Faculty in the News

Daniel C.K. Chow Media Hits

The following is a list of selected media coverage for Daniel C.K. Chow. The links below will direct you to sites that are not affiliated with the Moritz College of Law. They are subject to change, and some may expire or require registration as time passes.

 

Hong Kong Graft Charges Pressure City Chief to Crack Down

July 15, 2012

Professor Daniel Chow was referred to in a Bloomberg article for his writing about the United States Foreign Corrupt Practices Act’s effect in China for the Wisconsin Law Review.

In the article, which focused on Hong Kong’s anti-graft agency, noted Chow wrote in his article, “Giving kickbacks or providing favors to authorities ‘occurs innumerable times on a daily basis in China.’”



FCPA issues in China

June 1, 2012

Professor Daniel Chow wrote an article for Morning Whistle, which was also published on ChinaLawBlog.

In the article, Chow raised concerns about the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act causing problems for multinational companies. “China’s rise as a global economic power and its culture, which tolerates many forms of corruption in business, indicate that many more FCPA cases involving China will rise in the future,” Chow wrote.



Inside a Chinese Counterfeiting Ring

March 24, 2011

Professor Daniel C.K. Chow was quoted in the Minyanville in an article focusing on counterfeit goods from China.   “We have never seen a problem of this size and magnitude in world history. There’s more counterfeiting going on in China now than we've ever seen anywyere," Chow said.  



Space wants national referendum on free trade

September 30, 2010

Professor Daniel Chow was recently quoted in a Mansfield News Journal story about U.S. Rep. Zack Space submitting legislation regarding free trade. He is hoping for a national referendum before any new trade deal passes. The story states: “Daniel Chow, a law professor at The Ohio State University, laughed when he heard Space's proposal. ‘I've never heard of such a thing,’ he said. ‘That's something that's never been done.’”



Need to know

June 23, 2010

Professor Daniel C.K. Chow was mentioned in a Bangkok Post story that discusses a bill introduced by Senator Joseph Lieberman, who oversees the Department of Homeland Security. The bill would make it possible for the president to shut off parts of the internet that are not vital to national safety in times of emergency. The article mentions the questionable validity of copyright violation statistics: “Ohio State University law professor Daniel Chow suggested the government should press the vendors to supply more data with their numbers, which would be easy to do if the numbers are correct.”



Experts: Losses Due to Piracy Are Exaggerated

June 17, 2010

Professor Daniel C.K. Chow was mentioned in a Tomsguide.com story about exaggerated losses because of Chinese piracy. The story states: “Ohio State University law professor Daniel Chow added that the USITC should push for more concrete data from the industries--data that will actually back up their claims that millions have been lost due to piracy. He also said that Chinese officials are growing weary of raids, and that a different, more educational approach should be taken to reduce the amount of piracy taking place in China.”



US Panel Looks at Intellectual Property Violations in China

June 15, 2010

Professor Dan Chow was quoted in a PC World story about intellectual property violations in China. The story stemmed from a U.S. International Trade Commission hearing in which Chow testified. The story states: “Part of the problem, said Ohio State's Chow, is that copyright enforcement in China is uneven. Fines for counterfeiting are small, and the Chinese government often sells confiscated counterfeiting equipment back to infringers at auction, he said. Jail time is ‘not much of a deterrent because it tends to be very rare,’ he said.”



College 'Embassies' Advance Their Interests Abroad

April 25, 2010

Professor Dan Chow was mentioned in a Chronicle of Higher Education story about the University’s need international gateways. The story states: “In China, Daniel C.K. Chow, a law professor who once worked for a multinational company there, has been instrumental in helping Ohio State navigate the country's legal system.”



2009 Moritz graduate serves as acting director of OSU's China Gateway

April 13, 2010

Professor Dan Chow was quoted in a Daily Reporter story about Ohio State’s new China Gateway. Acting director of the Gateway is Moritz LL.M. alumna Phoebe You. The story states: "‘(The Gateway) will be used to recruit students, it will be used as a base for faculty to do research in China, it will be a place for networking with our alumni in China,’ said Chow.”



Applied DNA Sciences Signs Contract With Asian Printer

January 12, 2010

Professor Dan Chow was quoted in a story that appeared on CNNMonday.com about a DNA-based security solutions company signing a supply agreement with a printing company headquartered in Asia. The story stated: "‘We have never seen a problem of this size and magnitude in world history. There's more counterfeiting going on in China now than we've ever seen anywhere,’ stated Dan Chow, a law professor at Ohio State University who specializes in Chinese counterfeiting on CBS's ‘60 Minutes.’ ‘We know that 15 to 20 percent of all goods in China are counterfeit.’”



Counterfeiting in China thrives: experts

January 4, 2010

Professor Daniel Chow was quoted in an AFP story about counterfeiting and piracy in China. The story states: “‘Local protectionism and government corruption are the real issue,’ Daniel Chow, a professor at the Ohio State University College of Law, told AFP. ‘The central government is probably sincere but enforcement occurs at the local level, and local governments have a direct and indirect interest in protecting counterfeiting, which is important to the local economy.’”



Chinese bloggers get free rein as earthquake slows censors

May 20, 2008

Professor Daniel Chow was quoted in a ComputerWorld.com story about Chinese bloggers who will be able to write freely about the recent earthquake. The story states: “Daniel Chow, a law professor at Ohio State University who focuses on Chinese matters, said that the government has typically prevented any information pertaining to disasters from leaving the country until well after the event. ‘China has come under a lot of criticism lately because of the Tibet protests,’ Chow said. ‘This is a way for China to get some favorable international publicity. The Chinese government wants to show that it is caring for its people and is responding well to a disaster.’”



Bill would ban sale of foreign-made flags

May 14, 2008

Professor Daniel Chow was quoted in a Columbus Dispatch story about a bill that would ban the sale of foreign made American flags in Ohio. The story states: “Daniel Chow, a law professor at Ohio State University with expertise in foreign-trade law, said that the United States generally cannot discriminate against foreign goods. Senate Bill 316 may violate that principle, he said, but the GATT has an exception for protecting public morals. ‘For the flag, there might be an argument that there's a kind of public moral issue here,’ Chow said. Unless China would challenge the law with the World Trade Organization, nothing is certain, he said.”



Thailand's counterfeit pipeline

November 28, 2007

Professor Daniel C.K. Chow was quoted in a Columbus Dispatch story regarding an ongoing series on counterfeiting in Asia. Chow said that the lack of tough punishments for counterfeiters is contributing to the ongoing problem. "The penalty is often death for narcotics, whereas if you're a counterfeiter, people say, 'OK, you're just a businessman,' " said Daniel C.K. Chow, an Ohio State University law professor and a counterfeiting expert. The lack of enforcement is the main reason the trade flourishes as never before, he said.



Report: Asia-based counterfeits continues to hurt U.S. companies

November 27, 2007

Professor Daniel C.K. Chow was quoted in an Associated Press story that was published in the International Herald Tribune and other papers. The story, which was highlighting a Columbus Dispatch investigation, discusses the growing problem of counterfeiting in China. “Ohio State University law professor Daniel C.K. Chow spent two years in China leading anti-counterfeiting efforts for Cincinnati-based Procter & Gamble. Because tens of millions of Chinese depend on fake goods for their livelihood, local officials ignore or even profit from the trade, he said. ‘Part of the risk of investing overseas is that some of your technology is going to get stolen,’ he said. ‘China has unprecedented access to the world's technology, and it's the leading counterfeiter in the world. That's not a coincidence.’”



In the land of counterfeit

November 25, 2007

Professor Daniel C.K. Chow was quoted in a Columbus Dispatch story regarding the sale of counterfeit goods in China. The story states: "Ohio State University law professor Daniel C.K. Chow spent two years in China leading anti-counterfeiting efforts for the consumer products giant Procter & Gamble. Because tens of millions of Chinese depend on fake goods for their livelihood, he said, local officials ignore or even profit from the trade. 'Most consumers think it's harmless fun to buy knockoffs,' Chow said. 'But if you buy counterfeit products, you are supporting organized crime and all the abuses that come with it, including narcotics, smuggling and prostitution.'"



China tightens up

August 9, 2007

Professor Daniel Chow was quoted in a Nature.com story regarding plans to revamp China’s drug regulations. Chow specializes in intellectual-property issues in China. (Subscription required)



China imports cause many to be freighted with worry

July 29, 2007

Professor Daniel Chow was quoted in a Toledo Blade story regarding China’s lax health and safety standards and how they translate into sometimes tainted products being imported into the United States. “There are extreme quality-control problems because the people who engage in manufacturing there do engage in shortcuts,” he said. “They don’t intend to kill people, but there’s very lax control of manufacturing and it leads to negligence and carelessness.”



A growing epidemic of fake medications in Asia

February 20, 2007

In this International Herald Tribune story on an "epidemic of counterfeits" of life-saving drugs in Asia, professor Daniel C.K. Chow said he believed that the authorities would pursue counterfeiters "ruthlessly" for killing Chinese citizens but be more lax about drugs for export. "The counterfeiters aren't stupid," he said. "They don't want anyone beating down the door in the middle of the night and dragging them away, so they make drugs for sale outside the country."



Big Blue helps companies create technologies that may fill its intellectual property stable

March 17, 2006

In a story on redherring.com about IBM's partnership that helps other companies develop new technologies, Professor Daniel C.K. Chow said that small companies would not have the resources to develop a great idea on their own.



Calls for Chinese crackdown on piracy

May 17, 2005

In a United Press International story about China's disregard toward intellectual property rights, Professor Daniel C.K. Chow said that counterfeiting in China is considered by many to be the most serious counterfeiting problem in world history.



Sniffing Out Fakes

September 13, 2004

In U.S. New & World Report, Professor Daniel C.K. Chow noted that if you are a brand owner, you can’t fight counterfeiting without hiring private investigators or having in-house counterfeit investigators.



Commercial Piracy

August 11, 2004

On The Dolans Unscripted, CNNfn, Professor Daniel C.K. Chow discussed commercial piracy, particularly related to goods coming into the U.S. from China.



The World's Greatest Fakes

August 10, 2004

Professor Daniel C.K. Chow was featured on CBS' 60 Minutes about counterfeiting in China. He said "We have never seen a problem of this size and magnitude in world history. There's more counterfeiting going on in China now than we've ever seen anywhere." (This was rebroadcast from January 28, 2004.)