Faculty in the News

Ohio State law professors are sought out for their expertise by a number of news media outlets and blogs with large audiences. Topics range from the death penalty to voter ID laws to artificial insemination – and our faculty members’ quotes and analysis can be found everywhere from small-town and national newspapers to radio broadcasts to cable news programs. The following is a selection of media coverage for Moritz College of Law faculty.

To request an interview, media should click here for more information.

2015 Media Hits

A year after Congress voted to end war on medical pot, raids continue in California

December 29, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Doug Berman was quoted in a Los Angeles Times article on raids on medical pot happening in California:

“I’ve seen no evidence the department is going after anybody doing recreational sales in Washington or Colorado,” said Douglas Berman, a law professor at Ohio State University. “Whatever the law is in a given state, prosecutors have decided it is not worth their time or energy to go after folks who are in compliance with it.”

But until California clarifies its law – either through an initiative or the new measures Brown signed this year – prosecutors will be reluctant to look to cities like Oakland for guidance on what pot businesses should and should not be permitted to do.

"They worry that the minute they show deference to some city officials in Oakland, someone will come out of the woodwork in Detroit who says, 'I have a city councilman who says you should leave me alone,'" Berman said. “The feds are concerned not only with how these rules play out in this case, but the next case and the next case.”
 


A year after Congress voted to end war on medical pot, raids continue in California

December 29, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Doug Berman was quoted in a Los Angeles Times article on how ambiguity in state and federal marijuana laws is leading to continued federal raids on medical marijuana facilities in California.

“I’ve seen no evidence the department is going after anybody doing recreational sales in Washington or Colorado,” said Douglas Berman, a law professor at Ohio State University. “Whatever the law is in a given state, prosecutors have decided it is not worth their time or energy to go after folks who are in compliance with it.”

But until California clarifies its law – either through an initiative or the new measures Brown signed this year – prosecutors will be reluctant to look to cities like Oakland for guidance on what pot businesses should and should not be permitted to do.

"They worry that the minute they show deference to some city officials in Oakland, someone will come out of the woodwork in Detroit who says, 'I have a city councilman who says you should leave me alone,'" Berman said. “The feds are concerned not only with how these rules play out in this case, but the next case and the next case.”


Ohio Lawmakers Calling For Change To State's Grand Jury Process

December 29, 2015

Featured Expert: Ric Simmons

Professor Ric Simmons was featured in a 10tv News segment after a Cleveland grand jury announced the police officers involved in the shooting death of Tamir Rice would not be indicted.

"Their job is to decide whether or not probable cause exists to indict a case, to bring formal charges in a case,” said Simmons. “The grand jury operates in secrecy. It's essentially run by the prosecutor. The prosecutor presents the case to the grand jury, there is usually no defense attorney present, and there is no judge present.  There's just the prosecutor, the witness, a court reporter, and the grand jury.  The prosecutor presents evidence, and then the grand jury decide whether or not to indict the case."

The grand jury doesn't determine guilt or innocence - just whether a case deserves to go on to trial.

"It's usually seen as a pretty easy step for a prosecutor to get past. In other words, if a prosecutor wants to indict a case, he or she can almost always get that indictment. 99% of the time they get the indictment they want,” Simmons said.

He says the reverse is also true.  “If a prosecutor doesn't want to indict the case, the prosecutor could easily not have an indictment happen.” 


Why Philanthropy Actually Hurts Rather Than Helps Some of the World’s Worst Problems

December 28, 2015

Featured Expert: Garry W. Jenkins

Professor Garry Jenkins' work was mentioned in an article in In These Times featuring a question and answer with Linsey McGoey author of No Such Thing As A Free Gift: The Gates Foundation and the Price of Philanthropy . In answering the question "In the book, you document how philanthrocapitalism is seeking to make both charities and public sector institutions run more like corporations, both in structure (with the seeding of for-profit “social enterprises”) and operation (as in the case of teacher evaluation reform). What is gained and lost in this approach?" McGoey said:

"It’s very obvious there’s been a considerable shift in how donors, particularly at large foundations, understand and measure their own impact. Garry Jenkins, a law professor at Ohio State, has done important work here, showing how large foundations such as the Gates Foundation increasingly refuse to accept ”open-door” proposals from smaller non-profits: returning again and again to proven recipients. This tendency is undermining genuine competition."


Posting bond a reality of justice system

December 28, 2015

Featured Expert: Ric Simmons

Professor Ric Simmons was quoted in a Canton Repository article discussing what it would cost - economically and constitutionally - if bail was not an option for any defendants charged with felonies or misdemeanor domestic violence. The debate was sparked after a defendant who was out on bail allegedly killed his ex-wife.

“My first thought is very strongly, it’s not practical at all,” said Ric Simmons, law professor at Ohio State University’s Moritz College of Law. The cost “would be astronomical” and “constitutionally, that wouldn’t fly.”


US Can Preserve Internet Free Speech Against Fears of Terrorism

December 28, 2015

Featured Expert: John B. Quigley

Professor John Quigley was quoted in a Sputnik News article about balancing free speech rights with the use of the internet to recruit would-be terrorists.

Professor Emeritus of International Law at Ohio State University, John Quigley agreed that the US political and legal systems were tilting too far in the direction of repression and endangering the practice of free speech.

"I do not think it appropriate for the government to try to suppress ideas," Quigley insisted. "So long as speech falls short of presenting a ‘clear and present danger,’ it should be tolerated, even if the ideas conveyed might lead some persons to engage in unlawful acts."




 


Tamir Rice’s Family Clashes With Prosecutor Over Police Killing

December 24, 2015

Featured Expert: Ric Simmons

Professor Ric Simmons was quoted in an article that ran in The New York Times and Columbus Dispatch article on Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Tim's McGinty's decision to release some investigative reports from the grand jury investigation of the shooting of Tamir Rice in Cleveland.

Ric Simmons, a law professor at Ohio State University, said it seemed prosecutors might be trying to steer jurors toward no indictments.

 


Why Are the Terms of Service Agreements We Never Read in All Caps?

December 23, 2015

Featured Expert: Mary Beth Beazley

Professor Mary Beth Beazley was quoted in a Slate.com story on the use of all caps in certain types of service agreements. A 2014 paper about conspicuous type by Mary Beth Beazley of Ohio State University's Moritz College of Law explains:
 

Sellers write disclaimers. Of course, they have no reason to write and present them in a way that is easy to understand, and every reason to write and present them in a way that discourages readers from looking closely at them. They are trying to increase profit and limit potential liability in every way they can. Sellers do not write disclaimers because they want buyers to know things. They write them so they can say to the buyer, "I told you so."

Why Are the Terms of Service Agreements We Never Read in All Caps?

December 23, 2015

Featured Expert: Mary Beth Beazley

Professor Mary Beth Beazley was quoted in a Slate.com story on the use of all caps in certain types of service agreements. A 2014 paper about conspicuous type by Mary Beth Beazley of Ohio State University's Moritz College of Law explains:
 

Sellers write disclaimers. Of course, they have no reason to write and present them in a way that is easy to understand, and every reason to write and present them in a way that discourages readers from looking closely at them. They are trying to increase profit and limit potential liability in every way they can. Sellers do not write disclaimers because they want buyers to know things. They write them so they can say to the buyer, "I told you so."

Applications rebound at Ohio State's law school, drop again at Capital

December 21, 2015

Featured Expert: Alan C. Michaels

Dean Alan C. Michaels was quoted in a Columbus Business First article about the recent rise in applications at Moritz.

Moritz Law Dean Alan Michaels said he’s “pleased with our increase, even as applications declined again nationally and regionally,” including a 5 percent decline in nationwide enrollment.


AEP guarding the grid against online attacks

December 21, 2015

Featured Expert: Dakota S. Rudesill

Professor Dakota Rudesill was quoted in a Columbus Dispatch article about cyber attacks on the nation's power grid.

“The public record indicates that we’re not talking about dozens of cyberattacks on the United States on a daily basis; we’re talking about hundreds of thousands,” said Dakota Rudesill, an Ohio State University law professor who previously worked as an adviser on intelligence issues for Congress and the executive branch.

“A lot of them come from state actors, and the big state actors, other than the United States, are the Russian government, Chinese, and the Iranians are getting pretty sophisticated.”

“Shutting down the power grid or blowing up power plants could have catastrophic consequences for the economy,” Rudesill said.


Wisconsin city with contaminated water wants to tap into Lake Michigan supply

December 18, 2015

Featured Expert: Cinnamon Carlarne

Professor Cinnamon Carlarne was quoted in a Columbus Dispatch article the lengthy process a municipality must go through to be granted permission to use the Great Lakes for water supply. All of the surrounding states must approve the action, taking into account the impact on all of the lakes as well as setting precedent for future requests.

“This is going to be especially true with climate change, because even though Ohio and the Great Lakes states tend to be water-rich, it’s not always going to be like that,” said Cinnamon Carlarne, an environmental-law professor at Ohio State University.

“This is a time when we have to think really, really carefully about managing our water, because it’s going to become an increasingly valuable resource.”


Window for an independent Trump bid is wide open

December 17, 2015

Featured Expert: Daniel P. Tokaji

Professor Dan Tokaji was quoted in a Politico article about the possibility of Donald Trump running as an independent. At this week’s GOP debate, Trump said that he’s no longer considering a third-party run. But his sporadic, strategic flirtation with an independent campaign has Republicans taking their poll leader’s commitment with a grain of salt.

But should he stumble in the Republican primaries and change his mind, Trump’s path to a nationally viable independent presidential bid faces three logistical obstacles: the cost of ballot access, early ballot access deadlines and “sore loser” laws in some states that are designed to prevent candidates who lose primaries from running outside their parties in general elections.

Though any Trump bid could face obstacles erected by state elections officials, they are surmountable, according to experts.

Already, in Ohio — where a Trump independent bid could sink the GOP’s chances at the presidency — the Republican secretary of state Jon Husted said on Monday that Trump would be ineligible to appear on the ballot as an independent because it was too late for him to credibly leave the party. “There is no way he could disaffiliate himself from the Republican Party in good faith for this election,” said Josh Eck, a Husted spokesman.

Experts have greeted Husted’s position with skepticism. “Good luck with that argument,” said Dan Tokaji, a law professor at The Ohio State University who specializes in elections. He said the issues that motivate independent presidential bids often don’t arise until deep into the primary calendar and that courts are very unlikely to uphold any restriction imposed this early in the cycle. Tokaji added that Ohio officials would be on firmer ground if Trump participates in Ohio’s March 15 primary before attempting to make the ballot as an independent. “There, at least, they would have a straight-faced argument to make,” he said.







 

 


 


Attorneys Ask DOJ to Probe Cleveland Police Shooting of Boy

December 15, 2015

Featured Expert: Ric Simmons

Professor Ric Simmons was quoted in an ABC News story on a possible DOJ investigation into the shooting of Cleveland teen Tamir Rice.

Ric Simmons of the Moritz College of Law at Ohio State University said the treatment of the officers was unusual, but not illegal. Simmons added that if federal prosecutors were to pursue a criminal case, they would have to prove that Loehmann and Garmback intended to violate Tamir's civil rights.

Simmons agreed with the family's attorneys that a special prosecutor should be appointed.

"I always thought that was an appropriate thing to do in the case because there's a strong allegation and some suspicion that prosecutors and police have been working too closely together," Simmons said.


Donald Trump can't run as an independent in Ohio, secretary of state's office says

December 15, 2015

Featured Expert: Daniel P. Tokaji

Professor Dan Tokaji was quoted in a Cleveland Plain Dealer article on whether Donald Trump could still run as an independent candidate in Ohio after he filed to run as a Republican presidential candidate in December. Secretary of State Jon Husted has stated the filing bars Trump from running as an independent under Ohio law.

However, Dan Tokaji, an Ohio State University law professor specializing in election law, said Husted's interpretation of the law is contradicted by a 1983 U.S. Supreme Court ruling on a case from Ohio.

In that case, Republican-turned-independent presidential candidate John Anderson was blocked from the 1980 Ohio general election ballot because he missed a statutory deadline to register as an independent candidate. The Supreme Court ruled 5-4 that Ohio's early filing deadline was unconstitutional.

Husted's office would keep Trump from running as an independent for a slightly different reason, "but it seems to me it's the same principle" as the Anderson case, Tokaji said. 


A century ago, a popular Missouri newspaper demonized a religious minority: Catholics

December 15, 2015

Featured Expert: Sharon L. Davies

Professor Sharon Davies was quoted in a Los Angeles Times article about the prevalence of an anti-Catholic newspaper based in southwest Missouri in 1915 that had one of the largest readerships in the country at the time. Hatred had become big business in southwestern Missouri, and its name was the Menace, a weekly anti-Catholic newspaper whose headlines screamed to readers around the nation about predatory priests, women enslaved in convents and a dangerous Roman Catholic plot to take over America.

Today, there are calls for federal surveillance of mosques in the name of preventing terrorist attacks; a century ago, it was state laws that allowed the warrantless search of convents and churches in search of supposedly trapped women and purported secret Catholic weapons caches.

"I see huge parallels," said Sharon Davies, executive director of the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity at Ohio State University. "I think we haven't seen anything quite like this since the beginning of the 20th century, when we passed laws that permitted the Catholics to be treated in ways that no other religious group was treated."


Tracie Hunter: Case against her a 'political takedown'

December 13, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Doug Berman was quoted in a Cincinnati Enquirer article about Tracie Hunter, the suspended Hamilton County juvenile court judge who has been convicted of one charge involving mishandling documents and faces eight felony counts. Hunter announced she was running for a new seat on juvenile court.

Douglas Berman, professor at Ohio State University’s Moritz College of Law, said Ohio election rules bar people from running for office if they’re incarcerated or serving a probation sentence. But Hunter’s status isn’t so clear.

She was sentenced last year to six months in jail, but the Ohio Supreme Court suspended the sentence while she pursues an appeal.

“She’s in this in-between state,” Berman said. “This is a very gray area … I think there’s some uncertainty, and part of that uncertainty is that this doesn’t happen very often.”


Tamir Rice grand jury process turns secrecy precedent on its head, but experts say that could pay dividends

December 11, 2015

Featured Expert: Ric Simmons

Professor Ric Simmons was quoted in a Cleveland Plain Dealer article on the grand jury investigations into the shooting of Tamir Rice.

"This is an extraordinary way of conducting a grand jury," said Ric Simmons, a law professor from Ohio State's Moritz College of Law and an expert in criminal law and criminal procedure. "Both the amount of openness and the amount of information given to the grand jury are pretty extraordinary."

"The prosecutor is choosing to cede control, to not make a decision and stand by it, but to leave it with the grand jury," Simmons said.


Washington Policy Confusion Made Iraqi Leaders Despair of US Alliance

December 10, 2015

Featured Expert: John B. Quigley

Professor John Quigley was quoted in a Sputnik News article about the recent call by the Iraqi Parliament's Security and Defense Committee to review or cancel its security pact with the United States.

Iraq would be well within its legal and constitutional rights if it chose to terminate the security alliance with Washington, Ohio State University Moritz College of Law professor John Quigley told Sputnik.


"The [Iraq-US] Strategic Framework Agreement of 2008 contains a provision that allows either party to terminate the agreement by giving one year's notice," Quigley said. "Therefore, if the Iraqi Parliament decides to terminate the agreement, it has every right to do so."


Bonuses and the Reality of Big Law Associate Compensation

December 8, 2015

Featured Expert: Deborah Jones Merritt

Professor Deborah Merritt was quoted in an American Lawyer article on large end-of-the-year bonuses many law firms are paying associates this year. While average salaries and bonuses continue to rise, they have not kept pace with the rising costs of tuition, and, often therefore, debt carried by associates.

Top associates had it much easier 30 years ago, when many current senior partners were entering the work force. Harvard Law School’s annual tuition in the mid-1980s was about $10,000, while a starting salary at Cravath was $53,000, according to Ohio State University Moritz College of Law professor Deborah Merritt.

Merritt said there’s no good way to determine who’s to blame for the rising cost of tuition.

“It’s a chicken-and-egg problem, because it’s the high salaries that are out there that allow the law schools to charge as much as they do,” she said.
 


Tobacco free policy aims to influence campus culture

December 7, 2015

Featured Expert: Micah Berman

Professor Micah Berman was quoted in a Lantern article on the two-year anniversary of Ohio State's campus-wide, all inclusive tobacco ban and its addition to the Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights list of tobacco-free universities.

Micah Berman, an assistant professor at the College of Public Health who also holds a joint appointment with the Moritz College of Law, said that OSU’s addition to the list is significant because it sets an example for smaller schools to follow suit and make their campuses tobacco-free.

“Ohio State was not the trailblazer,” Berman said. “That being said, Ohio State (being added to the list) was big news because of how big (the school is).”

Berman said that because of OSU’s admission to the ANR’s list, it has continued a chain reaction of other Big Ten schools starting the process of becoming tobacco-free.


Fewer donors give more to Kasich

December 7, 2015

Featured Expert: Daniel P. Tokaji

Professor Dan Tokaji was quoted in a Cincinnati Enquirer article about Republican Presidential Candidate John Kasich raising the most money of any presidential candidate in Ohio, even though many other candidates had more donors.

"It's not at all surprising that a candidate would raise the most money from his home state, where his base lies," said Dan Tokaji, an Ohio State University law professor and elections expert.


Justices take up meaning of ‘one person, one vote’

December 4, 2015

Featured Expert: Daniel P. Tokaji

Professor Dan Tokaji was quoted in an Associated Press article about the Supreme Court case Evenwel v. Abbott, which is challenging the way electoral districts are drawn in Texas. Rather than basing the maps on total population, including non-citizens and children who aren’t old enough to vote, states must count only people who are eligible to vote, the challengers say. They argue that change is needed to carry out the principle of one person, one vote. In general, areas with large minority or immigrant populations have more non-citizens and children.

The difference may be explained in terms of red and blue, said Ohio State University law professor Dan Tokaji.

“Blue states will surely continue to draw districts based on total population, but we can expect red states to choose a narrower metric, one that diminishes the voting strength of minority communities and others with large non-voting populations,” Tokaji said.

While redistricting typically takes place just after the census, some states might not wait for the 2020 census and instead try to draw new maps that would be in place until the next census, he said.


U.S. Supreme Court grants Barton case 2-week extension

December 4, 2015

Featured Expert: David A. Goldberger

Professor David Goldberger was quoted in a Dayton Daily News article about the Supreme Court possibly taking up the appeal of Springboro Police Lt. Jim Barton, who was convicted of hiring those responsible for raping and murdering his wife in a botched burglary. The Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals had previously ordered that Barton be released or retried because of evidence was withheld and the testimony of a key witness was questionable. The Ohio Attorney General is appealing to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Experts surveyed about the prospects of the high court intervening in the case were divided.

“There’s a better than even chance that they are going to overturn the lower-court decision, based on their previous performance in this area,” David Goldberger, a law professor emeritus at The Ohio State University, said Friday.

The Ohio Attorney General’s appeal claims the federal appeals court was wrong to call for Barton’s release or retrial because state appeals courts had already reviewed the conviction in 2004 by a jury in Warren County Common Pleas Court.

In past appeals on this issue, Goldberger said the high court has deferred to the state courts in accordance with the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act, passed by Congress in 1996 in response to concerns about death penalty cases being overturned in federal courts.

“The conservative majority loves the statute and applies it very liberally,” Goldberger said. “I would be delighted to be wrong.”


The government is abusing mandatory minimums: How law enforcement is ruining a generation of Americans

December 3, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Doug Berman was mentioned in a Salon article about the sentencing of Alton Mills, who received a life sentence in 1994 for being a crack courier because he had two priors for possession. Mills did not cooperate, or snitch, with police and, therefore, received the maximum sentence, plus a enhancement for the priors. The use of enhancement varies greatly from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.

“Despite these directives, there is mounting evidence that at least some U.S. Attorneys still consider it appropriate to routinely threaten to file § 851 enhancements if defendants exercise their right to go to trial,” wrote Stith and two other legal scholars, Douglas Berman and Mark Osler, in a November 9 letter to Attorney General Loretta Lynch.

 


Investors Embrace Ethics

December 3, 2015

Featured Expert: Paul Rose

Professor Paul Rose's work on the annual review public fund investment policies was mentioned in an article on Top 1000 Funds. Rose has conducted the survey for the past two years. The story said:

According to the Public Fund Investment Policies 2015 annual review produced by the Ohio State University Moritz College of Law, a code of ethics helps to ensure that investments are made in accordance with the fund’s investment policies and regulations.


Where's death penalty in push for criminal justice overhaul?

November 26, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Doug Berman was quoted in an Associated Press article, which also ran in The New York Times,  on the lack of discussion about repealing the death penalty in recent criminal justice reform conversations. In recent interviews, President Obama has hinted that his support of the death penalty may be waning.

White House officials caution that any presidential statement disputing the effectiveness or constitutionality of the death penalty would have legal consequences.

For example, would the administration then commute the sentences of the 62 people currently on federal death row to life in prison?

Every lawyer representing a death row inmate would make that case in an appeal, said Douglas Berman, criminal law professor at Ohio State University's Moritz College of Law. Among those inmates: Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, convicted of murder in the Boston Marathon bombing.

"There's not been a president who in the modern use of the federal death penalty has indicated a disaffinity for it," Berman said. "And if this one were to say, 'I don't think it's something we ought to be doing,' that's a policy statement and personal statement, but it is also one that indisputably would be put in the legal papers and would require courts to grapple with its significance."


ANALYSIS: Obama and Hollande’s flowery language masks weak strategy

November 25, 2015

Featured Expert: John B. Quigley

Professor John Quigley was quoted in an article in the Middle East Eye about the meeting between President Obama and French President Francois Hollande after the terrorists attacks in Paris.

According to John Quigley, a law professor at Ohio State University, Hollande wants to strengthen the fight against IS by boosting cooperation between the West and Russia and Iran, despite their contrasting agendas.

“After the Paris attack, France wants to go directly at IS, even at the cost of leaving the Syrian government in power,” Quigley told MEE.

“Added to this, Putin makes the compelling case that Syria is better off with Assad in power, rather than without. Because if Assad goes, nobody knows exactly what will happen, and we could very well have another Libya or Iraq.”

France says that for closer coordination with Russia to occur, Moscow must stop Assad from bombing civilians, focus its strikes solely on IS and other hardliners and help find a political solution without Assad.


New Albany bans under-21 tobacco sales

November 24, 2015

Featured Expert: Micah Berman

Professor Micah Berman was mentioned in a New Albany News story about the city's recent decision to raise the age of tobacco sales from 18 to 21.  City officials worked with Berman in drafting the legislation.


California death penalty: legal obstacle to executions removed

November 23, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Doug Berman was quoted in a San Jose Mercury News article about the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit decision to overturn a lower court's ruling that the California death penalty was unconstitutional because of the decades-long delays in handling inmates' appeals.

Douglas Berman, an Ohio State University law professor who follows national death penalty issues, predicted on his Sentencing Law and Policy blog that lawyers for death row inmates would press the issue further in the 9th Circuit and Supreme Court, a move that he added would likely further stall attempts to set execution dates in California.


Pro/Con: Should Obama move decisively to annihilate ISIS?

November 20, 2015

Featured Expert: John B. Quigley

Professor John Quigley wrote an opinion editorial that appeared in newspapers across the nation on possible U.S. responses to the ISIS Paris terrorist attacks. Quigley argued for a non-military response.

"Use of force has gotten us into the fix in which we now find ourselves. Our response to the attacks we suffered on 9/11 was military. Our aim in invading Afghanistan in 2001 was to stop terrorism, but we seem only to have spawned more. We did limit al-Qaeda’s ability to operate in Afghanistan, but they moved elsewhere, and the anger we generated may have brought even more down on us. Our invasion of Iraq in 2003 replaced a Sunni-led government with a Shia-led government that then carried out a vendetta against the Sunni population of Iraq," Quigley wrote.


Woman Loses Court Challenge Over Frozen Embryos

November 19, 2015

Featured Expert: Efthimios Parasidis

Professor Efthimios Parasidis was quoted in a 10TV News story on a divorcing couple's debate over what to do with unused frozen embryos.

The ex-wife agreed that if they ever got divorced she would have the embryos destroyed but when she changed her mind, her ex-husband sued. A judge sided with him.

"It's almost impossible not to feel for this women in this case", Ohio State Associate Law Professor Efthimios Parasidis said. 

He agrees with the judge, but this medical ethicist says the case also delves into a gray area of the law: Should embryos be treated like property like in a per-nuptial agreement?

"Courts aren't going to say that an embryo is property, but there also not going to say that the embryo is a person because once they say it's a person then an entirely new set of rules comes into the picture," he said.


House hearing sheds light on UAS tech, economic impacts

November 19, 2015

Featured Expert: Margot Kaminski

Professor Margot Kaminski was mentioned in a UAS Magazine article on a U.S. House of Representatives hearing on small unmanned aircraft, or drones. She testified at the hearing.


The Black Lives Matter Movement Is About To Jump Into The 2016 Marijuana Battle

November 18, 2015

Professor Michelle Alexander was quoted in a BuzzFeed News article about a recent alliance between marijuana legalization advocates and the Black Lives Matter movement, in part because advocates want to ensure people of color have an opportunity to be involved in the new legalized marijuana economy.

“In many ways the imagery doesn’t sit right,” said Michelle Alexander, an associate professor of law at Ohio State University and author of The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, in a conversation with the Drug Policy Alliance’s asha bandele last March.

“Here are white men poised to run big marijuana businesses, dreaming of cashing in big—big money, big businesses selling weed — after 40 years of impoverished black kids getting prison time for selling weed, and their families and futures destroyed,” Alexander continued. “Now, white men are planning to get rich doing precisely the same thing?”


OSU rally ends with statement signed by administrators

November 18, 2015

Featured Expert: Sharon L. Davies

Professor Sharon Davies was mentioned in a Toledo Blade article about a student rally held on campus in support of students protesting racism at the University of Missouri. Davies is the university's chief diversity officer.


Ohio State Aims To Improve Diversity On Campus

November 17, 2015

Featured Expert: Sharon L. Davies

Professor Sharon Davies was quoted in a WOSU Public Radio story on a protest on campus that was fueled by recent events at the University of Missouri.

At Hale Hall, the university’s Black Cultural Center, Sharon Davies is in her fourth month as OSU’s chief diversity officer.

“We just haven’t yet succeeded in enrolling a critical mass of African American students," Davies said. 

Davies said diversity improves education, and breaks stereotypes.

“The perception that African Americans are good at some things and not others, are great athletes, but maybe not a future neurosurgeon, those are wrong," she said. "And those are the kinds of things that are created when we see more African American students here in certain roles and not enough in our seats in law school, in medical school, in the Fisher College of Business.”

While better schools and lower tuition could help more African American students go to college, Davies said enrollment is key.  The more black students on campus, the more African American students will want to come.

“We don’t reach critical mass until we admit more students from underrepresented minority groups to Ohio State,"she said. "So I don’t let myself off the hook for that. That’s going to be an important part of my job.”

Davies said the spotlight students are shining on the lack of the diversity across college campuses has renewed the push for OSU to do better. 


Ohio State sit-in yields joint statement

November 17, 2015

Featured Expert: Sharon L. Davies

Professor Sharon Davies, who also serves as the university's chief diversity officer, was quoted in a Columbus Dispatch article that covered a rally against racism on campus. The rally was organized by the student group OSU2Mizzou.  Davies marched with the students and signed released statement, which said in part:

“Ohio State aims to be a leader in creating a campus that is safe and welcoming for all members of our community. The administration understands that, despite our efforts to cultivate a just and equitable environment, students, faculty, and staff still experience racism. The stories echoed across the country underscore the urgency for change from the University of Missouri to our own campus.

“Students have immense power to change the world. Together, we are committed to moving forward in the fight for justice with the help of all concerned Buckeyes.”

 

 


When will marijuana legalization become an issue for Congress?

November 10, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Doug Berman was quoted in a Mashable article about what it would take for Congress to take up marijuana reform on a national level. Currently, reforms have been on the state level, causing a conflict with federal drug laws.

"Folks who are really dramatic supporters of reform want recreational reform, not just medical reform," said Doug Berman, a criminal law professor at Ohio State University. "That's where the interesting rubber hits the road."


Ohio Voters Refuse to Legalize Marijuana - OSU Law Prof. Explains

November 10, 2015

Featured Expert: Daniel P. Tokaji

Professor Dan Tokaji was quoted in a Legal Broadcast Network article on why marijuana legalization failed in Ohio.

Prof. Tokaji says that the biggest problem with the issue was “bad ballot language.” The language on the ballot described the issue as “granting a monopoly for the commercial production and sale of marijuana for recreational and medicinal purposes.” Prof. Tokaji says that the opponents of the issue got the ballot language they wanted. With that description, he opines, the “yes on 3” supporters had no chance of winning no matter how many millions of dollars they spent urging passage of the issue.


Federal judge slaps Justice Department for limits on medical marijuana

November 5, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Doug Berman was quoted in a Los Angeles Times article on a district court opinion that challenged the Justice Department’s narrow interpretation of part of a law passed by Congress last year that bars the department from spending any money to prevent a state from implementing its medical marijuana laws.

California law on medical marijuana “is a bloody mess,” said Douglas Berman, a law professor at Ohio State University who follows marijuana issues.


Chris Walker: How a bill becomes a law? Federal agencies play a role, too

November 5, 2015

Featured Expert: Christopher J. Walker

Professor Chris Walker was featured in a Federal News Radio segment on the role federal agencies play in law making. Walker recently wrote a report to the Administrative Conference of the United States on the subject.


A bipartisan failure in talking about prisons and the ‘war on drugs’

November 5, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Doug Berman was quoted in a Washington Post about the wide range of questionable statements related to marijuana and criminal justice made by politicians on both sides of the aisle.

“It’s not a sound bite story,” said Douglas A. Berman, an Ohio State University law professor. “The more extreme and specific a sound bite is, the more likely it is to be wrong.”


What Ohio's rejection of marijuana legalization tells us about direct democracy

November 4, 2015

Featured Expert: Daniel P. Tokaji

Professor Dan Tokaji was quoted in a Brookings Institute article on why marijuana legalization failed in Ohio.

Because voters have an instinctive dislike of monopolies, Ohio State law professor Daniel Tokaji argued that they were essentially faced with two questions on Issue 2 and Issue 3 respectively: “Do you like puppies?” and “Do you hate puppies?” At an event last Friday, he very confidently predicted that, given these framings, Issue 2 would pass while Issue 3 would fail, and he was correct.


Obama commutes dozens of sentences, but remains the ‘Scrooge’ of pardons

July 13, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Doug Berman was quoted in a Yahoo! news article about Obama commuting dozens of sentences, but offering few pardons.

“He’s been unusually stingy — he’s a clemency Grinch,” Berman said.


The Illusion of a Liberal Supreme Court

July 9, 2015

Featured Expert: Gregory A. Caldeira

Professor Gregory A. Caldeira's 2009 journal article “Measuring Policy Content on the U.S. Supreme Court,” was cited in an opinion piece that appeared in The New York Times this month discussing the illusion of a liberal supreme court.


Solving the Problem of Too Little Crime

July 1, 2015

Professor Michelle Alexander was cited in a Commentary Magazine article on politics, public safety, and crime.

"According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, 2,805 black males over the age of 18, out of every 100,000 in the national population, were imprisoned in a federal or state facility in 2013. Measured the same way, comparable numbers for Hispanic and non-Hispanic white males were 1,134 and 466, respectively. Such disparities are the basis of Ohio State law professor Michelle Alexander’s argument that in 'an era of colorblindness,' we have come to “use our criminal-justice system to associate criminality with people of color and then engage in the prejudiced practices we supposedly left behind.”
 


Demands at home should be priority

July 1, 2015

Featured Expert: John B. Quigley

Professor John B. Quigley wrote an op-ed that was published in Philly.com. In the lead, he wrote:

"More spending on the military is not what this country  needs."

U.S. Supreme Court Redistricting, Death Penalty Decisions Reverberate in California

June 30, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Douglas A. Berman was quoted in an article on AllGov California discussing the U.S. Supreme Court's rulings in a number of recent cases, including one in which they upheld Oklahoma's right to execute death row prisoners using a controversial combination of lethal injection drugs.

 “(It is) a pretty strong green light for California to go forward with whatever lethal injection protocol fits their own regulations and interests,” Berman said.


Where Do the Death Penalty Abolitionists Go From Here?

June 30, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Douglas A. Berman was quoted in a Bloomberg Business article on the U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruing in Glossip v. Gross, where the court upheld Oklahoma's use of the sedative midazolam in lethal injections.

"Seven of the nine standing Supreme Court justices—excluding Justices Breyer and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who signed on to his dissent—'apparently do not question the death penalty's essential constitutionality,'" Berman said.  


Editorial: Supreme Court upholds use of lethal injection drug

June 30, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Douglas A. Berman was mentioned in an editorial piece in The Independent discussing U.S. Supreme Court’s 5-4 decision to upholding the state of Oklahoma's use of the lethal injection drug midazolam.

 


Arkansas governor tells state to find execution drug supply

June 30, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Douglas A. Berman was quoted in an article on the Rapid News Network discussing the effect a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling that upheld Oklahoma's use of the sedative midazolam in lethal injections, could have on California.

"(It is) a pretty strong green light for California to go forward with whatever lethal injection protocol fits their own regulations and interests," Berman said.


U.S. Supreme Court's death-penalty ruling could impede challenges to Ohio's execution drugs

June 30, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Doug Berman was quoted in a Cleveland.com story about the U.S. Supreme Court's death-penalty ruling.

"Ohio certainly should feel emboldened, if not vindicated, to try to move forward with whatever execution method it thinks makes the most sense," Berman said.


Supreme Court Ruling Won’t Stop Search for Execution Drugs

June 29, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Douglas A. Berman was quoted in an article for Time on the search for more-effective lethal-injection drugs and execution methods following the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling that Oklahoma’s use of midazolam during lethal injections did not violate the Eighth Amendment’s ban on cruel and unusual punishment.

“I think this ruling will make states feel a little more comfortable moving forward with different drugs and different methods,” Berman said. "But states will still have their own challenges securing the drug, even though the constitutional issue is out of the way.”


Positions Harden on High Court over Capital Punishment

June 29, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Douglas A. Berman was quoted in an article in the National Law Journal discussing the U.S. Supreme Court's 5-4 decision in Glossip v. Gross to uphold Oklahoma's use of the sedative midazolam in lethal injections.


California death penalty: High court ruling could resume executions

June 29, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Douglas A. Berman was quoted in an article that ran in the San Jose Mercury News, and subsequently appeared on other news sites including the Daily Democrat, on the U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruing in Glossip v. Gross, where the court upheld Oklahoma's use of the sedative midazolam in lethal injections.

"(It is) a pretty strong green light for California to go forward with whatever lethal injection protocol fits their own regulations and interests," Berman said.


U.S. ruling could clear path to more executions at San Quentin

June 29, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Douglas A. Berman was quoted in an article that appeared in the Marin Independent Journal on what the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to uphold Oklahoma's use of the sedative midazolam in lethal injections, could mean for California.

“(It is) a pretty strong green light for California to go forward with whatever lethal injection protocol fits their own regulations and interests,” Berman said.


California death penalty: High court ruling could resume executions

June 29, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Doug Berman was quoted in a San Jose Mercury News article on California's death penalty.

"(It is) a pretty strong green light for California to go forward with whatever lethal injection protocol fits their own regulations and interests," said Douglas Berman, an Ohio State University law professor and author of the Sentencing Law and Policy blog.


Supreme Court upholds lethal injection procedure

June 29, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Douglas Berman was quoted in a Washington Post article on the U.S. Supreme Court's upholding of lethal injection procedures.

"Douglas Berman, a law professor at Ohio State University and an expert on criminal sentencing, said the decision was a 'big win' for states trying to carry out executions. (A dwindling number of states carry out the death penalty.)

And he found it significant that only two justices called for another look at the constitutionality of the death penalty. 'Seven current justices apparently do not question the death penalty’s essential constitutionality, including the five youngest justices,' Berman said in a statement. That “suggests to me that abolitionists still have a lot more work to do.”
 


Supreme Court upholds lethal injection procedure

June 29, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Douglas A. Berman was quoted in a Washington Post article on the Supreme Court's decision in Glossip v. Gross to turn aside claims by Oklahoma death-row inmates that a drug to be used in their executions would lead to an unconstitutional level of suffering. Berman said the decision was a “big win” for states trying to carry out executions. He also noted he found it significant that only two justices called for another look at the constitutionality of the death penalty.

"Seven current justices apparently do not question the death penalty’s essential constitutionality, including the five youngest justices,” Berman said in a statement. That “suggests to me that abolitionists still have a lot more work to do.”


U.S. Supreme Court's death-penalty ruling could impede challenges to Ohio's execution drugs

June 29, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Douglas A. Berman was quoted in a Cleveland Plain Dealer article on the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to uphold a controversial execution drug, which may make it harder to challenge Ohio's new lethal-injection protocol. The court's ruling indicates that judges will now allow use of new lethal-injection drugs so long as the state proves it's trying its best to avoid cruel and unusual punishment, Berman said.

"Ohio certainly should feel emboldened, if not vindicated, to try to move forward with whatever execution method it thinks makes the most sense," Berman said.


Supreme Court upholds use of controversial lethal injection drug

June 29, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Douglas A. Berman was quoted in an article on Vox about the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling to uphold the use of midazolam, a controversial lethal injection drug.

"Oklahoma had this botched experience, spent time studying what went wrong, and then said, 'Well, we can't find anything that clearly showed it went wrong, so we're just going to keep doing it this way,'" Berman said. "That put off enough of the justices that they've wanted to really scrutinize what Oklahoma is doing."


California officials praise Supreme Court ruling on independent redistricting commissions

June 29, 2015

Featured Expert: Edward B. Foley

 

Professor Ned Foley was quoted in a Los Angeles Times article on the Supreme Court's ruling on independent redistricting commissions.

The article states: "In Ohio, for example, a proposal on the ballot this year would overhaul how state legislative districts are drawn. According to Ohio State University professor Edward Foley, some involved in the process were hesitant to act on a congressional redistricting reform proposal while the case was undecided.

'It was seen as a nonstarter,' Foley said. Now the Supreme Court has “given a green light” to overhaul congressional redistricting, he added."


Supreme Court blocks power plant rules that Indiana opposed

June 29, 2015

Featured Expert: Cinnamon Carlarne

Professor Cinnamon Carlarne, an expert on environmental and energy law, was quoted in an Indy Star story on The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to block power plant rules that Indiana opposed.

"In considering the level of regulation, EPA has already quantified both the costs of regulation and the numerous direct and co-benefits of regulation and these benefits support the regulations that EPA has proposed," said Carlarne. "EPA  may  have lost the first round, but it is likely to win the fight."
 


Gay rights fight shifts to anti-discrimination laws

June 28, 2015

Featured Expert: Ruth Colker

Professor Ruth Colker was quoted in an article in The Dallas Morning News about gay rights activists' fight to obtain federal, state, and local legal protections in employment, housing, commerce, and other arenas. Colker explained that in many states, some local governments have anti-discrimination laws, but they are often weak or poorly enforced.

“Typically, the penalty for violating a city ordinance is more akin to a traffic violation,” she said. “State-level penalties can be much more significant.”


Religious freedoms put at risk, critics say

June 28, 2015

Featured Expert: Daniel P. Tokaji

Professor Dan Tokaji was quoted in an article in The Columbus Dispatch about critics reaction to the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in favor of  marriage equality. While some said they feared it could mean the loss of religious freedom, or even the tax-exempt status of religiously affiliated organizations and churches, Tokaji said  the ruling was concerned solely with discrimination by the government against same-sex couples.

“Discrimination is about government discrimination against gays and lesbians, not about discrimination by private individuals and groups,” Tokaji said. “This is an important milestone for equality for gays and lesbians, but it’s clearly not the end of the road.”

He called fears that the ruling threatens the nonprofit tax status of religious organizations “an enormous overreaction at this stage. The Supreme Court’s ruling doesn’t go there.”


Consumers often sign away option to sue financial companies

June 28, 2015

Featured Expert: Sarah Rudolph Cole

Professor Sarah Cole was quoted in a Columbus Dispatch article on why  consumers are giving up their right to go to court if they have a dispute with a company.

She told the Dispatch that class-action lawsuits often start when a consumer notices, for example, an illegitimate fee that has been added to a credit-card bill.

“Lots of people don’t know about the fee, and they are losing a lot of money,” she said.
 


John Roberts to America: I'm in Charge Here

June 27, 2015

Featured Expert: Christopher J. Walker

Professor Chris Walker's blog post on the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in King v. Burwell, which upheld the government’s regulation interpreting the Affordable Care Act to allow for tax subsidies in healthcare exchanges established by the federal government, was mentioned in an article that appeared in the New Republic.

King v. Burwell—while a critical win for the Obama Administration—is a judicial power grab over the Executive in the modern administrative state," he wrote.


The real reason why the Supreme Court's Obamacare ruling is so important

June 27, 2015

Featured Expert: Christopher J. Walker

Professor Chris Walker was quoted in an article in Business Insider Australia on the importance of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in King v. Burwell to uphold a key provision of the of the Affordable Care Act that allows the federal government to distribute subsidies to help low-income Americans buy health insurance.

“Because the Court has provided its own, definitive interpretation of the ambiguous statute — and held that it will not defer to the agency’s interpretation — a subsequent presidential administration (say, a Republican Administration) cannot reinterpret the statutory provision to prohibit tax subsidies in exchanges established by the Federal Government,” Walker said.


ResponsibleOhio proposes legislation to expunge marijuana offense records

June 25, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Douglas A. Berman was quoted in a Cleveland Plain Dealer article about a new law, drafted by pro-marijuana group ResponsibleOhio, that would allow Ohioans convicted of certain marijuana crimes to expunge their records if  the group's marijuana legalization proposal is approved by voters this fall.

Berman, who helped draft the proposed law, said decriminalization doesn't mean as much in practice. Other charges are often added and many who are arrested lack the money to hire an attorney to argue down charges. The Internet has also made it easier for employers to find past charges, even if  a criminal record doesn't exist.

"If we've decided we want to no longer call this a crime, we should be prepared to erase or be very open to modifying the crime records of anybody who has gotten in trouble with it," Berman said.


Why Tsarnaev may NEVER face the needle: Years of appeals, no federal executions since 2003 and 61 prisoners on death row ahead of him mean Boston bomber could avoid the gurney

June 24, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Douglas A. Berman was quoted in a Daily Mail article on the possibility of  convicted Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev receiving the death penalty. With many of the issues that typically draw criticisms of death penalty sentences, such as inadequate legal counsel and post-conviction exonerations, absent in this case, and the sheer horror of the crime,  Tsarnaev could be the 'perfect test case' for the future of capital punishment, Berman said.

"I think it's 50-50," he said. "This could be the case that people have in mind when they say we reserve the death penalty for the worst of the worst."


Anti-monopoly amendment clears Ohio House panel

June 23, 2015

Featured Expert: Daniel P. Tokaji

Professor Dan Tokaji was cited in a Cleveland Plain Dealer article on the Ohio House Government Accountability and Oversight Committee's decision to approve a constitutional amendment that would prevent monopolies from being written in the state constitution and block ResponsibleOhio's plan to legalize marijuana this fall. He noted the language is still too vague and would allow judges to pick and choose whom the law applies to.

"The proponent of virtually every initiative will claim that it benefits a special interest at the expense of the public interest," Tokaji wrote in testimony submitted to lawmakers.


Some central Ohio clergy are eager to marry gay couples

June 22, 2015

Featured Expert: Daniel P. Tokaji

Professor Dan Tokaji was quoted in a Columbus Dispatch article on same-sex marriage and Ohio clergy after the June 2015 U.S. Supreme Court ruling.

"The Supreme Court case 'is only about whether the government can discriminate, not about whether churches can discriminate,' Tokaji said. 'And churches will be free to discriminate against gays and lesbians as they always have, regardless of how the Supreme Court rules.'" 

 


Kennedy Joins Liberals in Two Rulings Against Law Enforcement Officials

June 22, 2015

Featured Expert: Ric Simmons

Professor Ric Simmons was quoted by the National Law Journal in an article discussing the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in City of Los Angeles v. Patel.


U.S. Supreme Court sides with innkeepers on right to privacy

June 22, 2015

Featured Expert: Ric Simmons

Professor Ric Simmons was quoted in a San Francisco Chronicle article on the U.S. Supreme Court decision that could make it harder for the government to seize private consumer information.

"There are millions of companies that hold our personal information, from insurance companies to Internet service providers,” he said. While consumers themselves have no right to object if a company turns that information over to the government, Simmons said, the ruling makes it clear that the custodian of the information — the owner of a small motel or an Internet giant — can require some type of judicial review.


Some central Ohio clergy are eager to marry gay couples

June 22, 2015

Featured Expert: Daniel P. Tokaji

Professor Daniel Tokaji was quoted in an article that appeared in The Columbus Dispatch regarding the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on marriage equality. Tokaji said even if the court sided with supporters of same-sex marriage, it could not force clergy members to perform same-sex weddings.

"The Supreme Court case 'is only about whether the government can discriminate, not about whether churches can discriminate,'" Tokaji said. "And churches will be free to discriminate against gays and lesbians as they always have, regardless of how the Supreme Court rules.”


Bob Evans might pay out millions in overtime lawsui

June 21, 2015

Featured Expert: L. Camille Hébert

Professor Camille Hebert, an employment-law expert at Ohio State University, was quoted in a Columbus Dispatch article on Bob Evans' overtime lawsuits.

“It’s not a new issue at all,” Hebert said. “Lots and lots (of companies) have been sued because it happens a lot. It’s very case by case.”


Law School Can Lead to Prosecuting Federal Drug Laws

June 18, 2015

Featured Expert: Deborah Jones Merritt

Professor  Deborah Merritt hosted an "I Am the Law" podcast on U.S. News & World Report's website, about the experience of working in the criminal justice system.


Marijuana effort in Ohio to face challenge from state lawmakers

June 16, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Douglas A. Berman was quoted in an article that appeared in the Dayton Daily News about state lawmakers taking steps to block groups from installing private property rights in the Ohio Constitution, like the casino owners did and advocates for legalizing marijuana want to do this fall. If approved by the voters in November, the amendment would block a marijuana legalization plan, which is also expected to be on the ballot — even if voters say yes to legal marijuana.

Berman said he believes if both initiatives pass there will be lots of litigation over which would take effect and whether making it more difficult for certain groups to propose a constitutional amendment would be upheld by the courts.

“Yes, we’re going to get litigation. Yes, we’re going to get confusion. Yes, we’re going to get challenges of all sorts. But these are important conversations to be having — both about the substance of should we reform our marijuana laws at all and what is arguably the best way to go about doing that?” Berman said. “And good, bad or indifferent, that’s the conversation we are all now having. Again, what I would say is it’s a shame the Legislature wasn’t having this conversation a year ago because then it could be an orderly, sensible statutory conversation, rather than what has now become a seemingly disorderly, noisy, throw a bunch of ideas at the wall and see what sticks conversation. But I guess democracy is often messy.”


Legislators move to block marijuana monopoly

June 16, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Douglas A. Berman was quoted in an article that appeared in the Columbus Dispatch about an attempt by state law makers to throw a constitutional obstacle in the path of supporters of a marijuana-legalization campaign. Berman said there are fundamental problems with the approach, including whether it is “constitutional to pass a constitutional amendment restricting your ability to pass a constitutional amendment.”

"The effort to block it this way strikes me as the worst of all possible worlds,” Berman said. “ If they’re against the substantive policy in this amendment, why not go out and campaign against it rather than force voters to attack the messenger through a new constitutional rule?”


Trekkers from central Ohio who felt Nepal quake now raising relief funds

June 16, 2015

Featured Expert: Gregory M. Travalio

Professor Gregory Travalio was quoted in a Columbus Dispatch article on the 2015 earthquake in Nepal - he was visiting the country at the time and survived the quake. 

“We went through villages where you couldn’t tell that anything had happened, and then we went through some small villages where there was lots of damage,” he said. 


Judge rules cause exists to charge officers in Cleveland boy’s death

June 12, 2015

Featured Expert: Ric Simmons

Professor Ric Simmons was cited in an article that appeared in The Boston Globe and subsequently Malay Mail Online, about a Cleveland judge's ruling that probable cause existed to charge two police officers in shooting death of 12-year-old Tamir Rice. Simmons said the judge's findings did not change the fact that prosecutors would decide the next steps.


Tamir Rice Shooting: Probable Cause Enough To Charge Police, Judge Says

June 12, 2015

Featured Expert: Ric Simmons

Professor Ric Simmons was quoted in an article on Headlines & Global News concerning a judge's ruling that probable cause existed to charge two Cleveland police officers who shot 12-year-old Tamir Rice, killing the boy over a toy gun.

"Given the prosecutor's expertise and access to the evidence, the prosecutor is in the best position to make a decision about whether to bring charges and what charges are appropriate," Simmons said.