Faculty in the News

Ohio State law professors are sought out for their expertise by a number of news media outlets and blogs with large audiences. Topics range from the death penalty to voter ID laws to artificial insemination – and our faculty members’ quotes and analysis can be found everywhere from small-town and national newspapers to radio broadcasts to cable news programs. The following is a selection of media coverage for Moritz College of Law faculty.

To request an interview, media should click here for more information.

Recent Media Coverage

Opinion: Address mass incarceration, save black communities

August 1, 2014

Featured Expert: Michelle Alexander

Professor Michelle Alexander's book, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, is discussed in this NJ.com article.

"(Alexander) argues, with considerable evidence, that mass incarceration — the U.S. confines 25 percent of the world’s prisoners, though it has only five percent of the world’s population — is, indeed, an effort to prevent black men from full participation in American society, as was Jim Crow a century ago."


Ukraine’s ceasefire

June 25, 2014

Featured Expert: John B. Quigley

Professor John Quigley appeared on RT’s Cross Talk with Peter Lavelle to discuss the ceasefire declared between the Ukrainian government and separatists living in the eastern part of the country. As talks between the two parties continue, Quigley said it would be helpful if the two sides could come to an understanding that would assure the Russian speaking people of the area that they would have some control over their own political status.

“They need to do something real in order to assure the Russian speakers in Eastern Ukraine that they’re situation is going to be acceptable and that they will have some kind of control over their own political status,” he said. “When I was involved, this was 20 years ago, with the Ukraine on behalf of the OSCE, that’s where we were headed. Crimea got some autonomy, it didn’t get as much as I thought it needed, and what I was proposing at that time, and what I think might be helpful now, is to have that autonomy with some kind of international oversight, that is you would have something set up under the constitution of Ukraine, but if the autonomy of the eastern region is infringed upon in some way, there would be recourse that could be taken at the international level.”


Supreme Court Tinkering With Securities Class Actions

June 23, 2014

Professor Steven Davidoff wrote an op-ed in The New York Times DealBook on the Supreme Court decision in Halliburton Company v. Erica P. John Fund Inc. A case, he said, some saw as a potential end to the ability of shareholders to sue companies for securities fraud.

“The opinion shows that the Supreme Court seems to love to tinker with the securities laws, but it continues to refuse to kill the business,” he wrote. “The justices decided that the current state of play was sensible. They refused to overrule the decision made in the Basic case. They noted that markets may not be totally efficient, but what was going on here was 'not a binary, yes or no question.' Instead, the issue was whether the company’s price had been affected.The court thus refused to overrule the decision, allowing the fraud on the market theory to stand."


Scott Walker case shows growing closeness between politicians and wealthy allies

June 23, 2014

Featured Expert: Daniel P. Tokaji

Professor Daniel Tokaji was quoted in an article in The Washington Post about an investigation into allegations Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker illegally coordinated fundraising efforts with outside conservative groups during his campaign. State and federal laws restrict candidates from sharing political strategy with outside organizations. Tokaji noted, however, it is sometimes difficult, based on the current laws, to prove what is coordination and what is simply cooperation between the parties.

“They are trying to do as much as they can to cooperate without illegally coordinating — which, in truth, is not that difficult to do, because the line for what counts as coordination is a particularly high bar,” he said.

 


Illegal coordination not 'politics as usual,' observers say

June 21, 2014

Featured Expert: Daniel P. Tokaji

Professor Daniel Tokaji was quoted in an article in the Chippewa Herald about allegations that Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker’s campaign secretly coordinated its efforts with so-called “issue ad” groups, revealing how candidates might attempt to rely on unaccountable third-party groups to help them get elected.

“I don’t think it’s fair to characterize this as ‘politics as usual.’ This is something extraordinary, if the allegations are true,” he said. “Cooperation is common. Illegal coordination is pretty rare. And it’s hard to prove.”


Citizens United Made American Politics a Sham

June 19, 2014

Featured Expert: Daniel P. Tokaji

Professor Daniel Tokaji’s report “The New Soft Money: Outside Spending in Congressional Elections,” was the topic of an article on Ring of Fire, which discussed how the research behind the book showed the solution to the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision, to disallow official campaigns to coordinate with independent groups, was not a true solution to the problem the ruling itself created.

“Overall, the report paints a bleak picture of practically explicit coordination between campaigns and PACs. It is exactly what everyone feared and exactly what the Supreme Court pretended it was preventing,” the article stated.


Heart of John Doe dispute: Evolving campaign rules

June 19, 2014

Featured Expert: Daniel P. Tokaji

Professor Daniel Tokaji was quoted in an article in The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel about the John Doe investigation of Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and his allies over allegations that they violated campaign finance law by illegally coordinating fundraising efforts with outside groups. Tokaji said coordination is illegal for good reason – it "raises the specter of corruption," and the U.S. Supreme Court has upheld the purpose of preventing the exchange of cash for political favors.

"There are laws against coordination" he said. "We're not the Wild West yet." Until that happens — and he said it might be the way the Supreme Court is going — "laws must be enforced."


Ohio Report Looks at the Inside Influence of Soft Money in Politics

June 19, 2014

Featured Expert: Daniel P. Tokaji

Professor Daniel Tokaji was quoted in an article on the Public News Service about his book “The New Soft Money: Outside Spending in Congressional Elections.” Tokaji said while his research did not find any illegal coordination between campaigns and outside organizations, it did show that the law governing such interactions is being carefully sidestepped.

“We didn't find evidence of illegal coordination, but we did find a high degree of cooperation,” he said. “There are lots of ways that outside groups and candidates signal to one another without breaching the legal line."


Study Examines Role Of Citizens United Ruling On Politics

June 19, 2014

Featured Expert: Daniel P. Tokaji

Professor Daniel Tokaji spoke with WCBE, central Ohio’s NPR station, about his book “The New Soft Money: Outside Spending in Congressional Elections,” which examines the real-world impact outside spending is having on elections and politics since the U.S. Supreme Court's 2010 Citizens United ruling, which allows more political spending by corporations and unions.


How ‘Citizens United’ changed the game — in politicos’ own words

June 18, 2014

Featured Expert: Daniel P. Tokaji

Professor Daniel Tokaji was mentioned in an article on MSNBC about his report “The New Soft Money: Outside Spending in Congressional Elections,” which found that the explosion of outside spending in congressional campaigns since the U.S. Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision has led to “dramatic changes in the political landscape.”