Distinguished Practitioners in Residence Program

The Distinguished Practitioners in Residence Program brings accomplished practitioners as adjunct professors to Moritz to teach one-credit, concentrated courses in advanced aspects of business law.  The courses often take place over a long weekend or during a break, which allows students to immerse themselves in the topic area.

Fall Semester 2016

Corporate Governance Law

October 3 – 7

Dan SandmanDan D. Sandman ’73 former General Counsel & Corporate Secretary U.S. Steel  Profile

James Johnson     James Johnson ’72 former Chief Legal Officer Procter & Gamble  Profile

This course examines the role of in-house counsel in a major U.S. corporation. Topics of study include corporate organization, litigation management strategies, legal compliance, attorney-client privilege, the role of the Corporate Secretary, annual reports and annual meetings, among others. Prior completion of or concurrent enrollment in Business Associations is required. Take-home exam.

Introduction to International Mergers, Acquisitions, and Strategic Investments

October 24 – 28

Scott V. Simpson

Scott V. Simpson Partner, Co-Head of Global Transactions Practice, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom (UK) LLP  Profile

 

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Lorenzo Corte Partner, Cross-Border Transactions Practice, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom (UK) LLP  Profile

 

This course examines the legal, business and strategic complexities connected to the development of a merger or acquisition involving U.S. public companies and (primarily) European acquirers. Materials focus on comparing U.S. and European domestic law regulation of M&A practice, the development of stock purchase agreements and joint ventures, fiduciary responsibilities of Boards of Directors, representations and warranties, accounting and tax aspects of the multiple business relationships, and the strategic lawyering initiatives, governed by professional ethics, that are used to explore and conclude such transactions. Two major case studies integrate the course materials.

 

Spring Semester 2017

Negotiation and Mediation

March 13 – 16

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James K.L. Lawrence Member at Frost Brown Todd LLC  Profile

This course offers skills and strategies for effective negotiation and mediation advocacy emphasizing the importance of building working relationships and achieving better outcomes in individual and group negotiation and mediation. Two broad objectives have been built into the course design: to practice basic negotiation skills through interactive exercises and to familiarize the student with various strategies for dispute resolution other than resolving differences through litigation. The student will learn how to prepare effectively for negotiation and mediation, how to negotiate agreements on contentious issues and how to review a negotiation or mediation with an eye toward developing rules of thumb for what went well and for improving what might have been handled differently.

Resolving Community Civil Rights Disputes

March 27 – 31

Grande Lum Director of the Divided Communities Project  Profile

The course will focus on multi-party negotiations, working in teams, group decision-making, and negotiating on behalf of organizations to solve complex problems, specifically when there are communities divided by civil rights disputes. In the context of both real case studies and simulations, we will address diverse public policy issues, including civil rights, racial justice, economic inequality. Civil unrest such as experienced recently in police-community conflicts such as Ferguson and Baltimore increase polarization among groups of residents in ways not seen in decades. The unrest often produces positive results if they lead to policy and cultural change. In many instances, participants experience the divisions as intense and pervasive, yet remain optimistic that they can be resolved. These deep divisions pose significant challenges to the integrity of our democratic society and can quickly escalate to bitter contests, leaving fissures within communities for decades, and possibly resulting in major economic damage and even loss of life.