Faculty in the News

Terri L. Enns Media Hits

The following is a list of selected media coverage for Terri L. Enns. The links below will direct you to sites that are not affiliated with the Moritz College of Law. They are subject to change, and some may expire or require registration as time passes.

 

Put-in-Bay police chief wants to add part-time dispatcher

December 29, 2010

Professor Terri Enns was recently mentioned in a Port Clinton News Herald story about Put-in-Bay police chief hoping to hire a dispatcher who would also respond to public records requests and media inquiries. The story states: “Stone told the newspaper the police department cannot release full reports until the cases involving the reports have been resolved in court. But two attorneys -- Terri Enns, clinical professor of law at Ohio State University's Moritz College of Law, and Cleveland attorney David Marburger, who specializes in First Amendment issues and media law -- said the incident reports are public record whether the case is resolved or not.”



Put-in-Bay police: Strange calls and a code of silence

November 27, 2010

Professor Terri Enns was recently quoted in a Mansfield News Journal story about the vagueness and unavailability of public police records on Put-in-Bay. The story states: “‘The bottom line is an incident report is public record,’ said Terri Enns, a professor at The Ohio State University's Moritz College of Law. ‘An unredacted copy has to be given over to the requester.’”



Put-in-Bay police keep public info private

November 16, 2010

Professor Terri Enns was quoted in The News Messenger in a story about Put-in-Bay police not disclosing police reports. The story states: “‘The bottom line is an incident report is public record,’ said Terri Enns, clinical professor of law at Ohio State University’s Moritz College of Law. ‘An unredacted copy has to be given over to the requester.’”



Rough start only got worse for Democrats

November 3, 2010

Professor Terri Enns was quoted in The Lantern in a story about Republican Rob Portman winning Ohio’s open Senate seat. The story states: “‘Portman gets talked about as a potential Republican candidate for president,’ said Terri Enns, clinical professor of law at Ohio State's Moritz College of Law.”



Policitican accused of buying votes with $2 bills says 'that's just crazy'

December 13, 2009

Professor Terri Enns was quoted in a Bellville, Ill., News Democrat story about a East St. Louis, Ill., politician who was being criticized for mailing $2 bills along with his annual holiday cards. The story stated: "‘It's very situation specific. Does the money influence the person?’ Enns said of McGaughy's Christmas letter. ‘Campaigns give things out. They throw candy. They give out nail files. And other things: is it knowingly to influence voting? These are things a court would look at.’”



Vote-fraud cases linger from 2008

November 16, 2009

Professor Terri Enns was mentioned in a Columbus Dispatch story about ongoing voter fraud cases from the November 2008 election. The story states: “Proving someone's intent is never easy, and it's also difficult to draw clear lines for how long someone must live in Ohio before or after an election to be considered a resident, said Terri Enns, a professor of election law at Ohio State University's Moritz College of Law.”



McCain's Warning on Voter Fraud Gets Details Wrong: Ann Woolner

October 24, 2008

Professor Terri Enns was quoted in a Bloomberg News column about voter fraud in Ohio. The story states: “‘Keep in mind with these stories about potentially bad registrations, they don't equal bad votes,’ says Terri Enns, a senior fellow at Election Law @ Moritz, out of Ohio State University.”



Experts warn of voting meltdowns on Nov. 4

October 15, 2008

Professor Terri Enns was quoted in a Detroit News story regarding potential problems in the Nov. 4 primary election. The story states: “‘What we're worried about is the registration lists,’ said Terri Enns, a law professor at Ohio State University. Ohio courts are considering whether Brunner is required to supply lists of questionable registrations to county election boards.”



Palestra.net investigates Ohio early voting

October 13, 2008

Professor Terri Enns and Election Law @ Moritz Analyst Sarah Cherry were featured in a Palestra.net story about Ohio early voting. The story discusses absentee voting and nonprofit, and get-out-the-vote organizations.



7-Yr.-Old Gets An ACORN Vote

October 12, 2008

Professor Terri Enns was quoted in a New York Post story about a 7-year-old girl who was registered to vote by the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now. The story says: “The ACORN shenanigans likely won't rise to actual voting fraud, stressed election law expert Terri Enns at Ohio State University. ‘ACORN's problematic registrations create extra work for election boards, because they have to check them, but it's not double voting,’ she said.”



Ballot Battle Popping in Indiana

October 10, 2008

Professor Terri Enns was quoted in an ABCNews.com story about a legal challenge regarding early voting locations in Indiana. The story states: “‘More states are offering absentee balloting now,’ says Terri Enns, a senior fellow of election law at Moritz College of Law at Ohio State University. ‘It's in response to the inconvenience of 2004 with long lines,’ she says. ‘It's more convenient.’”



Election loophole could cause problems in Ohio

September 30, 2008

Professor Terri Enns was featured on Fox and Friends on the FoxNews Network for a story about new Ohio voters being able to register during a five-day window and vote almost immediately afterwards. Professor Enns said: “When you register, you just don't go in and say ‘hello,’ register, and ‘give me my ballot.’ You have to take in information and documents. The check can be done to say whether you are who you are say you, are and whether you are an eligible voter.”



2 Officials Face Residency Scrutiny

August 24, 2008

Professor Terri Enns was quoted in the Lancaster Eagle Gazette in a story regarding discrepancies in candidates’ residencies. "It depends on where you are in the process," Enns said. "If you're a candidate up for re-election, it could go directly to the Supreme Court for a decision. If not, it would go to the Court of Common Pleas."



Vote in your pajamas

August 14, 2008

Professor Terri Enns was quoted in The Other Paper in a story about absentee voting. The story stated: “Terri Enns didn’t like the idea of dedicating an entire month for no-fault absentee voting when the Ohio legislature made it so three years ago. Today, as the Franklin County Board of Elections is pushing for voters to cast their general election decisions from the comfort of their homes to alleviate long lines at the polls, Enns still isn’t convinced it’s a good idea. ‘I am a fan of allowing a variety of ways of voting. I am not a fan of a 35-day window in which you can cast your absentee ballot,’ said Enns, senior fellow of election law at Ohio State University’s Moritz College of Law. ‘Things change—you might change your mind about an issue or candidate you may have already voted on.’”



Mayor is awash in campaign cash

November 1, 2007

Professor Terri Enns was quoted in a Columbus Dispatch story about how Columbus Mayor Mike Coleman has spent his campaign funds. “Campaign laws give politicians wide latitude, said Terri Enns, a professor of election law at Ohio State University's Moritz College of Law. The law, she said, weighs four factors: ‘Is it a legitimate, verifiable, ordinary or necessary expense?’”



Christian Exodus leader still planning to move to Upstate

July 10, 2007

Professor Terri Enns was quoted in the Anderson, S.C., Independent-Mail regarding the leader of a religious group there who was urging members of his affiliated group, the Christian Exodus, to move to Anderson County, S.C., in attempts to sway elections there. The group advocates a strictly literal interpretation of the Constitution. Enns said the group was doing nothing illegal by moving into one voting jurisdiction. “Voting requirement doesn’t regard what your intent is. Your intent is to impact an election. That’s why we all vote,” Enns said. “What the critical question would be is, do they intend to be a resident of the state or county.”



Ohio's school funding case leads to singing, sermonizing

March 22, 2007

Professor Terri Enns is quoted in this Associated Press story (from the Akron Beacon Journal) about Ohio's system of funding schools being ruled unconstitutional a decade ago by the state Supreme Court and people having found ways to take the lawsuit beyond piles of court documents. Enns said that Korea would seem an even more unlikely place to get an education on the lawsuit, but a student who traveled to study law at Ohio State University already knew about the case when it was discussed in a class in February. The student told the class that the case had been of interest in her home country because of its relationship to Korea's own school funding issues, Enns said.



Problems "sporadic, not systemic," in otherwise smooth election

November 8, 2006

Professor Terri Enns described voting problems as "sporadic, not systemic" in this Associated Press story from The Beacon Journal. "Those complaints we heard about in 2004 on a widespread basis just didn't happen," Enns said. "Preparation was perhaps a little better both on the part of voters and on the part of poll workers."



Would-be candidate claims law unfairly restricts independents

August 21, 2006

In the Associated Press story from The Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio), Professor Terri Enns said independents aren't able to perform any legally defined "affirmative acts," such as voting in a primary or serving on a party committee.



Padgett prepares to move ahead

August 11, 2006

Professor Terri Enns said in this Times Reporter (New Philadelphia, Ohio) story that her interpretation of applicable Ohio law supports Joys Padgett's eligibility despite reports that the state's so-called "sore-loser provision" could block it.



Ohio law may complicate GOP plans in choosing Ney replacement

August 8, 2006

In this Associated Press story that appeared in the Akron Beacon Journal, Professor Terri Enns is quoted on the possibility that county party officials could appoint a replacement to run in the general election if Bob Ney were to wait until after the 80-day window. That would avoid the need for a primary and could be a way around the "sore loser" law, which is silent about candidates who are appointed, said Enns "There's going to be a court battle. That's the thing I can be most sure of," she said. The story also appeared in The News-Sentinel (Fort Wayne, Ind.) and Contra Costa Times (San Francisco).



U.S. Court Permits GOP Poll Challengers in Ohio

November 2, 2004

A story reported by Bloomberg discussed the decision of the Sixth Circuit to allow challengers to be present in Ohio polling places. Professor Terri Enns noted that challengers at polling places could delay voting and lead to lawsuits after the election.



Long Gone But Still Registered

October 24, 2004

Professor Terri Enns, a member of the Election Law @ Moritz team, noted in the Columbus Dispatch that it is disturbing that individuals who have moved away are still on the Franklin County voter rolls. She said that there are potential problems, but there are a lot of Election Day safeguards to keep it from swaying the election.