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Ohio State Law Journal launches online supplement

May 3, 2012 | Posts

Since 1935, the Ohio State Law Journal has been promoting and advancing discussion on the legal issues of the day via its traditional print journal format. On April 19, the journal launched a new online supplement, Furthermore, to complement its print publication.

The inaugural issue features three practitioner-written essays focused on major contemporary topics facing the state of Ohio. Furthermore provides the journal with a forum to publish shorter, less-footnoted pieces on current legal issues as well as responses to thought-provoking published pieces.

With the addition of Furthermore, the Ohio State Law Journal joins nearly 35 other law reviews, which have extended legal publication into a dynamic Web-based forum. The movement online recognizes the evolving ways in which professors, practitioners, and students digest legal scholarship as well as the rapidly changing contours of legal issues. Online supplements allow law reviews to publish high-quality pieces on a faster publication timeline and provide their readership with convenient access to those works.

Furthermore emerged from the 2011-2012 managing board and will be the focus of intense development during the 2012-2013 managing board’s tenure. The name Furthermore represents the journal’s objective with the online supplement – to further develop legal ideas. It is also recognition that the conversation that promotes such ideas is never-ending: As legal thinkers and practitioners seek better ways to interpret and react to the law, there is always something more to say or slightly adjust. The Ohio State Law Journal is committed to developing Furthermore into a dynamic forum, one that zealously drives legal scholarship forward.

In addition to the inaugural issue, Furthermore soon will publish two forthcoming student notes: “Access Denied! The Case for Extending Full First Amendment Protection to Proxy Speech Under Citizens United” by 2L Christina Karam and “Drowning in the Wake of Concepcion: How to Protect Small Claims Plaintiffs Bound by Mandatory Arbitration Agreements” by 2LTodd Seaman.

The journal welcomes submissions of timely legal scholarship from professors, practitioners and students in the following format:

  • stand-alone articles that are shorter, more focused, and less footnoted than traditional works,
  • responses to articles published in the journalor other comparable law reviews,
  • multi-author works debating contentious legal issues, and
  • updates or recent developments to already-published articles.

Please visit Furthermore’s website for publication requirements and to view the inaugural issue.