Faculty in the News

John B. Quigley Media Hits

The following is a list of selected media coverage for John B. Quigley. The links below will direct you to sites that are not affiliated with the Moritz College of Law. They are subject to change, and some may expire or require registration as time passes.

 

Ukraine’s ceasefire

June 25, 2014

Professor John Quigley appeared on RT’s Cross Talk with Peter Lavelle to discuss the ceasefire declared between the Ukrainian government and separatists living in the eastern part of the country. As talks between the two parties continue, Quigley said it would be helpful if the two sides could come to an understanding that would assure the Russian speaking people of the area that they would have some control over their own political status.

“They need to do something real in order to assure the Russian speakers in Eastern Ukraine that they’re situation is going to be acceptable and that they will have some kind of control over their own political status,” he said. “When I was involved, this was 20 years ago, with the Ukraine on behalf of the OSCE, that’s where we were headed. Crimea got some autonomy, it didn’t get as much as I thought it needed, and what I was proposing at that time, and what I think might be helpful now, is to have that autonomy with some kind of international oversight, that is you would have something set up under the constitution of Ukraine, but if the autonomy of the eastern region is infringed upon in some way, there would be recourse that could be taken at the international level.”



Obama should not align with India’s new leader

June 13, 2014

Professor John Quigley wrote an op-ed that appeared in The Californian and Gazettextra on why the U.S. should not align with India’s new leader. During the recent electoral campaign, which brought the Bharatiya Janata Party to power, one regional BJP leader said anyone who voted against Narendra Modi, the BJP candidate for prime minister, would have to leave India and go to Pakistan. Quigley said a statement like that coming from a BJP regional leader has worried India’s 140 million Muslims now that Modi has won the election and  taken office.

"f the Obama administration becomes overly cozy with Modi, Obama will be seen as anti-Muslim. Given the bad rap America has on that score, after our wars of the past decade, we don’t need to provide Muslims another reason not to like us. We risk bringing on ourselves more violence. Moreover, embracing Modi could give him the political space to keep India’s Muslims down,” he wrote. “The Obama administration should step cautiously. We have to have good relations with India. It is a country of 1.2 billion. But we have to let Modi know we are watching him.”



PRO: Administration was scrupulously even-handed

May 8, 2014

Professor John Quigley wrote an op-ed that appeared in the Olean Times Herald on the most recent peace talks in the Middle East. Quigley gave credit to Secretary of State John Kerry for remaining fair and even-handed during negotiations between Israel and Palestine, but in the end, he said, the negotiations set peace back, rather than advanced it.

“As Kerry doubtless knew, (Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin) Netanyahu was not serious about a peace agreement from the start. He has always opposed negotiations, preferring instead to take Palestine territory by accretion. Kerry’s nine-month gambit may have been an effort at peace, but the reality of it was collusion in Israel’s efforts to block peace.”



Despite US/EU Support for Kiev, Economic Divorce Between Ukraine and Russia is Unrealistic

April 23, 2014

Between The Lines’ Scott Harris spoke with John Quigley, Professor emeritus of international law at Ohio State University, who discusses the escalating crisis in Ukraine, the threat of civil war, Russian intervention and a new Cold War.



OPINION: US-Russia Cooperation Mutually Beneficial, Unlikely to Stall

April 23, 2014

US-Russia cooperation is mutually beneficial for both countries and neither side is ready to put bilateral relations at stake over the Ukrainian crisis, Professor Emeritus John Quigley told RIA Novosti in an interview.  

“The United States is getting a great advantage out of certain aspects of the relationship with Russia. I don’t think Obama wants to forego those advantages. And Russia gets advantages as well, so for both it is advantageous to maintain a good relationship,” he said.



Formed to halt Soviet expansion, NATO now useless

April 21, 2014

John B. Quigley, in an Intelligencer article, wrote:

"In the small Baltic country of Estonia, the easternmost county, called Ida-Viru, has a population of 150,000. Of these 150,000, only 20 percent are ethnic Estonians, while upward of 70 percent are Russian.

Suppose the following were to happen in Ida-Viru County. A referendum is held, asking whether the population wants to pull out of Estonia and join Russia. The referendum passes. The county government asks Russia to send troops. The Russian army enters and occupies the county."



John B. Quigley: Formed to halt expansion, but useless in current crisis

April 19, 2014

Professor John B. Quigley, in a column that ran in The Gulf Today, wrote:

"In the small Baltic country of Estonia, the easternmost county, called Ida-Viru, has a population of 150,000. Of these 150,000, only 20 per cent are ethnic Estonians, while upward of 70 per cent are Russian. Suppose the following were to happen in Ida-Viru County. A referendum is held, asking whether the population wants to pull out of Estonia and join Russia. The referendum passes. The county government asks Russia to send troops. The Russian army enters and occupies the county. Estonia, whose army can deploy no more than 700 soldiers, charges Russia with aggression. President Barack Obama announces that the United States will engage Russia militarily to defend Estonia."
 



What Role Has Russia Played in Eastern Ukraine?

April 18, 2014

John Quigley was interviewed by the Real News Network about Russia's role in Eastern Ukraine. He noted that the building occupations and protests in cities like Donestk looked like local initiatives, and are markedly less violent than some of those during the Euromaiden protests.

 



Pro: Formed to halt Soviet expansion, NATO useless in current crisis

April 17, 2014

In an op-ed that ran in GazetteXtra, Professor John B. Quigley addressed the question, "Should the U.S. consider withdrawing from NATO?"



No reasons to compare Russia’s actions in Crimea and Nazi Germany’s expansion back in 1930s - law professor

April 4, 2014

The Voice of Russia talked to Professor emeritus of international law John Quigley about Russia’s actions in Crimea.



With Yanukovych No Longer President, Who Is Coming To Power In Ukraine?

February 25, 2014

Professor John Quigley discussed the internal rivalries for power taking place within Ukraine and the history of its relations with Russia.



Let Ukrainians Determine Their Own Fate

February 21, 2014

Professor John Quigley wrote an op-ed for the Moscow Times about Ukraine's role in its future. International powers haven't hesitated to get involved, but Quigley writes that the decision should be made by the people of Ukraine.

"The ultimate choice must not be taken out of the hands of the population," he said. "Outside involvement should be directed at facilitating an outcome that is acceptable to the domestic parties."



5 most vital foreign policy moves for the US in 2014

January 5, 2014

Professor John B. Quigley wrote an op-ed for the Courier Journal about foreign policy moves he believes the United States needs to make in 2014. Among the moves is to declare victory in the “war on terror," and bring home the 60,000 troops in Europe.



Pro&Con: Deal may help, but entire area must be de-nuked — including Israel

November 30, 2013

Professor John B. Quigley wrote an op-ed for South Coast Today about the deal struck between Iran and the "5 plus 1" powers concerning Iran's nuclear powers. Quigley said the deal is a step in the direction of Iran not developing a nuclear program. However, if the "5 plus 1" powers want to eliminate nuclear weapons in the Middle East, Quigley says the powers need to address Israel's nuclear weapons.

 "Pressuring Iran while giving Israel only a wink and a nod lends a political cast to the efforts of the '5 plus 1,'" Quigley writes. "They could achieve the moral high ground — and reduce the risk of Iran going nuclear — if they committed to seeking elimination of nuclear weapons in the entire Middle East."



Pro: Interim deal struck with Iran shows promise

November 30, 2013

Professor John B. Quigley wrote an op-ed for South Coast Today about the deal struck between Iran and the "5 plus 1" powers concerning Iran's nuclear powers. Quigley said the deal is a step in the direction of Iran not developing a nuclear program. However, if the "5 plus 1" powers want to eliminate nuclear weapons in the Middle East, Quigley says the powers need to address Israel's nuclear weapons.

"Pressuring Iran while giving Israel only a wink and a nod lends a political cast to the efforts of the '5 plus 1,'" Quigley writes. "They could achieve the moral high ground — and reduce the risk of Iran going nuclear — if they committed to seeking elimination of nuclear weapons in the entire Middle East."



U.S. ties with Israel blind us to opportunities for a just peace

November 14, 2013

Professor John B. Quigley wrote an op-ed for Janesville Gazette about whether America's relationship with Israel is hurting the peace process in the Middle East. In the piece, Quigley writes that by supporting Israel, "we are helping Israel do Palestine in."

"In truth, we should be dealing with Israel’s occupation of the West Bank not by bilateral negotiations but in the U.N. Security Council," he said. "If the negotiations are to have any chance of success, we must at least acknowledge the illegality of Israel’s settlements and of its occupation."



Pro&Con: Israel can't afford to bomb Iran while Obama-Rouhani negotiate

October 19, 2013

Professor John B. Quigley wrote an op-ed for South Coast Today and Centre Daily Times examining Israel's view of the United States negotiating with Iran about its nuclear program. Quigley writes that Israel wants to pursue a military strike against Iran to prevent them from acquiring nuclear weapons, but is unable to do so while the United States tries to use diplomacy to address the issue.

"The sanctions in place on Iran in the nuclear standoff are doing tremendous damage to the people of Iran," Quigley writes. "One cannot punish a nation with economic sanctions without harming the population. A solution to the nuclear confrontation needs to be found — diplomacy is the right approach."



COMMENTARY: JOHN B. QUIGLEY Modern anti-war efforts focus on facts behind claims

September 7, 2013

Professor John B. Quigley wrote an op-ed piece for the Sunday Dispatch about how modern anti-war efforts, especially as they relate to Syria, are focused on examining facts and are less likely to blindly accept them.

"A new anti-war movement will be more sophisticated than in the past. In 2003, when Secretary of State Colin Powell gave the U.N. Security Council a package of false data about Iraq, the news media accepted it," Quigley writes. "Anti-war elements debunked Powell’s data within days, but that debunking did not reach the public at large. Now, as Secretary of State John Kerry recites new intelligence data to rationalize a missile strike in Syria, scrutiny is quick in coming."



However Congress votes on Syria, Obama can attack

September 4, 2013

Professor John. B. Quigley was quoted in a Columbus Dispatch article regarding President Barack Obama's rights to attack Syria with or without Congressional approval. Obama has made it clear that even if Congress does not approve, the Constitution gives him the power to execute a military strike. Quigley said the issue might not be that clear.

Quigley said the president is commander-in-chief, but he contends that “means you command them”after war is authorized by Congress. With Syria, Quigley said, “this is a bit of a stretch” to argue the president can launch on his own an attack “which doesn’t involve any threat to the United States.”



However Congress votes on Syria, Obama can attack

September 4, 2013

Professor John Quigley was quoted in an article by the Columbus Dispatch about President Barack Obama's rights to attack Syria. Without Congressional approval, Quigley said the president's powers are "very muddled," and that  is "a bit of a stretch” to argue the president can launch on his own an attack “which doesn’t involve any threat to the United States.”

 



Should U.S. cut aid to Egypt?

August 16, 2013

Professor John B. Quigley wrote an op-ed piece for The Philadelphia Inquirer about how U.S. military aid, which costs more than a billion dollars each year, should be cut amid the disturbance of peace in the Middle East.

"Congress should stop catering to military contractors and to Israel," Quigley writes. "It should end military aid to Egypt - and while it is at it, to Israel as well."



Turkey and Israel Determined To Leave 'Mavi Marmara' Behind

April 29, 2013

Professor John Quigley's letter to the editor of the New York Times was quoted in an article in Al Monitor regarding Turkey's attempt to leave the "Mavi Marmara" incident behind it. “The fact of Comoros registration opens up an additional avenue of recourse, whether or not compensation is arranged,” Quigley wrote. “The International Criminal Court has jurisdiction over acts committed on board a vessel flagged in a state that is party to the court’s statute. Turkey is not a party, but Comoros is. So the killings potentially fall within the court’s jurisdiction as war crimes, which would not be true had the Mavi Marmara been Turkish-flagged."



Recourse and the Flotilla Raid

April 25, 2013

Professor John Quigley wrote a letter to the editor of the New York Times regarding an article about the "Mavi Marmara" incident. "The article refers to possible compensation for the killings. But it mistakenly calls the Mavi Marmara Turkish-flagged. The Mavi Marmara had once been Turkish-flagged, but by the time of the incident it had been reflagged in Comoros," he wrote.



Obama seems more intent on placating Netanyahu than brokering peace

April 1, 2013

Professor John B. Quigley wrote an op-ed for the Centre Daily Times regarding President Obama's priority level in the Middle East. "Obama to his credit did call on his Israeli audience to put themselves in the position of the Palestine population — under the thumb of a foreign army. But nothing he said suggests a path to peace, or that he is making a serious effort," he wrote.



John Quigley | Our presence in unstable places encourages extremist elements

February 24, 2013

Professor John Quigley wrote an op-ed for the Centre Daily Times about the United States' role in extremist attitudes in the Middle East and northern Africa. "Our intervention in Libya brought an attack on a consulate we set up in the eastern Libyan city of Benghazi, resulting in the deaths of four U.S. officials," he claimed.



Defying U.S. and Israel, UN Votes to Recognize Palestine as "Nonmember Observer State"

December 5, 2012

Professor John Quigley was interviewed by Scott Harris of Between the Lines radio about the United Nations approval of Palestine as a nonmember observer state.



U.N. accepts Palestine as observer state by lopsided margin; U.S., 8 others opposed

November 29, 2012

Professor John Quigley was quoted in an article in The Tribune regarding the statehood of Palestine. “It’s a state, but it’s not yet independent in the sense of having control over its territory,” Quigley said.


Read more here: http://www.sanluisobispo.com/2012/11/29/2311354/un-accepts-palestine-as-observer.html#storylink=cpy



Should the US cut aid to Egypt? No, Morsi could help end conflict

September 10, 2012

Professor John Quigley wrote an opinion editorial in the Arizona Daily Star, and other McClatchy-Tribune newspapers, arguing that U.S. aid to Egypt should not be cut because of recent activities by the country's new president.



'Mass killers could legally purchase powerful weapons'

July 22, 2012

Professor John Quigley was on Press TV to discuss the movie theater shooting in Aurora, Colo., specifically regarding the ease of gun purchase in the United States.

“Weapons of some seriousness like weapons that this fellow bought are generally available for legal purchase,” Quigley said. “There are requirements, but those requirements are not very



Democracy is hard

July 13, 2012

Professor John Quigley wrote an article for the McClatchy-Tribune, which was also published by The Vindicator. The article centered on the topic of democracy.

“A major problem for the United States is even-handedness. During the Cold War, we overlooked autocracy if a country was on our side. Now we purport to promote democracy for all,” Quigley wrote.



Wikileaks founder Julian Assange awaits word on request for asylum in Ecuador

June 22, 2012

Professor John Quigley weighed in on Wikileaks founder Julian Assange’s request for asylum in Ecuador in a Public Radio International article.

Quigley said it is possible Assange could be extradited to the United States. “If he is sent to Sweden, it’s conceivable that the Swedish government could be asked by the United States for extradition, and that Sweden might agree to that request,” he said. “Ecuador is reliant on the United States in many ways. Economically, there’s quite a bit of leverage that the United States potentially has over Ecuador.”



Easing legally dubious sanctions would demonstrate good faith

June 4, 2012

Professor John B. Quigley wrote an article for the Centre Daily Times. In the article, which regarded whether Iran will develop nuclear weapons, Quigley wrote about the 1968 Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty.

“Under the treaty, existing nuclear powers are supposed to negotiate toward nuclear disarmament. But they have dallied,” Quigley wrote. “So the powers that developed nuclear weaponry early on are telling Iran it may not do the same.”



Should U.S. intervene militarily in Syria? No

April 27, 2012

Professor John Quigley wrote an article for The Columbus Dispatch in which he argues the United States military should not intervene in Syria.

“Any effort will have more credibility if the United States is in the background. But a recent assessment by the Obama administration concluded that the United States would have to be at the center of any military action, because of the technological capacity it could bring to bear,” Quigley wrote.



Kony 2012 plans to ‘cover’ the city

April 18, 2012

Professor John Quigley was quoted in an article in The Lantern about the credibility of a video against the African child soldier crisis titled “Kony 2012 Part II: Beyond Famous.”

“The video appears aimed more at organizing viewers through an emotional appeal. That said, there is good reason to accept the proposition that the LRA has committed atrocities as alleged in the film,” Quigley said.



Should U,S. Help Israel Cripple Iran's Nuclear Capability?

February 21, 2012

Professor John Quigley wrote an opinion editorial for the McClatchy-Tribune News Service arguing that the United States should not encourage of assist Israel in bombing or attacking Iran's alleged nuclear program.  Quigley wrote: "Israel would be on a stronger moral footing if it were to say that no one in the region should have nuclear weapons. To this day, Israel will not own up to having nuclear weapons."



 



Obama rationale for using drones not lawful'

January 31, 2012

Professor John Quigley was interviewed by phone by Press TV about President Barack Obama's rationale for the use of drones. He said, "Even if it is with the permission of the state, it is still a violation of human rights of the individuals involved."



Does the rise of Islamic movements pose a major threat to U.S. interests?

January 12, 2012

Professor John Quigley wrote an opinion editorial that was published in The Olympian in Washington state about the United States' policy regarding the Middle East.

"In the short term, Washington works to protect Israel and other U.S. allies, combat terrorism, rebuff Iran’s hegemonic ambitions, and support regional stability, all of which ensures the continued flow of oil to power Western economies," Quigley writes.

"In the long run, Washington promotes the advance of freedom and democracy in the region and elsewhere to expand the circle of nations that share our values, reduce threats to U.S. national security, expand opportunity for hundreds of millions of people and create new markets for U.S. investment.

"Unfortunately, the recent rise of Islamic movements in Egypt, Yemen, Libya and elsewhere threatens both our short- and long-run goals, generating profound new challenges for the United States."



Surge of Islam a response to bad policies from White House

January 8, 2012

Professor John Quigley wrote an opinion editorial that was published in the Great Falls Tribune in Montana about Islamic political parties assuming roles in the new order in Arab countries.

"It may not be irrelevant to ask how political Islam came to be a factor in the Middle East. Some fellow in a turban issuing fatwas?" Quigley writes.

"Hardly! To find the source of political Islam, don't go to a mosque.

"Try 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, which had no minaret on top last time I checked. American presidents have created political Islam and are still its main facilitators.

"Islam is the rallying cry for opposing outsiders, especially us."



PLO to seek membership in more UN agencies

November 1, 2011

Professor John Quigley was quoted in an Aljazeera article for his legal expertise and participation in an ICC-sponsored debate on the Palestine issue at The Hague last October.

The article, about the Palestine Liberation Organization’s intent to seek membership in more than a dozen United Nations organizations despite not being a member of the UN, quoted Quigley, "This is a determination by the same states that are members of the U.N. General Assembly."

If such organizations recognize Palestine, they will lose U.S. funding because Washington is barred by law from funding U.N. organizations that fully recognize Palestine, according to the article.



U.S. mustn’t act against Iran without more proof

October 28, 2011

Professor John Quigley wrote an opinion piece that was published by the Grand Forks Herald in North Dakota and the online news site JuneauEmpire.com in Alaska about why the United States should refrain from moving against Iran over an alleged plot to kill the Saudi Arabian ambassador.

"The State Department has been saying that the plot is an international crime," Quigley writes. "The relevant international document is the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of Crimes against Internationally Protected Persons. ... The convention requires states to punish murders of diplomats, including attempts. But the convention does not mention conspiracy. So, the act charged against the Texan-Iranian would not be a crime in many countries and is not a violation at the international level."



US needs more evidence of Iranian plot before escalating conflict in Middle East

October 27, 2011

Professor John Quigley wrote an article published in JuneauEmpire.com. The article, which weighed on U.S. plans to move against Iran, elaborated on an incident of an Iranian-Texan offered $100,000 to assassinate the Saudi Arabian ambassador.

Even if there was an assassination plot, and even if Iran was behind it, military action against Iran would be the wrong move. You can’t attack a country over an incident of this sort,” Quigley writes.



Analysis: Why the president was right

October 13, 2011

Professor John B. Quigley co-authored with Gabi Fahel a piece for Ma'an News Agency about President Mahmoud Abbas' decision to request UN membership for Palestine at the Security Council. The two say it is the right decision.

"Abbas has clearly exhausted every bilateral avenue to responsibly move the peace process forward and he has now prudently reached the conclusion that international consensus is not enough. He has concluded that it is now time for active international engagement beyond the confines of the bilateral negotiations box," they write.



Should the U.S. halt the use of unmanned ‘killer’ drones'? Pro: They make war too easy

September 26, 2011

Professor John Quigley wrote a column published by several news outlets including the Arizona Daily Star in which he discusses the use of unmanned drones in war.
 
"...there is a downside. Drones, say critics, make war too easy. If a president doesn't have to be concerned about putting our youth 'in harm's way,' it becomes much easier to go to war. Congress may lose control," he wrote.

 



Defying U.S., Palestine Seeks U.N. Recognition for Statehood

September 23, 2011

Professor Quigley was quoted by Inter Press Service in an article detailing Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas's application to the U.N. for official statehood.

Abbas' statement about expediting the transmission suggests he is not acceding to the U.S. request that action in the Security Council on the application be delayed for some period of time, the article said.

"Abbas did not mention proceeding at this time to the General Assembly for a resolution that would declare that the Palestine observer mission is the mission of a state," Quigley said.



Palestine a State Already, Some Scholars Argue

September 20, 2011

Professor John Quigley was quoted by Voice of America in an article discussing Palestine's statehood, which is currently not recognized by the United Nations. Quigley argues that Palestine is in fact a sovereign state, has been since declaring their statehood in 1988, which the U.N. refused to recognize.

According to Quigley, Palestine meets all the criteria for statehood, and a bid to the U.N. would be an unnecessary formality.

“That is, I think Palestine is a state presently, and that what would be done at the U.N. would simply be a confirmation of that,” said Quigley, author of The Statehood of Palestine: International Law in the Middle East Conflict.

Quigley also said he sees a reason for Palestine to make an official bid for statehood.

“The International Criminal Court,” says Quigley, “would be likely to go ahead with investigating the alleged war crimes…that may have been committed in Palestine’s territory.”



Twists in the road to Palestinian statehood

September 17, 2011

Professor Quigley was interviewed by the Toronto Star in an article discussing Palestine's bid for statehood. Quigley answered several questions in the question-and-answer style article.



Opening the route

September 11, 2011

Professor John Quigley penned an opinion piece for thedailynewsegypt.com about the Palmer report opening the route to international enforcement action in its conclusion that Israel's interception of the Gaza flotilla vessels in 2010 was lawful. He disagrees with the finding and explains why.



Palestinian leaders weigh U.N. options

July 13, 2011

Professor John Quigley was mentioned in a United Press International story about Palestinians' consideration of bypassing the U.N. Security Council and going directly to the General Assembly when it requests admission to the United Nations in September. "Any state that is peace-loving and that is willing and able to carry out the [U.N Charter] obligations is supposed to be admitted," Quigley, an international law professor, said during a panel discussion at the Palestine Center.



Palestinian UN bid enters unknown territory

May 23, 2011

Professor John Quigley was quoted in an Associated Press article about President Obama's comment that a vote in the United Nation's would never create a Palestinian state. The General Assembly has never admitted a member without a favorable ruling of the Security Council, said John B. Quigley, an international law professor at Ohio State University. But, he said, the Palestinians and their supporters could try to rally arguments for the assembly to bypass council approval.

Quigley cited an advisory ruling from the International Court of Justice — a U.N. body — that a decision on membership must not involve political considerations and should only determine if a would-be member is peace-loving and meets the criteria for statehood. Conceivably, General Assembly members could claim that a U.S. veto was issued for inappropriate reasons, opening legal arguments at the U.N.

That may be a hard case for them to make, however. Quigley noted that another ICJ advisory ruling states a recommendation from the Security Council is needed for U.N. membership.



US aid to Pakistan a waste

May 5, 2011

Professor John B. Quigley wrote an opinion editorial column in dozens of McClatchy-Tribune newspapers about U.S. aid to Pakistan.



Brotherhood poses no threat

March 31, 2011

Professor John B. Quigley wrote an op-ed in The Bellingham Herald and multiple other newspapers on The Muslim Brotherhood's role in Egypt. "The Muslim Brotherhood is no threat to democratic development in Egypt. The Brotherhood is a well organized movement in Egypt, but it was not the spark for the protests that led to the recent change in government," Quigley wrote.



What Is the Muslim Brotherhood?

February 26, 2011

Professor John Quigley was quoted in an ABCNews.com story about the Muslim Brotherhood emerging as one of the most powerful opposition groups in Egypt. The story states: “In the show, international law expert John Quigley Skypes in with Ross from Ohio State University to discuss Davis' case and answer viewer questions from Twitter. In Davis' case, it's not enough to have a diplomatic passport, Quigley said.”



Not if the U.S. prods Israel to begin negotiating fairly with Palestine

February 10, 2011

Professor John B. Quigley published and Opinion Editorial in the Sacramento Bee about the ascendance of Hezbollah in Lebanon in regards to the Israeli-Palestinian peace negotiations. The story states: “Were Israel to come to terms with Palestine on the basis of rights and obligations as internationally recognized - a reasonable accommodation on borders, on Jerusalem, and on repatriation of Palestine refugees - Israel would diminish the hostility it faces in the Arab world. Israel would have less to worry about from Hezbollah.”



Recognize Palestine now

December 30, 2010

Professor John Quigley recently published an Opinion Editorial in the Youngstown Vindicator about the United States formally recognizing Palestine as a state and establishing full diplomatic relations with it in hopes of energizing Israeli-Palestinian negotiations. The story states: “The United States cannot pretend to be impartial between the two parties it is trying to bring together when it relegates one of them to a second-class status. The Obama administration portrays itself as an ‘honest broker’ between Israel and Palestine, but withholding formal recognition from Palestine forces Palestine to contest with Israel with one arm behind its back.”



Hit-and-miss efforts in Afghanistan simply aren't worth more U.S. fatalities

November 18, 2010

Professor John Quigley recently published an opinion-editorial in the Sacramento Bee, and more than 21 other newspapers, about fatalities in Afghanistan not being worth the efforts. The story states: “If we do not need to be in Afghanistan to fight al-Qaeda, it is hard to understand why we are there. But we just put in extra troops for a "surge" offensive in the Kandahar area. And the current deadline for a drawdown would have us there in the present full strength to July 2011.”



Book Review: "The Statehood of Palestine: International Law in the Middle East Conflict"

November 3, 2010

Professor John Quigley’s new book, The Statehood of Palestine: International Law in the Middle East Conflict, was reviewed on the Media Monitors Network web site. The review stated: “Will the Palestinians ask the United Nations to recognize their state? This has been an oft-asked question, particularly in recent weeks, as the American-mediated peace process has stalemated once Israel continued to build illegal settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territories. But what if Palestine is already a state? This is the argument made by John Quigley, professor of international and comparative law at the Ohio State University Law School and author of the newly published book The Statehood of Palestine: International Law in the Middle East Conflict.”



Timid surge, rampant corruption make U.S. troops sitting ducks

August 19, 2010

Professor John Quigley wrote an opinion editorial that was published in the Lexington Herald-Leader and many other newspapers across the country. Quigley wrote in the current condition of the war in Iraq and the state of the policies set by the Obama administration: "Our efforts to stop corruption in aid projects are backfiring. When we sidestep local officials thought to be skimming, we turn them and other local power brokers against us. There does not seem to be a way of ensuring that project funds are used properly without damaging our own interests in the process."



Israeli Flotilla Attack May Violate International, Maritime Laws

June 15, 2010

Professor John Quigley was quoted in an Inter Press Service story about the legality of an Israeli attack on ships in international waters. The story states: “John Quigley, professor of international law at Ohio State University, told IPS boarding a flagged vessel on the high seas is impermissible without the consent of the flag state.”



Misguided policies supporting a corrupt Karzai help al-qaida recruit terrorists to hit America

June 3, 2010

Professor John Quigley wrote an Opinion Editorial that was published in several McClatchy Newspapers about Afghanistan and whether or not President Obama’s efforts are doomed for failure. The piece states: “Karzai's corruption is conceded to be endemic. Much of the money we pour into Afghanistan is lining the pockets of a fortunate few. The election he recently ‘won’ was a joke.”



Rogue firms shame the good name of U.S. military forces

March 20, 2010

Professor John Quigley published an opinion editorial that was published in several McClatchy-owned newspapers around the country discussing the use of security contractors in the Middle East. The story states: “Congress should just say no. Anyone who is abroad on our behalf with capacity to kill should be under public control.”



Commentary: Federal law requires airline bombing suspects to be tried in civilian courts

February 4, 2010

Professor John Quigley published an Opinion Editorial for McClatchy-Tribune News Services that was printed in several newspapers across the country. The editorial discusses why he thinks Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab should be tried in civilian courts. The editorial states: “A cooperating suspect hopes for a lighter sentence. In a case like Abdulmutallab's, the suspect may relish the platform to speak and may say more in public than he would in a basement cell.”



Obama risks being sucked into a quagmire

January 3, 2010

Professor John Quigley published an Op-Ed that was published in several newspapers across the country. The column addressed the question: “Will Afghanistan become a quagmire in 2010?” Quigley’s column stated: “So the Obama administration, like its predecessors, is seen as allowing Israel to swallow up Palestinian land, financed by the U.S. taxpayer. The Palestinians are squeezed, and we are seen as responsible. That's a perfect recruitment scenario for bin Laden.”



The perils of prosecuting international crimes

August 6, 2009

Professor John Quigley was interviewed on a South African radio station discussing the legal issues that may arise from the prosecution of international crimes. The link to the interview is here: http://www.pambazuka.org/images/articles/445/quigley.mp3



Chaos Mars U.N. Conference On Racism

April 20, 2009

Professor John Quigley was mentioned in a NPR story about the United Nations Conference on Racism. The story stated: “John Quigley, a professor of international law at Ohio State University, says it would have been better for the United States to remain engaged in the Durban process. ‘I think the U.S. criticism of the 2001 conference was overblown. ... There was a lot of criticism of Israel for its general policies, but it couldn't fairly be criticized as anti-Semitic,’ Quigley said.”



U.S. embassy in Iran could help defuse Mideast time bomb

February 12, 2009

Professor John Quigley published an Opinion Editorial in several McClatchy-owned newspapers regarding the possibility of opening a U.S. embassy in Iran. He states: “Re-establishing diplomatic relations would offer the possibility of engaging Iran on the contentious issues that currently separate our countries. Iran's nuclear program has been issue No. 1 of late. Iran as a major oil producer affects energy supply.”



U.S. embassy in Iran could help defuse Mideast time bomb

February 9, 2009

Professor John Quigley published an Opinion Editorial in several McClatchy-owned newspapers regarding the possibility of opening a U.S. embassy in Iran. He states: “Re-establishing diplomatic relations would offer the possibility of engaging Iran on the contentious issues that currently separate our countries. Iran's nuclear program has been issue No. 1 of late. Iran as a major oil producer affects energy supply.”



Years of U.N. refusal to impose sanctions have led to peaceless quagmire

January 9, 2009

Professor John Quigley had an Opinion-Editorial published in several newspapers regarding the conflict between Israel and Gaza. He states: “It's time for the United Nations to shed its impotency and impose tough sanctions on Israel. That would be the least the United Nations could do after sitting silently for years through a ‘peace process’ that Israel has used as a cover to grab Palestinian land.”



Georgian conflict provoked by U.S. in Iraq and its military moves in Eastern Europe

August 22, 2008

Professor John B. Quigley had an Opinion Editorial published in The Olympian regarding recent conflict between Russia and Georgia. “Russia is not out to retake the former Soviet republics, despite its dawdling in withdrawing forces from Georgia. It was after all Georgia, not Russia, that started the fighting in South Ossetia on Aug. 7.”



After Iraq, U.S. has no moral capital to lead

July 3, 2008

Professor John Quigley wrote an Opinion Editorial for McClatchy newspapers regarding his views on how the United States’ role in foreign affairs will change after the Iraq war. “Public opinion around the world does not look favorably on the United States right now. We should reassess our own approach to dealing with the rest of the world before we try to organize other countries.”



Who wants an old Nazi?

June 5, 2008

Professor John Quigley was quoted in an Associated Press story that was published in newspapers throughout Ohio. The story was about the possible difficulties deporting an Ohio man whose citizenship was revoked based on evidence he was a Nazi guard during World War II. The story states: “John Quigley, a law professor at the Moritz College of Law at Ohio State University who has written about genocide and international law issues, said generally a person’s age and past could play into a country’s willingness to accept someone being deported.”



Plain talk with Hamas could be best way to Mideast peace

May 9, 2008

Professor John Quigley had an Opinion-Editorial published in more than 20 newspapers – including the Sacramento Bee, Kansas City Star, and Raleigh News & Observer – in May regarding the U.S. relations with Hamas. The editorial states: “The U.S. is a greater obstacle than Hamas to Israeli-Palestinian peace. Given the bankruptcy of the U.S. approach, Carter's initiative with Hamas can hardly do harm. It may even do some good. Making peace will require total involvement on both sides of the Israeli-Palestinian divide.”



Is Putin trying to revive Cold War with the U.S.?

January 20, 2008

An Opinion Editorial written by Professor John B. Quigley was published in The Columbus Dispatch, as well as by papers in Duluth, Minn., Kansas City, Mo., Charlotte, N.C., Sacramento, Calif., and other cities. The point-counterpoint column answered the question: Is Putin trying to revive the Cold War with the U.S.? “If we pulled out of Iraq, stopped threatening Iran and promoted a just Israeli-Palestinian peace, we might find world leaders like Putin encouraging us, instead of confronting us,” Quigley wrote.



Would pre-emptive strike against Iran hurt U.S.?

November 6, 2007

Professor John Quigley has had an Opinion Editorial published in several newspapers, including the Fort Worth Star-Telegram and the Charlotte Observer. The editorial discussed the possible implications of a United States attack of Iran. “Whatever risk Iran may pose, and it is not clear that it does, a military attack is not the solution. The immediate consequences are easy to predict. We further inflame feelings against us in the Middle East, and beyond. The resulting anti-American sentiment makes it more difficult for our allies to support us.”



Focus on foreign policy, which is the root cause of the rise in terrorism

September 10, 2007

Professor John Quigley published an Opinion Editorial that was distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services. The editorial was picked up by The Columbus Dispatch and other newspapers. Quigley said in his piece that domestic terror may be linked to the U.S.’s Mideast policies. “The hostility that leads to terrorism is not a product of personal difficulties in which individual Muslims may find themselves. It is more plausibly explained as a response to our own policies in the Middle East — what we are doing in Iraq and Afghanistan, and what we have done over the years on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. That hostility is widely shared through the Middle East and leads some to resort to violence.”



Should people who report terrorist suspicion be exempt from suits?

June 4, 2007

Professor John B. Quigley analyzes the laws involving individuals who report suspicious activity in a Columbus Dispatch OpEd.



Would a nuclear-armed Iran use its weapons?; Unemployed bombs are more useful

February 26, 2007

Professor John B. Quigley wrote an op-ed that appeared in the Fort Worth Star-Telegram discussing Iran's use of nuclear weapons.



Congress is limited in ability to halt war

January 21, 2007

Professor John Quigley is quoted in this article from the Austin American Statesman on Congress' power to halt war. "Congress really hasn't invoked the power it has under the Constitution very successfully," said Quigley. "Once the president gets the country involved in something, the decision about exactly how to extricate one from it is very difficult, and often it does put the Congress in the position of appearing unpatriotic or not supportive of the troops." The Constitution gives Congress the power of the purse. If the body wants to cut off funding for the Iraq war, "it clearly has the authority to do it," Quigley said.



Pro/Con: Should U.S. drop policy on Israel's right to exist?

January 14, 2007

In this op-ed from The Pueblo Chieftain (Pueblo, Colo.), Professor John B. Quigley's piece is entitled "PRO: Bush can spur Hamas into peace talks." Also see "The diplomatic key to Middle East peace" (The Beacon Journal, Akron, Ohio).



Saddam trial forges on: Tighter security surrounds Hussein case after killing of 2 defense lawyers and foiled murder plot

November 28, 2005

In a Newsday article printed in the Chicago Tribune about the trial of Saddam Hussein, Professor John B. Quigley said that it is much more difficult than a typical murder trial.



Short leash for Hussein during trial

October 19, 2005

In this Chicago Tribune story (from Newsday) Professor John B. Quigley said that removing Saddam from the court can be problematic; it seems unfair to be trying somebody when he's not present.



Government appeal of ruling on arrest likely to delay trial; Judge said detention illegal, confession OK

September 16, 2005

In this Columbus Dispatch story about the U.S. government's decision to appeal a decision by a federal judge that the arrest of a terrorism suspect was illegal, Professor John B. Quigley expressed surprise that the government chose to appeal.