Events

Recent Events

Refractive Surveillance: Monitoring Customers to Manage Workers

April 4, 2018

Collecting information about one group can facilitate control over an entirely different group – a phenomenon known as ‘refractive surveillance.’ This dynamic is apparent in the retail space where employers have begun to use surveillance technologies and data collected about customers’ behaviors and propensities for the management of workers’ conditions of employment.  Please join the Program on Data and Governance on Wednesday, April 4, 2018, as Professor Karen Levy, Cornell University, delivers a talk on “Refractive Surveillance: Monitoring Customers to Manage Workers.”

Professor Levy’s lecture will explore refractive surveillance in the context of retail stores by investigating how collection of customer data can facilitate new forms of managerial control over workers. Levy suggests that effects of surveillance cannot be fully understood without considering how populations might be managed on the basis of data collected about others.

The event will take place in the Barrister Club, located at 25 W. 11th Ave., Columbus, Ohio, 43201 (located across 11th Avenue from Drinko Hall, above Panera). Parking is available in the South Campus Gateway garage. Boxed lunches will be served to those who register in advance.

General Information


Health Data Analytics: Building a New Governance Framework

February 8, 2018

Wearables. Mobile medical apps. Robotics. Healthcare analytics. These and other business practices and technologies pose difficult governance challenges. How should the healthcare data they generate and deploy be protected? How should the healthcare data technologies they enable be regulated? Please join the Program on Data and Governance (PDG) on Thursday, February 8, 2018, as Professor Nicolas Terry, Indiana University McKinney School of Law, delivers a talk on “Health Data Analytics: Building a New Governance Framework.”

Professor Terry’s lecture will explore the complex policy choices facing technologically-mediated healthcare and its stakeholders in this “second machine age” and examine both present and potential governance models for the sector.

The event will take place in the Barrister Club, located at 25 W. 11th Ave., Columbus, Ohio, 43201 (located across 11th Avenue from Drinko Hall, above Panera). Parking is available in the South Campus Gateway garage. Boxed lunches will be served to those who register in advance.

General Information


Must Privacy Give Way to Use Regulation?

November 9, 2017

Must Privacy Give Way to Use Regulation?

Helen Nissenbaum, Professor of Information Science at Cornell Tech, unraveled the debate between those who continue to see continued value in traditional information privacy protections and those who would forgo privacy in favor of use regulation of data analytics instead. Professor Neil Richards of the Washington University in St. Louis Law School, an internationally-recognized expert in privacy law, information law, and freedom of expression, provided commentary on Nissenbaum’s lecture and engage her in dialogue. Audio coming soon.

 


New Technology, the Fourth Amendment, and the Future of Privacy

September 13, 2017

Ben Wizner, Director of the ACLU’s Speech, Privacy and Technology Project and chief legal advisor to NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden gave a speech about the impact of modern technology on Privacy. Mr. Wizner’s talk reflect on privacy law in the United States and the upcoming Carpenter Supreme Court case concern law enforcement access to cell site location information.


Data Points: Adventures in Usable Privacy and Security

April 11, 2017

Dr. Lorrie Cranor, Carnegie Mellon, presented a lecture on “Adventures in Usable Privacy and Security: From Empirical Studies to Public Policy.”

Covering her research at Carnegie Mellon and as Chief Technologist of the Federal Trade Commission, Dr. Cranor addressed pressing research questions for strengthening digital security and privacy practices. Such as how can researchers put study participants in realistic risky situations without actually putting them at risk? Why might it be counterproductive to mandate frequent password changes? And how are identity thieves able to hijack mobile phone accounts?