Faculty in the News

Ohio State law professors are sought out for their expertise by a number of news media outlets and blogs with large audiences. Topics range from the death penalty to voter ID laws to artificial insemination – and our faculty members’ quotes and analysis can be found everywhere from small-town and national newspapers to radio broadcasts to cable news programs. The following is a selection of media coverage for Moritz College of Law faculty.

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Recent Media Coverage

Pro-DeWine group to bring dark money to 2018 Ohio governor's race

December 14, 2017

Featured Expert: Daniel P. Tokaji

Professor Dan Tokaji was quoted in Cleveland.com about Securing Ohio’s Future, an advocacy group that isn’t required to disclose its donors or expenses.

"Taking a look at their website, it certainly appears a big part of their purpose is to support the Republican gubernatorial ticket," Tokaji said. "Does that mean they're in violation of the law? I can't say that for sure based on what I've seen, and based on the murkiness of the legal standard, but it's certainly pushing the envelope."
 


How Ohio could be affected by Supreme Court gerrymandering case brought by Maryland Republicans - Out of Line: Impact 2017 and Beyond

December 13, 2017

Featured Expert: Edward B. Foley

Professor Edward Foley was quoted in Cleveland.com about two gerrymandering cases on the U.S. Supreme Court docket.

"The two cases give the court an opportunity to say that there is a line that if you go too far, you are in violation" of the Constitution Foley said.
 


Data cited in SCOTUS decision upholding Sentencing Commission was 'flimsy' and 'flat-out wrong'

December 13, 2017

Featured Expert: Douglas A. Berman

A post by Professor Doug Berman on his blog, Sentencing Law and Policy was quoted in ABA Journal. Sentencing disparities have been documented since the 1950s, according to Berman.
 
“The notion that there were not any truly justified concerns about sentencing disparity before modern reforms cannot withstand serious scrutiny,” he writes.
 


Tax professors, other experts, identify flaws in US House, Senate tax bills, including international provisions

December 13, 2017

Featured Expert: Ari Glogower

A paper co-authored by Professor Ari Glogower, The Games They Will Play: Tax Games, Roadblocks, and Glitches Under the New Legislation was cited in MNE Tax
 
"Thirteen prominent US tax professors and other tax experts have co-authored an important paper that identifies technical flaws and adverse consequences of the US House and Senate tax reform bills provisions, including key international tax reform proposals," MNE Tax reports.


'Death Sentence': World Leaders Slam Trump Over Reckless Jerusalem Stunt

December 7, 2017

Featured Expert: John B. Quigley

Professor John Quigley was quoted in Sputnik International about President Donald Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. 

"I think there is great risk that [Daesh] will use Trump’s statement as a recruiting tool," Quigley said. "An attachment to Jerusalem is strong throughout the region. That will make it difficult for the United States to have a role in facilitating negotiations."
 


The Pervasiveness of Sexual Harassment

December 5, 2017

Featured Expert: L. Camille Hébert

Professor L. Camille Hébert appeared on WOSU’s All Sides with Ann Fisher to discuss sexual harassment in the wake of several high-profile cases that have made national headlines in recent weeks.


Trump’s lawyer: the president can’t obstruct justice. 13 legal experts: yes, he can.

December 4, 2017

Featured Expert: Peter M. Shane

Professor Peter Shane was quoted in Vox in response to President Donald Trump’s lawyer, John Dowd, who claimed that the president cannot be found guilty of obstruction of justice.

“It's nonsense. A president's constitutional role does not include a prerogative to act corruptly. A president who ‘corruptly’ obstructs or impedes ‘the due and proper administration of the law’ commits a crime,” Shane said. “It is worth noting that—although impeachment proceedings are civil, not criminal in nature—articles of impeachment voted against both Nixon and [Bill] Clinton charged obstruction of justice as a violation of the president's constitutional obligation to take care that laws are faithfully executed.”
 


Trump’s lawyer: the president can’t obstruct justice. 13 legal experts: yes, he can.

December 4, 2017

Featured Expert: Ric Simmons

Professor Ric Simmons was quoted in Vox in response to President Donald Trump’s lawyer, John Dowd, who claimed that the president cannot be found guilty of obstruction of justice.

It is not clear what John Dowd meant by this statement. If he literally meant that a president cannot ever be guilty of obstruction of justice, he is completely wrong. A president can commit obstruction of justice by hiding or destroying documents, or impeding an investigation, or in any number of ways,” Simmons said. “However, if Dowd meant that the president is not guilty of obstruction of justice for this particular action (the firing of James Comey when he knew Flynn had lied to the FBI), then he is correct—the president is not obstructing justice when he fires someone he is legally entitled to fire. This may be what Dowd meant when he said that ‘as the chief law enforcement officer,’ Trump cannot obstruct justice. So Dowd was correct in this case, but he overstated his argument quite dramatically.”
 


Area companies on alert as sexual-harassment complaints get spotlight

December 2, 2017

Featured Expert: L. Camille Hébert

Professor L. Camille Hébert was quoted in The Columbus Dispatch about a number of sexual harassment claims brought against several high-profile men in recent weeks.

“I’m a little conflicted,” Hébert said. “At one level, I’m very happy to see the awareness of things like the MeToo campaign. But if the impression is that a woman comes forward on Monday, and the guy gets fired on Tuesday, that’s not realistic. And if the sense is that it’s so common, then maybe it’s not as big a deal—I have some discomfort about what’s happening with that.”
 


Failing to address harassment allegations can cost employers

December 1, 2017

Featured Expert: L. Camille Hébert

Professor L. Camille Hébert was quoted in The Associated Press about addressing allegations of sexual misconduct in the workplace.

“You don’t have to fire people necessarily, but doing nothing is usually not helpful,” Hébert said.