Faculty in the News

Ohio State law professors are sought out for their expertise by a number of news media outlets and blogs with large audiences. Topics range from the death penalty to voter ID laws to artificial insemination – and our faculty members’ quotes and analysis can be found everywhere from small-town and national newspapers to radio broadcasts to cable news programs. The following is a selection of media coverage for Moritz College of Law faculty.

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Recent Media Coverage

U.S. Supreme Court Redistricting, Death Penalty Decisions Reverberate in California

June 30, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Douglas A. Berman was quoted in an article on AllGov California discussing the U.S. Supreme Court's rulings in a number of recent cases, including one in which they upheld Oklahoma's right to execute death row prisoners using a controversial combination of lethal injection drugs.

 “(It is) a pretty strong green light for California to go forward with whatever lethal injection protocol fits their own regulations and interests,” Berman said.


Where Do the Death Penalty Abolitionists Go From Here?

June 30, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Douglas A. Berman was quoted in a Bloomberg Business article on the U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruing in Glossip v. Gross, where the court upheld Oklahoma's use of the sedative midazolam in lethal injections.

"Seven of the nine standing Supreme Court justices—excluding Justices Breyer and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who signed on to his dissent—'apparently do not question the death penalty's essential constitutionality,'" Berman said.  


Editorial: Supreme Court upholds use of lethal injection drug

June 30, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Douglas A. Berman was mentioned in an editorial piece in The Independent discussing U.S. Supreme Court’s 5-4 decision to upholding the state of Oklahoma's use of the lethal injection drug midazolam.

 


Supreme Court Ruling Won’t Stop Search for Execution Drugs

June 29, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Douglas A. Berman was quoted in an article for Time on the search for more-effective lethal-injection drugs and execution methods following the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling that Oklahoma’s use of midazolam during lethal injections did not violate the Eighth Amendment’s ban on cruel and unusual punishment.

“I think this ruling will make states feel a little more comfortable moving forward with different drugs and different methods,” Berman said. "But states will still have their own challenges securing the drug, even though the constitutional issue is out of the way.”


Positions Harden on High Court over Capital Punishment

June 29, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Douglas A. Berman was quoted in an article in the National Law Journal discussing the U.S. Supreme Court's 5-4 decision in Glossip v. Gross to uphold Oklahoma's use of the sedative midazolam in lethal injections.


California death penalty: High court ruling could resume executions

June 29, 2015

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Douglas A. Berman was quoted in a San Jose Mercury News article on the U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruing in Glossip v. Gross, where the court upheld Oklahoma's use of the sedative midazolam in lethal injections.

"(It is) a pretty strong green light for California to go forward with whatever lethal injection protocol fits their own regulations and interests," Berman said.


Can Kasich win all 88 Ohio counties?

November 4, 2014

Featured Expert: David Stebenne

Professor David Stebenne was quoted in an Ohio Watchdog article about the possibility of Governor John Kasich winning all 88 Ohio counties in his re-election bid.

“It’s really hard to do,” he said. “As popular as the governor is and as weak as his opponent is, I doubt he’ll carry all 88 (counties).”

Stebenne said Ohio has some unusual counties, which tend to be really Democratic or really Republican.

He said a good example was the election of 1956, when President Dwight Eisenhower carried 87 of 88 Ohio counties.

“He lost one of the Appalachian counties — a poor county where the residents tend to vote Democratic no matter what,” Stebenne said. “There was even some humorous discussion in the Oval Office about that one county.”

Glenn and Voinovich were “the two most popular candidates in modern history,” he added, “and they each only did it once. While Kasich is popular, he really doesn’t have the broad appeal that these two did.”

Stebenne said that both Voinovich and Kasich come from communities that tend to be more Democratic in voter registration, but that Kasich’s first race for governor was more divisive than the races for Voinovich.

“Voinovich had electoral success in Cleveland and as governor because he was able to persuade Democrats to vote Republican,” he said. “Glenn had national appeal across party lines.”


Super PACs Keep Candidates Afloat With A Little Help From Their Friends

November 3, 2014

Featured Expert: Daniel P. Tokaji

Professor Dan Tokaji was quoted in a Huffington Post article on the impact of SuperPACs in the Michigan Senate race as well as other key races nationally.

Large contributions to super PACs from family, friends and business interests to support candidates in their home states are not entirely new. In the past two electoral cycles, donors focused on one candidate routinely created their own groups to spend solely on that one election. Dan Tojaki, an election law professor at The Ohio State University's Moritz College of Law, has dubbed those custom-made groups "buddy PACs."


Voter turnout for governor’s race could break record lows

October 25, 2014

Featured Expert: Daniel P. Tokaji

Professor Dan Tokaji was quoted in a Mansfield New Journal article on expected low voter turnout in Ohio.

“I expect (turnout) to be quite low compared to other midterm elections,because the Democrats have a weak (governor’s) candidate,” said Dan Tokaji, elections expert and professor at The Ohio State University’s Moritz College of Law.


Big spending by parties, independent groups drowns airwaves in negative attacks

October 22, 2014

Featured Expert: Daniel P. Tokaji

Professor Dan Tokaji was quoted in a Washington Post article on the record amount of independent spending in this year's congressional races.

Independent groups are “doing a lot of the dirty work in campaigns, while at the same time making it more difficult for campaigns to control the message,” said Daniel P. Tokaji, an Ohio State University professor of election law who has studied such groups’ impact on congressional races.