Faculty in the News

Ohio State law professors are sought out for their expertise by a number of news media outlets and blogs with large audiences. Topics range from the death penalty to voter ID laws to artificial insemination – and our faculty members’ quotes and analysis can be found everywhere from small-town and national newspapers to radio broadcasts to cable news programs. The following is a selection of media coverage for Moritz College of Law faculty.

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Recent Media Coverage

A Buyout Offer That Raises Questions of Board Fairness and Duty

February 25, 2014

Featured Expert: Steven M. Davidoff

Professor Steven Davidoff wrote an op-ed for the New York Times about the American Financial Group trying to buy out minority shareholder National Interstate Corporation. Davidoff writes that the American Financial Group is making a myriad of mistakes in their attempt.

"If you happen to control a public company and want to buy out the remaining shareholders, avoid the mistakes made by the American Financial Group in its attempt to squeeze out the minority at the National Interstate Corporation," he writes.


Let Ukrainians Determine Their Own Fate

February 21, 2014

Featured Expert: John B. Quigley

Professor John Quigley wrote an op-ed for the Moscow Times about Ukraine's role in its future. International powers haven't hesitated to get involved, but Quigley writes that the decision should be made by the people of Ukraine.

"The ultimate choice must not be taken out of the hands of the population," he said. "Outside involvement should be directed at facilitating an outcome that is acceptable to the domestic parties."


The Final Battle for a REIT May Be Drawing Near

February 21, 2014

Featured Expert: Steven M. Davidoff

Professor Steven Davidoff wrote an op-ed for the New York Times about Corvex Management and Related Fund Management's battle to control Commonwealth REIT. Barry M. Portnoy and his son, Adam D. Portnoy, who currently manage the company, have employed a variety of tactics to prevent this from happening, An upcoming vote will have large ramifications, Davidoff writes.

"The vote on March 20 is a milestone, but if the Portnoys lose and CommonWealth’s directors are unseated, it is at best only the beginning of the end for CommonWealth shareholders as they continue to wait for the Portnoys to decide the shareholders’ fate," he said.


Ohio treasurer receives OK to host town halls

February 20, 2014

Featured Expert: Daniel P. Tokaji

Professor Daniel Tokaji was quoted in an article from the Associated Press about an attorney general opinion that allows the Ohio treasurer to conduct telephone town halls using public money. The opinion will likely have broad ramifications for the upcoming elections, Tokaji said.

“As a practical matter, while that legal advice is certainly right, very serious concerns can arise about whether these are really intended to inform Ohio constituents about the operations of his office or if they’re campaign events,” he said.


Shame Is a Powerful Deterrent

February 19, 2014

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Douglas Berman participated in a debate for the opinion pages of the New York Times about ways to potentially lower the number of accidents. Berman pointed out that increasing the severity of punishment does not always lead to deterrence. Instead, he suggested shaming as a possible alternative method. 

"Shaming has an established pedigree; it was widely used in colonial America," he said. "More recently, academics have debated the potential virtues and vices of modern shaming — often after a judge has ordered a shoplifter to wear a sign saying “I am a thief.” Because we have rarely tried to make traffic offenders “pay” for their crimes through prominent use of shaming, I cannot confidently predict it would be more effective. But given the challenges in trying to capture the attention and obedience of busy New York City drivers, it is worthwhile to consider creative alternative punishment schemes."


Voters’ Bill of Rights blocked in Ohio

February 19, 2014

Featured Expert: Daniel P. Tokaji

Professor Daniel Tokaji was quoted in an article from MSNBC about the battle in Ohio to create a "Voter's Bill of Rights." Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine, along with other Republicans, opposes the movement, but Tokaji believes the objections are largely unfounded.

“The cited portions of the petition accurately state current Ohio law.,” said Tokaji via email. “In my view, the AG’s letter is really a reach.”


Gay-rights suit may alter parents on birth records

February 18, 2014

Featured Expert: Marc Spindelman

Professor Marc Spindelman was interviewed for an article in the Columbus Dispatch regarding a lawsuit filed in federal court in Cincinnati seeking to challenge the state's decision to prohibit listing both members of same-sex couples on birth certificates.

Spindelman said the lawsuit is probably designed to “chip away at the prohibitions on same-sex marriage in an incremental way.”

He added: “Can you treat same-sex couples lawfully married in another jurisdiction differently than a cross-sex couple for the same purposes? It seems to puts a leaden thumb on the scales in the favor of cross-sex couples.”


Gay-rights suit may alter parents on birth records

February 18, 2014

Featured Expert: Marc Spindelman

Professor Marc Spindelman was quoted in a Columbus Dispatch article about a gay-rights law suit that seeks to give same-sex couples the right to put both names on their child's birth certificate.

“Can you treat same-sex couples lawfully married in another jurisdiction differently than a cross-sex couple for the same purposes?" Spindelman asks. "It seems to puts a leaden thumb on the scales in the favor of cross-sex couples.”


Outrage Over Wall St. Pay, but Shrugs for Silicon Valley?

February 18, 2014

Featured Expert: Steven M. Davidoff

Professor Steven Davidoff wrote an op-ed for the New York Times about a perceived double-standard in public outcry between compensation on Wall Street and compensation on Silicon Valley. Davidoff argues that excess is scoffed at on Wall Street, but celebrated in Silicon Valley with no real rationale.

"Wall Street bashing ignores the fact that it is finance that produces the money for tech start-ups," he writes. "Finance may not be the sexy part of life, but it is integral to success, as much as good roads or telecommunications. And yes, finance has had its problems — but so does Silicon Valley."


Judge cited Ohio obscenity law in approving prosecutor's request to destroy rape case evidence

February 9, 2014

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

Professor Douglas Berman was quoted in an article from the Associated Press about the destruction of evidence in an Ohio rape and murder case. The destruction could be justified, Berman said, because harm that could occur if the material became public.

"You preserve any of this stuff, who knows not only who get their hands on it, but who knows who is eager to misuse this material for whatever potential criminal purpose," he said.