normatively at whether these make sense from a holistic policy perspective.

Lisa Larrimore Ouellette is Assistant Professor at Stanford Law School.   Ouellette’s scholarship and research centers on intellectual property law, with a particular focus on the economic effect of both U.S. and international patent laws on innovation.

Prior to her faculty appointment at Stanford Law School, Ouellette was a Postdoctoral Associate in Law and Thomson Reuters Fellow at the Information Society Project at Yale Law School (2012-present) and clerked for the Honorable John M. Walker Jr. on the U.S. Court of Appeals (2013-present). She also clerked for the Honorable Timothy B. Dyk of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (2011-2012). She holds a JD (2011) from Yale Law School, where she was an Articles Editor of The Yale Law Journal, a Coker Fellow in Contract Law, and Director of the Yale Chapter of Universities Allied for Essential Medicines. She earned a Ph.D. (2008) in physics from Cornell as well as a B.A. (2002) in physics from Swarthmore College.

Ouellette’s publications include “Patent Experimentalism,” Virginia Law Review (2014); “Beyond the Patents-Prizes Debate,” Texas Law Review (2013, highlighting the overlooked benefits of R&D tax incentives); “The Google Shortcut to Trademark Law,” California Law Review (2013), an argument for the probative value of online search results in trademark disputes; “Do Patents Disclose Useful Information,” Harvard Journal of Law and Technology (2012), an empirical study of whether patents disclose useful information to scientists; and “What Are the Sources of Patent Inflation? An Analysis of Federal Circuit Patentability Rulings,” Yale Law Journal Online (2011).

Lisa earned a B.A. in physics from Swarthmore College and a Ph.D. in physics from Cornell, and she has conducted scientific research at the Max Planck Institute, CERN, and NIST. She received her J.D. from Yale Law School, where she was an Articles Editor of the Yale Law Journal, a Coker Fellow in Contract Law, and Director of the Yale Chapter of Universities Allied for Essential Medicines.