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Moritz LL.M. Graduate to Head OSU’s China Gateway

February 12, 2010 | Alumni

Phoebe You, a 2009 The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law LL.M. graduate, was named acting director of The Ohio State University’s new China Gateway, which will be implemented in stages with the first exploratory phase opening in Shanghai this month. The Gateway is the result of the University’s global initiative to expand the reach and impact of its many resources with a physical presence in strategic areas of the world. When the Gateway is fully implemented, it will serve as a state-of-the-art facility for recruiting, networking, teaching, business consulting, and executive training.

You, a native of Weihai, Shandong, China, graduated with her LL.B. from East China University of Science and Technology before attending Ohio State. At Moritz, she interned at Schottenstein Zox & Dunn in Columbus as well as worked as a research assistant for Moritz Professor Daniel Chow.

“Phoebe is extremely capable, meticulous, and loyal,” Chow said. “We needed to find someone who would be creative and aggressive but also careful because a lot of her work involves contacts with the Chinese government. We’re confident that Phoebe will make great strides during the Gateway’s initial stages.”

William Brustein, vice provost for global strategies and international affairs, anticipates You will provide the Ohio State China Gateway with a solid foundation from which to build. “Phoebe’s legal background, knowledge of the country, and her enthusiasm to help us build a presence for Ohio State in Shanghai is exceptional,” Brustein said. “The China Gateway is an important step for Ohio State to enhance its partnerships around the globe.”

The China Gateway and several others that Ohio State has in the works are expected to provide the University with a presence in other countries that can be used for continuing education, international student recruitment, alumni and donor relations, study abroad in-country orientations, and serve as a base of operations for faculty research. A key role of the China Gateway is to provide executive training programs for business officials from multi-national companies doing business in China as well as for Chinese government officials and business entrepreneurs.

The Gateways are an international engagement component that will enable the University to broaden its relationships and deepen its investment in key parts of the world. Currently under consideration are Ohio State Gateways in India, Brazil, Turkey, sub-Saharan Africa, and Europe.

“My initial goals include developing the OSU alumni network in Greater China and assisting Ohio State in recruiting top students from China,” You said, “as well as exploring the market for our high-level specialized training programs, providing assistance and opportunities for exchange professors and students, and promoting Ohio State to the biggest market in the world.”

Chow, who serves on the University’s China Gateway Advisory Committee that is helping launch the China Gateway office, said that You was a great choice for the position because of her knowledge of the law and fluency in both Chinese and English.

“Her legal background will certainly prove useful to us,” Chow said. “As the Gateway progresses through its phases of development, it will need continuing legal approvals.”

Chow is the College’s Joseph S. Platt-Porter Wright Morris & Arthur Professor of Law.

You credited Moritz and several of its faculty and staff, including Chow; Ellen Deason, the Joanne Wharton Murphy/Classes of 1965 and 1973 Professor in Law and faculty director of the Moritz LL.M. program; Jessica Richman Dworkin, assistant dean for international and graduate affairs; and Laura Landy Carr, assistant director of international and graduate programs.

“Isn’t it wonderful to become part of a complete new project and watch it grow?” You said. “It’s a job that will help Ohio State expand to the global market and at the same time help China be exposed to more international perspectives. I see it as a win-win situation in an extremely globalized market like what we have today.”